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Coronavirus updates: Birx warns of ‘troubling signs’ in Northeast amid ‘very different’ spread of COVID-19

“What we did in the spring is not going to work in the fall,” Birx said.

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1 million people worldwide.

Over 36.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 7.6 million diagnosed cases and at least 213,570 deaths.

California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 847,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 811,000 cases and over 728,000 cases, respectively.

More than 190 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least 10 of which are in crucial phase three studies. Of those 10 potential vaccines in late-stage trials, there are currently five that will be available in the United States if approved.

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U.S. signs agreement with AstraZeneca to develop, supply COVID-19 antibody treatment

(Reuters) – The U.S. government on Friday signed an agreement with AstraZeneca Plc <AZN.L> worth $486 million to develop and secure supplies of up to 100,000 doses of COVID-19 antibody treatment, a similar class of drugs that was used to treat President Donald Trump.

The U.S. health agency will provide the funding to AstraZeneca for two Phase 3 clinical trials under operation Warp Speed, which is aimed at speeding up treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

One trial will evaluate the safety and efficacy of the experimental treatment to prevent infection for up to 12 months, in about 5,000 participants, while the second trial will evaluate post-exposure preventative and pre-emptive treatment in roughly 1,100 participants.

AstraZeneca said it plans to supply up to 100,000 doses starting towards the end of 2020 and the US Government can acquire up to an additional one million doses in 2021 under a separate agreement.

In a video posted on Twitter on Wednesday, Trump credited Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc’s <REGN.O> therapeutic for his recovery. Trump received Regeneron’s treatment last week after he was diagnosed with COVID-19.

(Reporting by Ankur Banerjee in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D’Silva)

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U.S. Signs Agreement With AstraZeneca to Develop, Supply COVID-19 Antibody Treatment | Top News

(Reuters) – The U.S. government on Friday signed an agreement with AstraZeneca Plc

worth $486 million to develop and secure supplies of up to 100,000 doses of COVID-19 antibody treatment, a similar class of drugs that was used to treat President Donald Trump.

The U.S. health agency will provide the funding to AstraZeneca for two Phase 3 clinical trials under operation Warp Speed, which is aimed at speeding up treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

One trial will evaluate the safety and efficacy of the experimental treatment to prevent infection for up to 12 months, in about 5,000 participants, while the second trial will evaluate post-exposure preventative and pre-emptive treatment in roughly 1,100 participants.

AstraZeneca said it plans to supply up to 100,000 doses starting towards the end of 2020 and the US Government can acquire up to an additional one million doses in 2021 under a separate agreement.

In a video posted on Twitter on Wednesday, Trump credited Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc’s

therapeutic for his recovery. Trump received Regeneron’s treatment last week after he was diagnosed with COVID-19.

(Reporting by Ankur Banerjee in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D’Silva)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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17 Sure Signs You’ve Had COVID Already

Still in his first week of having coronavirus, President Donald Trump’s doctors described him as being not “out of the woods.” The same could be said for thousands of COVID patients who still experience symptoms months after contracting the virus. “A study of 143 people in Rome’s biggest hospital, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, followed hospital patients after they were discharged,” reports the BBC. “It showed 87% had at least one symptom nearly two months later and more than half still had fatigue.” Here is the study’s list of symptoms in order from least common to most common—read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.

woman hand flush toilet after using
woman hand flush toilet after using

“Some people with COVID-19 develop gastrointestinal symptoms either alone or with respiratory symptoms,” reports Healthline. “Recently, researchers at Stanford University found that a third of patients they studied with a mild case of COVID-19 had symptoms affecting the digestive system. Another recent study published by researchers in Beijing found that anywhere from 3 to 79 percent of people with COVID-19 develop gastrointestinal symptoms.”

female touching neck and shoulder in pain.
female touching neck and shoulder in pain.

“I think all of us who have had the winter cold or flu have had experience with muscle pain, headache, sore throat,” David Aronoff, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center told NPR, and the website continued: “Given that we’re no longer in the typical cold and flu season, if you’re experiencing muscle pains and other flu-like symptoms, ‘we know that those can be associated with COVID-19,’ he says. ‘And it is very reasonable to get people thinking, you know, maybe I should get tested.'”

Woman suffering from dizziness with difficulty standing up while leaning on wall
Woman suffering from dizziness with difficulty standing up while leaning on wall

“Research published in Annals of Neurology has found that COVID-19 affects the nervous system and can cause a number of neurological symptoms, including dizziness,” reports ENT of Georgia. “The authors report that, ‘Initially thought to be restricted to the respiratory system, we now understand that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) also involves multiple other organs, including the central and peripheral nervous system. The number of recognized neurologic manifestations of SARS‐CoV‐2 infection is rapidly accumulating.'”

RELATED: Signs COVID-19 is in Your Brain

Displeased young woman doesn't want to eat her breakfast
Displeased young woman doesn’t want to eat her breakfast

“When your body is infected by a virus like COVID-19, your appetite can become reduced,” explains Dr. Daniel Atkinson, GP Clinical Lead at Treated.com. “If this is accompanied by a loss of taste and smell it can make wanting to eat or drink really difficult,” he explains. “It’s really important to drink plenty of fluids to help your body combat the virus and minimize the symptoms and even if you don’t feel like it, try to eat something, even if it’s just a snack or a small meal.”

woman with sore throat
woman with sore throat

“A study in China reported that only 14 percent of

Reyna Silver Signs Option Agreement for Medicine Springs Project in Nevada

Figure 1: Medicine Springs Location

Figure 1: Medicine Springs Location
Figure 1: Medicine Springs Location
Figure 1: Medicine Springs Location

Figure 2: Carbonate Replacement Deposit Model for Medicine Springs

Figure 2: Carbonate Replacement Deposit Model for Medicine Springs
Figure 2: Carbonate Replacement Deposit Model for Medicine Springs
Figure 2: Carbonate Replacement Deposit Model for Medicine Springs

Figure 3: NLR Exploration Results Medicine Springs

Figure 3: NLR Exploration Results Medicine Springs
Figure 3: NLR Exploration Results Medicine Springs
Figure 3: NLR Exploration Results Medicine Springs

NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWSWIRE SERVICES

TORONTO and HONG KONG, Oct. 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — (“Reyna or RSLV”) is pleased to announce that it has entered into a Property Option Agreement with Northern Lights Resources Corp. (“NLR”) on the Medicine Springs silver-lead-zinc project (the “Medicine Springs Project”) located in Elko County, Nevada. The Medicine Springs Project comprises 149 unpatented Federal mineral claims covering 1,189 hectares located in the Ruby Mountains Valley just off the famous Carlin Trend.

The Agreement gives Reyna the ability to earn up to an 80% equity interest in the Project (initial 75% with option to purchase an additional 5%) (the “Option”) subject to expending a total of US$2,439,065 on the Project by December 31, 2023. Upon completion of the Option, Northern Lights and Reyna will enter a Joint Venture to continue exploration and development of the Medicine Springs Project, with Reyna acting as the project’s operator. No upfront payments in either cash or shares are due to either NLR or any other party. See below for the detailed terms.

“While Reyna Silver’s main focus will continue to be our flagship Guigui asset, for which we are awaiting permits to commence a 10,000 meter drill campaign this fall, we are delighted to add Medicine Springs to our portfolio of assets,” said Jorge Ramiro Monroy, President and CEO.   Medicine Springs is a Guigui-like CRD system with high-grade silver potential, which lies in Nevada’s CRD elephant country and we are eager to begin applying the same exploration model that led to Arizona Mining’s Taylor Manto and MAG Silver’s Cinco de Mayo discoveries. The Northern Lights team has done an excellent job developing the project to its current near-drill ready stage, which lets us hit the ground running.”

“Figure 1: Medicine Springs Location” is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6669eecf-7969-4d08-8495-284a455679fa

“Figure 2: Carbonate Replacement Deposit Model for Medicine Springs” is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5b835479-ba68-435c-9e1d-ee4d62bb9525

The Medicine Springs Project

The world-famous Carlin Trend runs just east of the Medicine Springs area and prior to acquisition by NLR in 2017, the area was explored for Carlin-style gold potential from 1986-2008 by companies including, US Minerals Exploration, Golden Phoenix, Cominco America and Silver Resources. This exploration work included mapping, sampling, geophysics (CSAMT and IP) and shallow RC drilling. A total of 125 RC holes were drilled on the Project claims (5,380 m with average depth of 43 m, with the deepest hole being 180 m). Limited gold mineralization was found, but significant silver-rich mineralization was cut in several holes including: 33 m @ 90 g/t

Concerning signs in Trump’s care despite word he’s doing OK

After painting a rosy picture Saturday morning of Trump’s condition, a doctor had to later clarify statements on the timeline of his positive diagnosis

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor on Saturday painted a rosy picture of the president’s health as he remains hospitalized for coronavirus treatment. But that assessment was immediately contradicted by a person familiar with Trump’s condition, who said the president was administered supplemental oxygen on Friday at the White House.

As well, Trump’s chief of staff, Mark Meadows, said the president went through a “very concerning” period Friday and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.

The briefing by Navy Commander Dr. Sean Conley and other doctors at Walter Reed Medical Center raised more questions than it answered, as the president’s physician left murky the issue of whether the president needed supplemental oxygen and declined to discuss exactly when he fell ill. Conley, in his briefing, also revealed that Trump began exhibiting “clinical indications” of COVID-19 on Thursday afternoon, earlier than known.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

According to the person familiar with Trump’s condition, Trump was administered oxygen at the White House on Friday before he was transported to the military hospital. The person, who was not authorized to speak publicly, spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Conley had said Trump has been fever-free for 24 hours as he updated the nation on the president’s condition from Walter Reed Saturday afternoon. Trump was admitted Friday after testing positive for the coronavirus and has been undergoing treatment.

READ MORE: Trump going to military hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis

While Conley said the president is not currently on oxygen, he refused to say whether the president had ever been on oxygen, despite repeated questioning.

“Thursday no oxygen. None at this moment. And yesterday with the team, while we were all here, he was not on oxygen,” he said. He said that Trump’s symptoms, including a cough and nasal congestion “are now resolving and improving.”

“He’s in exceptionally good spirits,” said another doctor, Sean Dooley.

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The administration has consistently been less than transparent about the president’s health as the virus spread inside the White House. Aides had declined to share basic health information about the president, including a full accounting of his symptoms, what tests he’s undertaken and the results. The first word that a close aide to Trump had been infected came from the media, not the White House.

In a memo released shortly before midnight, Conley did report that Trump had been treated at the hospital with remdesivir, an antiviral medication, after taking another experimental drug at the White

Signs America’s Opioid Epidemic Might Finally Be Waning | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

SATURDAY, Oct. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Here’s some heartening news on the opioid painkillers front: Abuse of the prescription medicines in the United States fell by more than one-quarter between 2007 and 2018.

“Prior research has shown slight reductions in abuse rates, but our analysis shows we’re tracking statistically significant year-to-year declines in abuse, indicating that the decrease is not an anomaly and truly represents a trend in falling prescription drug abuse levels,” said study author Mario Moric, a biostatistician at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

He and his colleagues analyzed data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey of about 70,000 Americans aged 12 and older who are asked about their use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

For the study, prescription opioid abuse was defined as use without the consent of a physician.

The percentage of survey respondents who said they’d abused prescription opioids in the previous year fell from 4.9% in 2007 to 3.7% in 2018, a 26% decrease.

There were significant declines in prescription opioid abuse from 2012 to 2018, with the exception of 2015, when higher numbers were reported due to a survey redesign introduced that year, the researchers said.

The findings were to be presented Saturday at the virtual annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

“We believe the message of the dangers of opioid use without supervision of a medical professional is finally getting through and changing people’s mindset and behavior,” Moric said in a meeting news release.

“Pain medications such as opioids are an important resource in the treatment and care of patients, but they are not a cure-all,” said study co-author Dr. Asokumar Buvanendran, chair of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Committee on Pain Medicine and executive vice chair of anesthesiology at Rush University Medical Center.

“Since opioids have risks and can be highly addictive, they should be used only under the supervision of a physician who can consider their safety and how the medication will affect a patient over time,” Buvanendran said in the release. “Prescribers and patients are now better armed with the information they need to make educated choices in pain management.”

Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Trump Signs Medicare Loan Relief Bill Delaying Repayments

President Trump on Thursday morning signed a bill to keep the federal government running through December 11. This “continuing resolution” (CR), which was approved by the Senate Wednesday on an 84-10 vote, according to The New York Times, includes provisions to delay repayment by physicians of pandemic-related Medicare loans and to reduce the loans’ interest rate.

In an earlier news release, the American Medical Association (AMA) reported that Congress and the White House had agreed to include the provisions on Medicare loans in the CR.

Under the Medicare Accelerated and Advance Payments (AAP) program, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) advanced money to physicians who were financially impacted by the pandemic. The program, created in March, was suspended in late April.

Physicians who received the Medicare loans were supposed to start paying them back 120 days after they were made. CMS planned to recoup the advances by offsetting them against Medicare claims payments due to physicians. Practices had up to 210 days (7 months) to repay the loans through this process before being asked to repay them directly with interest of 10.25%.

For the practices that received these advances, that meant their Medicare cash flow was scheduled to dry up, starting in August. However, CMS quietly abstained from collecting these payments when they came due, according to Modern Healthcare.

New Terms

Under the new loan repayment terms in the CR, recoupment of the disbursed funds is postponed until 365 days after the date on which a practice received the money. The balance is due by September 2022.

The amount to be recouped from each claim is reduced from 100% to 25% of the claim for the first 11 months and to 50% of claims withheld for an additional 6 months. If the loan is not repaid in full by then, the provider must pay the balance with interest of 4%.

