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Quebec sees largest daily case count, Ontario has a slight decrease in new COVID-19 cases

For more on Monday’s top stories, and on how the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the country, please refer to our live updates below, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

17,122 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 168,960 diagnoses, 9,504 deaths and 142,334 recoveries (as of Oct. 6, 6:00 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 1,900 active cases (19,211 total cases, including 281 deaths, 17,030 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 1,384 active cases (9,841 total cases, 244 deaths, 8,184 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 781 active cases (2,246 total cases, 24 deaths, 1,441 resolved)

  • New Brunswick – 5 active cases (205 cases, 2 deaths, 198 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 4 active case (277 total cases, 4 deaths, 269 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories – 0 active cases (5 total cases, 5 resolved)

  • Nova Scotia – 3 active cases (1,089 total cases, 65 deaths 1,021 resolved)

  • Ontario – 5,469 active cases (55,362 total cases, 2,987 deaths, 67 033 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island – 3 active case (61 total cases, 58 resolved)

  • Quebec –  8,082 active cases (81,014 total cases, 5,899 deaths, 66,180 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan – 139 active cases (1,984 total cases, 24 deaths, 1,821 resolved)

  • Yukon – 0 active cases (15 total cases, 15 resolved)

  • Nunavut – 0 active cases (8 presumptive positive cases)

  • CFB Trenton – 0 active cases (13 total cases, 13 resolved)

Armed forces reveal COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began

The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) reported 222 COVID-19 cases since the beginning of the pandemic. Currently, 24 are active and 198 are resolved.

The Tuesday update indicated that “leadership is closely monitoring” the virus impact on the CAF.

Quebec continues to see record-breaking daily case counts

Quebec reported 1,364 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday, the largest daily case count to date, bringing the cumulative total of cases in the province to 81,014.

The majority of new cases are in Montreal (329), the Quebec City region (265) and Laval (173). Most cases are people between the ages of 20 and 59. Individuals between the ages of 20 and 29 account for 16.3 per cent of cases, while people between the ages of 40 and 49 represent 14.6 per cent of cases.

The province is also reporting 17 new deaths. Three occurred in the last 24 hours, nine deaths occurred between September 29 and October 4, one occurred before September 29 and four deaths occurred at an unknown date.

Hospitalizations increased by 36 in the same timeframe, with five more people in ICU. There are currently 397 people in Quebec hospitals with COVID-19.

More than 500 new cases, 7 deaths reported in Ontario

Ontario reported 548 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, with 201 cases from the Toronto area. Peel, Ottawa and York also continue to make up a large proportion of cases in the province.

CDC Survey Shows Slight Uptick in Uninsured Adults

The number of uninsured adults in the U.S. crept up to 14.5% in 2019, from 13.3% in 2018, according to data from the CDC’s National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

Put into context, the share of adults 18-64 who were uninsured last year was still much lower than the 20.4% of adults who reported being uninsured in 2013 — 3 years after passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

While she’s not “especially surprised” by the slight uptick in the percentage of uninsured adults, given the “incremental increases” seen in the last few years, Rachel Garfield, PhD, co-director of the Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured for the Kaiser Family Foundation, said it is “troubling” given the turmoil of the last 6 months, between the COVID-19 pandemic and economic downturn.

The survey also found that slightly more men than women, more young adults than older adults, and far more Hispanic adults than non-Hispanic adults lacked insurance. Additionally, more adults in “fair or poor” health were uninsured compared with those who said their health was “excellent, very good, or good.”

When asked their reasons for not having insurance, 73.7% said plans were not affordable. The percentage of adults who found coverage unaffordable increased with age: 66.8% of adults 18-29 compared with 80.9% of those 50-64 stated that cost was a reason they did not have a health plan.

“We have seen pretty consistently, for a very, very long time that most people who are uninsured say that they’re uninsured because of costs,” Garfield said.

While some people expected the ACA to make coverage affordable for everyone, she noted, “there are people who are falling through the cracks in that coverage and [who] still can’t afford health insurance.”

The percentage of older adults who said they could not afford coverage also troubled Garfield, given the ACA’s restriction on underwriting health coverage based on age.

But it’s unclear whether the individual reporting affordability issues actually shopped for a health plan, she said.

The report highlighted other key findings, including:

  • 16% of men were uninsured versus 13.1% of women
  • 17.5% of adults 18-29 were uninsured versus 10.5% of adults 50-64
  • 30.2% of Hispanic adults were uninsured versus 14.3% of non-Hispanic Black and 10.2% of non-Hispanic white adults
  • 17.6% of adults who described their health as “fair or poor” lacked insurance, while 14.1% of adults in “excellent, very good, or good” health reported being uninsured

Beyond cost, respondents gave other reasons for not having a health plan: 25.3% said they were not eligible for insurance; 21.3% did “not need or want” coverage; 18.4% said enrollment was “too difficult or confusing”; 18% said they “could not find a plan” that met their needs; and 8.5% said that they had enrolled but their coverage had not started. (Respondents were allowed to provide more than one reason for not having insurance.)

In drilling down into these responses, the survey found that the percentage of adults currently ineligible for insurance was higher, at 30.4%, among Hispanic adults compared with 22.3%