Showing: 1 - 8 of 8 RESULTS

Does Trump Have The Side Effects From Steroid That Treats COVID?

KEY POINTS

  • Prolonged use of or using too much dexamethasone can cause gland problems and increase a patient’s risk of cancer
  • WHO revised its COVID-19 treatment guidelines, saying corticosteroids are effective in reducing the risk of death
  • Trump was given dexamethasone because his blood oxygen level dipped to 93%

President Donald Trump has been bragging about the medications he was given to treat his COVID-19 infection – two of which are still being evaluated for safety and efficacy. But the third drug he was given has been around a long time, and doctors are well aware of its side effects.

The drug is dexamethasone, a powerful anti-inflammatory steroid that is being used to treat lung problems in COVID-19 patients.

Trump was given the steroid after his blood oxygen levels dropped to 93% – healthy levels are 95% to 100%  — following his diagnosis. The use of dexamethasone indicates Trump’s condition may have been more serious than his doctors let on since researchers had been using it on only the most critically ill patients.

Research published in August by the Journal of Hospital Medicine found giving the steroid to patients who are not that sick can endanger their health further.

The Mayo Clinic lists 19 known side effects from dexamethasone, including aggression, irritability and trouble thinking. It also can lead to a “false or unusual sense of well-being.” (Trump has been tweeting and issuing statements saying he is feeling “great,” and in at least one instance said he was feeling better than he had been for years.)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday the president appeared to be in an “altered mental state,” and Democrats Friday introduced legislation to set up a commission on invoking the 25th Amendment, which can be used to remove a president who is judged unfit to perform his duties.

Mayo warns prolonged use of or using too much dexamethasone can cause gland problems and increase a patient’s risk of cancer. It also can lead to osteoporosis and weight gain.

Trump’s age, 74, and weight, as well as his sex, put him at higher risk of complications from COVID-19.

The World Health Organization this week revised COVID-19 treatment guidelines, promoting corticosteroids as an effective COVID-19 treatment. Five papers published by the Journal of the American Medical Association examined data from seven clinical trials involving three steroids – dexamethasone, hydrocortisone and methylprednisolone – given to 1,700 patients and concluded the drugs were effective in reducing the risk of death.

Source Article

Dexamethasone side effects and risks, the steroid Trump was treated with

Trump’s doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., cited the positive research when they disclosed that they prescribed the steroid after Trump’s oxygen levels concerningly dropped to 93 percent. Healthy blood oxygen levels range from 95 to 100 percent.

For covid-19 patients on ventilators or receiving oxygen, taking dexamethasone increased their chance of survival, according to the research published in July. But patients receiving dexamethasone who didn’t require ventilation or oxygen fared no better than patients on the normal course of treatment.

In fact, giving dexamethasone to coronavirus patients who are not at risk of severe illness could further endanger their health, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

In its guidelines, the National Institutes of Health recommends against using dexamethasone for covid-19 patients who do not require supplemental oxygen.

Dexamethasone is not often prescribed toward the start of a patient’s infection, experts say, because it can suppress the immune system’s ability to ward off the virus. But Trump’s doctors opted to administer the steroid less than two days after Trump publicly disclosed that he had tested positive.

“We decided that in this case the potential benefits early on in the course probably outweighed the risks,” Conley said Sunday.

Dexamethasone can also have concerning side effects, ranging from blood clots, blurred vision, and headaches to “psychic derangements,” such as insomnia, mood swings and “frank psychotic manifestations,” according to the drug label.

Doctors know what to expect with dexamethasone because the drug itself is not new. The steroid, which is used to treat asthma, