Showing: 1 - 5 of 5 RESULTS

Trump Required Walter Reed Staff To Sign Nondisclosure Agreement In 2019

KEY POINTS

  • During a trip to Walter Reed on Nov. 16, 2019, Trump allegedly required both physicians and nonmedical staff to sign an NDA
  • It’s still unknown whether the president required the Walter Reed staff to sign a nondisclosure in his most recent visit
  • Doctors tending to patients are prohibited by federal law from disclosing patients’ personal health information without consent

President Trump has required personnel at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to sign a nondisclosure agreement before treating him. 

During a trip to Walter Reed on Nov. 16, 2019, Trump required both physicians and nonmedical staff to sign an NDA. At least two doctors at Walter Reed refused to sign the NDAs and were not permitted to have any involvement in the president’s care, NBC News reported. 

It’s still unknown whether the president required the Walter Reed staff to sign a nondisclosure in his most recent visit. 

Doctors tending to patients are prohibited by federal law from disclosing patient’s personal health information without consent. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act protects patients’ confidential health information, which raises the question of why Trump would ask staff members at Walter Reed to sign an NDA.

“Any physician caring for the President is bound by patient-physician confidentiality guaranteed under HIPAA, and I’m not going to comment on internal procedures beyond that,” White House Deputy Press Secretary Judd Deere said in a statement.

Transparency about Trump’s health has been a major concern since the president tested positive for COVID-19. Trump, his administration, and the physicians attending to him painted a murky picture of how the president is recovering. Dr. Sean Conley, the president’s physician, has refused to answer key questions, such as when Trump last tested negative for the virus and whether the illness has caused him to develop respiratory problems.

Conley continues to cite HIPAA when dodging questions on the president’s health. “We’ve done routine standard imaging. I’m just not at liberty to discuss,” Conley said on Monday. 

Conley’s written updates on Trump’s health have included the note “I release the following information with the permission of President Donald J. Trump.”

Source Article

India’s coronavirus death toll passes 100,000 with no sign of an end

BENGALURU/NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s death toll from the novel coronavirus rose past 100,000 on Saturday, only the third country in the world to reach that bleak milestone, after the United States and Brazil, and its epidemic shows no sign of abating.

Total deaths rose to 100,842, the health ministry said, while the tally of infections climbed to 6.47 million after a daily increase in cases of 79,476. India now has the highest rate of daily increase in infections in the world.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government, faced with a collapsing economy after imposing a tough lockdown to try to stem the spread of the virus in late March, is pushing ahead with a full opening of the country.

Cinemas were allowed to re-open at half capacity this week and authorities can decide to re-open schools from the middle of this month.

Heading into winter and the holiday season, including the Hindu festival of Diwali next month, the world’s second most populous country could see a jump in cases, health experts said.

“We have seen some recent slowdown of the virus curve but this may be a local peak, there may be another coming,” said Bhramar Mukherjee, a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Michigan.

She said data showed a little over 7% of the population of 1.3 billion had been exposed to the virus, meaning India was still far from any sort of herd immunity.

The number of cases could rise to 12.2 million by the end of the year but the rate of spread would depend on how effective measures such as social distancing were, she said.

“So it will continue like a slow burning coil, that is my hope, and we have to play the long game to stop it from being a wildfire.”

GRAPHIC: Covid-19 cases vs recoveries: India, Brazil and U.S. –

DATA QUESTIONED

The United States, Brazil and India together account for nearly 45% of all COVID-19 deaths globally.

Death rates in India, however, have been significantly lower than in those other two countries, raising questions about the accuracy of its data.

India has, on average, less than one death from the disease for every 10,000 people while the United States and Brazil have seen six deaths per 10,000.

U.S. President Donald Trump, defending his administration’s handling of the pandemic in this week’s presidential debate, said countries such as India were under-reporting deaths.

Shashank Tripathi, of the Centre for Infectious Disease Research at the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru, acknowledged there could be problems with the data though India’s young population might help explain the lower death rate.

“In India, even without a pandemic, all deaths are not properly registered,” Tripathi said.

“I’m not very confident that the mortality rates reflect the right numbers, though the younger demographic has given us some advantage.”

Representatives of the health ministry and the Indian Council of Medical Research did not immediately respond to calls or emails for

Troubling Sleep Disorder in Athletes a Sign of CTE?

Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is surprisingly common in athletes and may signal chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) caused by brainstem tau and Lewy body pathologies, new research suggests.

CTE is a neurodegenerative disorder linked to years of repetitive head impacts from playing professional football and other contact sports.

“Repetitive head impacts may damage sleep-relevant brainstem nuclei and lead to REM sleep behavior disorder,” senior author Thor Stein, MD, PhD, neuropathologist at VA Boston Healthcare in Massachusetts, said in a webinar hosted by the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

“This is something both athletes and their doctors need to be aware of,” added Stein, who is an assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

The findings were published online September 17 in Acta Neuropathologica.

Surprising Findings

In RBD, the paralysis that normally occurs during REM sleep is incomplete or absent, causing people to act out their dreams by talking, flailing their arms and legs, punching, kicking and other behaviors while asleep. 

“The disorder often comes to medical attention when there is an injury or potential for injury to the individual or the individual’s bed partner,” Stein noted.

To investigate ties between CTE and RBD, the researchers analyzed the brains of 247 deceased male athletes who played contact sports; the brains were donated to the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation (VA-BU-CLF) Brain Bank.

The athletes died at a mean age of 63 years. They all had a neuropathological diagnosis of CTE. Their relatives provided information on sleep.

Nearly one third of these athletes (n = 80, 32%) with CTE displayed symptoms characteristic of RBD when they were alive. “That really surprised us,” said Stein. “This is about 30 times more than what’s reported in the general population, where it has been estimated to be present in about 1% of people,” he noted.

In addition, there was a clear dose-response effect. Athletes with CTE and RBD had played contact sports for significantly more years than their peers without RBD (18.3 vs 15.1 years; P = .02). 

“The odds of reporting RBD symptoms increased about 4% per year of play,” first author Jason Adams, an MD/PhD student now at the University of California San Diego, said in a statement.

New Insight

The results also point to a potential cause for RBD.

Compared with athletes who had CTE and no RBD, those with CTE and RBD were four times more likely to have tau pathology within brainstem nuclei involved in REM sleep (odds ratio [OR], 3.96; 95% CI, 1.43 – 10.96; P = .008). Athletes with CTE and RBD were also more likely to have Lewy body pathology (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.18 – 4.72; P = .02).

“Contrary to our expectations, tau pathology in the raphe nuclei was more strongly associated with RBD than Lewy body pathology, suggesting that tau pathology is more likely to lead to sleep dysfunction in CTE,” Stein said.

Christopher John Nowinski, PhD, cofounder and CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation, said this study

Winnipeg dentist says teeth-grinding a sign of pandemic stress



a blurry photo of a toothbrush: A Winnipeg dentist says he's seen an influx of patients complaining of grinding their teeth -- likely due to pandemic-related stress.


© Getty Images
A Winnipeg dentist says he’s seen an influx of patients complaining of grinding their teeth — likely due to pandemic-related stress.

A Winnipeg dentist says he’s seen a significant uptick in people grinding their teeth in recent months, and there’s an obvious culprit: stress caused by COVID-19.

Dr. Ken Hamin of Reflections Dental Health Centre told 680 CJOB his office is seeing unprecedented numbers of patients coming in with the same problem.

“It’s the first time in probably 30 years that I’ve seen a trend — and the only thing I can account it towards is the stress of COVID-19,” said Hamin.

“We’ve seen a huge increase, probably three to four patients a week, coming in and saying, ‘I’ve started clenching or grinding’, or ‘I’ve got headaches.'”

Hamin said a night guard helps people reduce teeth grinding since it often occurs while we’re asleep, but sometimes, patients will be referred to a sleep study.

Read more: 11 million Canadians could experience ‘high levels of stress’ due to COVID-19: Health Canada

Winnipeg psychologist Dr. Syras Derksen told Global News that added stress during the pandemic is normal — especially when traditional holiday gatherings people look forward to — like Thanksgiving — are being advised against this year.

“I think the first thing to know is that it’s OK to grieve,” said Derksen.

“It’s important to go through a process of emotions as you realize that things are going to be different — that you’re going to have plan things different.

“You’re hoping that it’s going to be the same… but then as that realization sets in, you’re going to experience loss and you’re going to go through a series of emotions — and it’s OK to allow those to happen, and you’ll get through them.”

Source Article

The COVID crunch: Winnipeg dentist says teeth-grinding a sign of pandemic stress – Winnipeg

A Winnipeg dentist says he’s seen a significant uptick in people grinding their teeth in recent months, and there’s an obvious culprit: stress caused by COVID-19.

Dr. Ken Hamin of Reflections Dental Health Centre told 680 CJOB his office is seeing unprecedented numbers of patients coming in with the same problem.

“It’s the first time in probably 30 years that I’ve seen a trend — and the only thing I can account it towards is the stress of COVID-19,” said Hamin.

“We’ve seen a huge increase, probably three to four patients a week, coming in and saying, ‘I’ve started clenching or grinding’, or ‘I’ve got headaches.’”

Hamin said a night guard helps people reduce teeth grinding since it often occurs while we’re asleep, but sometimes, patients will be referred to a sleep study.

Story continues below advertisement

Winnipeg psychologist Dr. Syras Derksen told Global News that added stress during the pandemic is normal — especially when traditional holiday gatherings people look forward to — like Thanksgiving — are being advised against this year.

“I think the first thing to know is that it’s OK to grieve,” said Derksen.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

“It’s important to go through a process of emotions as you realize that things are going to be different — that you’re going to have plan things different.

“You’re hoping that it’s going to be the same… but then as that realization sets in, you’re going to experience loss and you’re going to go through a series of emotions — and it’s OK to allow those to happen, and you’ll get through them.”

Story continues below advertisement



© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Source Article