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Alcon Celebrates World Sight Day 2020 and Continues Commitment to Improving Worldwide Access to Eye Care

  • Ongoing donation efforts deliver equipment and medical supplies needed for increasingly important eye care services and procedures to help underserved patients during the pandemic

  • Associates around the world participate in the Steps for Sight Challenge to help improve access to quality eye care

  • New Alcon Foundation video PSA highlights the importance of eye health screenings, premiering at this year’s American Academy of Optometry (AAO) annual meeting

Alcon (SIX/NYSE: ALC), the global leader in eye care dedicated to helping people see brilliantly, today celebrates World Sight Day through its corporate giving and company-led initiatives focused on improving access to quality eye care. In the spirit of this year’s theme, “Hope in Sight,” Alcon associates will help spark donations to global nonprofit organizations that advance eye health. The goal is to support people around the world in need of eye care, particularly as eye health issues, including vision loss, myopia, cataracts, refractive errors and more, have emerged or worsened due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“This year, our Alcon team has seen firsthand how the COVID-19 pandemic has made access to quality eye care even more challenging for communities across the globe,” said David J. Endicott, Chief Executive Officer, Alcon. “Now more than ever, Alcon is proud to partner with nonprofit eye health organizations who are working toward a common goal of improving access to eye care, including offering free eye surgeries and eye care resources to patients, as well as providing training and education to eye care providers across the world. Through these impactful initiatives, we can help improve people’s vision and inspire hope in sight.”

Celebrated annually, World Sight Day—coordinated by the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB)—is an international day of awareness to bring attention to the global issue of avoidable blindness and visual impairment. Alcon has a long-standing history of donating surgical equipment and medical supplies to NGOs and hospitals providing care to underserved patients. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many necessary eye surgeries and treatments were delayed, causing a backlog of surgeries and leaving people’s vision at risk for worsened conditions. Cornerstone Assistance Network’s Cataract Clinic— the nation’s first free cataract facility for the uninsured, located in the Dallas-Fort Worth area—saw an uptick in patient requests for cataract surgeries since the pandemic began. This World Sight Day, Alcon continues to lend support to Cornerstone Cataract Clinic by supporting surgical services for uninsured patients.

Around the world, Alcon associates are also participating in a variety of activities that support eye health awareness for World Sight Day. Most notably, the Steps for Sight Challenge is a global company initiative that challenges 2,020 associates to take 10,000 steps on World Sight Day to raise a total of $25,000 for three global eye health nonprofit organizations—long-time partner Orbis, Optometry Giving Sight and one surprise recipient to be chosen by an Alcon site.

This year, Alcon has created a video trailer as a public service announcement (PSA) to remind people of the importance of eye health and encourage scheduling

As Trump is treated for coronavirus, the press can’t lose sight of the nationwide story

A version of this article first appeared in the “Reliable Sources” newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.



a bus that is sitting on the side of a car: President Donald Trump wears a protective mask while giving a thumbs up as he is driven in a motorcade past supporters outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump briefly left his hospital in a car to greet supporters gathered outside, after posting a video on Twitter saying he was about to make a surprise visit. Photographer: Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images
President Donald Trump wears a protective mask while giving a thumbs up as he is driven in a motorcade past supporters outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump briefly left his hospital in a car to greet supporters gathered outside, after posting a video on Twitter saying he was about to make a surprise visit. Photographer: Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The president’s health crisis is undoubtedly the biggest single story in the United States right now. But it should not blot out the broader coronavirus story.

Along with the cooler temperatures that drive people indoors, there are worrying trends across the US. “In many states, local and state leaders are reporting worrying milestones,” CNN’s Christina Maxouris and Jason Hanna reported over the weekend.

Wisconsin is emerging as a hotspot: The state reported 2,892 new cases on Saturday, “a record number.” In Kentucky, the governor said his state “shattered” the previous case record. In New York City, the mayor said he wanted to lock down certain hot spots in the city.

Overall, “in the past five days of reporting nationwide, there have been a total of 232,657 cases of coronavirus reported, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That is the most cases in a five day period reported since mid-August,” per CNN’s Chuck Johnston.

The daily new-case count surpassed 50,000 on Friday. And on Saturday, there were 49,994 new cases reported nationwide, according to JHU. The virus is tightening its grip on many parts of the continental US. And the fall is just beginning, so expect that grip to get even tighter. The president’s diagnosis should be reported in that context…

>> Big picture: More than 7.3 million people have been infected nationwide, according to Johns Hopkins data. More than 209,000 people have died.

Trump said “the end of the pandemic is in sight”

That’s what he said in a pre-recorded video on Thursday for the Al Smith Dinner. Based on what we know about the timeline of his illness, he was already infected when he made the faulty claim.

In a new video, posted to Twitter on Sunday evening, Trump said “I learned a lot about Covid” by getting sick. He went on to say “I get it, and I understand it, and it’s a very interesting thing, and I’m going to be letting you know about it.” Right after he recorded that comment, he went for a ride…

The “double take”

Ana Cabrera was anchoring on CNN, interviewing James Clapper and David Gergen, when there was a surprise convoy of vehicles on the live camera shot from outside Walter Reed. Cabrera told me she did a “double take” as she saw the president waving to his supporters from his armored SUV. “Hey, you guys,” she said as she interrupted