More than 80% of the $100 billion that CMS loaned to healthcare providers through May 2 went to hospitals, Modern Healthcare calculated. Of the remainder, specialty or multispecialty practices received $3.5 billion, internal medicine specialists got $24 million, family physicians were loaned $15 million, and federally qualified health centers received $20 million.

In the AMA’s news release, AMA President Susan Bailey, MD, who assumed the post in June, called the original loan repayment plan an “economic sword hanging over physician practices.”

For more news, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Moderna COVID-19 vaccine appears safe, shows signs of working in older adults – study

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Results from an early safety study of Moderna Inc’s coronavirus vaccine candidate in older adults showed that it produced virus-neutralizing antibodies at levels similar to those seen in younger adults, with side effects roughly on par with high-dose flu shots, researchers said on Tuesday.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, offers a more complete picture of the vaccine’s safety in older adults, a group at increased risk of severe complications from COVID-19.

The findings are reassuring because immunity tends to weaken with age, Dr. Evan Anderson, one of the study’s lead researchers from Emory University in Atlanta, said in a phone interview.

The study was an extension of Moderna’s Phase I safety trial, first conducted in individuals aged 18-55. It tested two doses of Moderna’s vaccine – 25 micrograms and 100 micrograms – in 40 adults aged 56 to 70 and 71 and older.

Overall, the team found that in older adults who received two injections of the 100 microgram dose 28 days apart, the vaccine produced immune responses roughly in line with those seen in younger adults.

Moderna is already testing the higher dose in a large Phase III trial, the final stage before seeking emergency authorization or approval.

Side effects, which included headache, fatigue, body aches, chills and injection site pain, were deemed mainly mild to moderate.

In at least two cases, however, volunteers had severe reactions.

One developed a grade three fever, which is classified as 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit (39°C) or above, after receiving the lower vaccine dose. Another developed fatigue so severe it temporarily prevented daily activities, Anderson said.

Typically, side effects occurred soon after receiving the vaccine and resolved quickly, he said.

“This is similar to what a lot of older adults are going to experience with the high dose influenza vaccine,” Anderson said. “They might feel off or have a fever.”

Norman Hulme, a 65-year-old senior multimedia developer at Emory who took the lower dose of the vaccine, said he felt compelled to take part in the trial after watching first responders in New York and Washington State fight the virus.

“I really had no side effects at all,” said Hulme, who grew up in the New York area.

Hulme said he was aware Moderna’s vaccine employed a new technology, and that there might be a risk in taking it, but said, “somebody had to do it.”

Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen; Editing by Bill Berkrot

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Moderna COVID-19 vaccine appears safe, shows signs of working in older adults

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Results from an early safety study of Moderna Inc’s coronavirus vaccine candidate in older adults showed that it produced virus-neutralizing antibodies at levels similar to those seen in younger adults, with side effects roughly on par with high-dose flu shots, researchers said on Tuesday.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, offers a more complete picture of the vaccine’s safety in older adults, a group at increased risk of severe complications from COVID-19.

The findings are reassuring because immunity tends to weaken with age, Dr. Evan Anderson, one of the study’s lead researchers from Emory University in Atlanta, said in a phone interview.

The study was an extension of Moderna’s Phase I safety trial, first conducted in individuals aged 18-55. It tested two doses of Moderna’s vaccine – 25 micrograms and 100 micrograms – in 40 adults aged 56 to 70 and 71 and older.

Overall, the team found that in older adults who received two injections of the 100 microgram dose 28 days apart, the vaccine produced immune responses roughly in line with those seen in younger adults.

Moderna is already testing the higher dose in a large Phase III trial, the final stage before seeking emergency authorization or approval.

Side effects, which included headache, fatigue, body aches, chills and injection site pain, were deemed mainly mild to moderate.

In at least two cases, however, volunteers had severe reactions.

One developed a grade three fever, which is classified as 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit (39°C) or above, after receiving the lower vaccine dose. Another developed fatigue so severe it temporarily prevented daily activities, Anderson said.

Typically, side effects occurred soon after receiving the vaccine and resolved quickly, he said.

“This is similar to what a lot of older adults are going to experience with the high dose influenza vaccine,” Anderson said. “They might feel off or have a fever.”

Norman Hulme, a 65-year-old senior multimedia developer at Emory who took the lower dose of the vaccine, said he felt compelled to take part in the trial after watching first responders in New York and Washington State fight the virus.

“I really had no side effects at all,” said Hulme, who grew up in the New York area.

Hulme said he was aware Moderna’s vaccine employed a new technology, and that there might be a risk in taking it, but said, “somebody had to do it.”

(Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

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