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Wisdom tooth removal: Young woman spends two nights in ICU after failures by dentist

A dentist made multiple failures in treating an infection following her wisdom tooth extraction. Photo / 123rf

A woman in her 20s spent two nights in a New Zealand intensive care unit (ICU) after getting one of her wisdom teeth removed.

Today, a Health and Disability Commission report revealed the hospital stay came after a dentist made multiple failures in treating an infection following her wisdom tooth extraction, including allowing his patient to self-medicate and mistaking it for a dry socket.

The woman – who has not been named for privacy reasons – had her lower right wisdom removed in April 2018.

In the days following, she developed a painful mouth and “was finding it difficult to eat or open her mouth”, the report said. She visited the dental service on three occasions to discuss her symptoms.

She also began taking an antibiotic not prescribed by the dental clinic, which she had obtained overseas. She disclosed this with her dentist, who did not advise her to stop self-medicating, the investigation found.

Deputy Health and Disability Commissioner Kevin Allan criticised this, saying “a patient who is taking self-prescribed medication is a significant ‘red flag'”.

The report said the dentist diagnosed a dry socket and prescribed a course of the antibiotic amoxicillin.

Her infection worsened and she was admitted to hospital, where pus was drained from her socket and she was treated in the intensive care unit for two nights.

In the report, Allan said the dentist failed to recognise that the woman’s presenting complication was an infection and not a dry socket.

The dentist also did not provide appropriate treatment even if it was a dry socket, and missed an opportunity to recommend that she stop taking her own antibiotic and take amoxicillin instead, Allan said.

He said the dentist failed to comply with the Dental Council’s documentation standards and that the dental service had inadequate policies for ascertaining the medications being taken by clients, and that poor record-keeping and missing records indicated broader systems issues at the practice.

“Neither dentist ascertained what antibiotic [the woman] was taking. I am not satisfied that the dental service had adequate policies to deal with the situation when a patient is known to be taking medication that has not been prescribed by the practice to treat dental conditions.”

As a result of the investigation, the Deputy Commissioner recommended that the dental service audit its clinical records and develop further policies on the management of patients who are taking medications not prescribed by the clinic.

He also advised that both dentists involved undertook further training, and that the dentists and the dental clinic apologise to the woman.

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Radford woman started career as dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh.” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Regil.

She had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist, she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have to. I just have to,” said Regil.

Regil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting is a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

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Ex-N.J. Gov. Chris Christie spends 5th day in hospital for COVID-19. Updates on care and his spirits.

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is spending his fifth day in the hospital after contracting COVID-19, but he’s in good spirits and under good care, a source with knowledge of the situation confirmed to NJ Advance Media.

Christie’s exact condition remains unknown. The 58-year-old has not tweeted since Saturday, the day he announced he tested positive for the coronavirus and checked himself into Morristown Medical Center.

Christie’s stay is currently in line with an average COVID-19 hospitalization. Five days is the median length of hospital stays for coronavirus patients outside of China, according to an analysis of 52 studies published last month in BMC Medicine.

Meanwhile, the source, who asked for anonymity to speak candidly about the matter, shot down a rumor that bounced around social media Wednesday morning that Christie was on a ventilator.

Matt Katz, a reporter for New York public radio station WNYC, also tweeted Wednesday afternoon that multiple people close to Christie say the rumor was untrue.

Only the most severe coronavirus patients required to be put on a ventilator, a life-saving machine that helps patients breathe.

Of the 591 patients across across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases as of Tuesday night, 45 — or about 8% — were on ventilators, according to the state’s tracing website.

MORE: Here’s the type of treatments doctors say Christie may be getting

Christie announced Saturday morning he tested positive for the the coronavirus — a day after President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump announced they had tested positive. Since then, more than a dozen aides and officials in Trump’s orbit have also tested positive.

Christie — who has struggled with his weight and has a lifelong history of asthma — tweeted Saturday night that despite “feeling good” and having only “mild symptoms,” he checked himself into the hospital Saturday as a precautionary measure. Because of his conditions, he’s at higher risk of developing complications from the virus.

The Mendham resident hasn’t shared what symptoms he has or how he’s being treated.

Star-Ledger columnist Tom Moran spoke on the phone with Christie on Monday. The ex-governor said King Abdullah of Jordan had called to wish him well, ribbing Moran, who had doubted their friendship in a 2012 column. Moran also wrote Christie sounded “raspy but didn’t cough once” during their 10-minute phone call, and that Christie would not discuss his condition.

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Homepage

In the week before his positive test, Christie spent four days helping Trump prepare for the first presidential debate, often in a room with five or six people where no one wore masks. Christie — a longtime Trump friend and ally and fellow Republican — also attended the now-infamous Rose Garden ceremony where Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

At least 10 others at the Rose Garden event on Sept. 28 have since tested positive, including New Jersey natives Kellyanne Conway, a former adviser to the

A Radford woman started her career as a dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Teresa Regil.

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Ahe had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said  Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach, and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have too. I just have too,” said Regil.

Rigil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4th.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

Continue Reading

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President Trump, undergoing an experimental antiviral treatment, spends a third day in the hospital.

President Trump entered his third day in the hospital on Sunday after contracting the coronavirus and falling ill last week, even as confusing and contradictory accounts about his medical condition added to the national sense of uncertainty and concern for the 74-year-old president’s well-being.

Seeking to project an optimistic image to the world, President Trump released a four-minute video on Saturday evening from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., to say that he is “starting to feel good” and would “be back soon.”

Wearing a blue jacket, cuff links and an American flag pin but no necktie, the president looked much paler than he did during his debate in Cleveland on Tuesday with former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Thanking the staff at Walter Reed, Mr. Trump said that he “wasn’t feeling so well” when he arrived at the hospital on Friday, but that he felt “much better now.”

On Saturday night, the White House physician, Dr. Sean P. Conley, released a new statement, saying that Mr. Trump had made “substantial progress” and would be monitored closely as he undergoes a five-day experimental antiviral drug regimen for Covid-19 and continues to receive doses of remdesivir, a drug that has shown some efficacy at speeding recovery.

“While not out of the woods, the team remains cautiously optimistic,” Dr. Conley noted.

But that optimism was not shared by everyone close to the president and just a few hours earlier, Mark Meadows, the president’s chief of staff, had offered a darker picture.

“The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning,” Mr. Meadows said. “And the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.”

Many doctors stressed the critical period of time — about seven to 10 days after infection — when a patient’s condition can take a turn for the worse. Some people respond to an infection with an overly exuberant immune response that can worsen their illness and even prove fatal.

The release of only sketchy information made it difficult for outside medical experts to assess the president’s condition and the lack of clear communication was compounded by the vagaries of a virus that continues to puzzle scientists.

Some 7.3 million Americans have been infected since the pandemic swept around the world and more than 208,000 have died.

Tens of thousands have suffered serious illness with an untold number dogged by symptoms weeks or even months after infection.

It remained unclear when Mr. Trump was infected. But his case is part of a widening outbreak in the nation’s capital, with scores of people the president had contact with in recent days testing positive.

At least seven people who attended a White House event on Sept. 26 have since tested positive for the coronavirus. Six of them, including the first lady, sat in the first several rows of a Supreme Court nomination ceremony for Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the White House Rose Garden. The seventh was the president himself.

Gov. Chris Christie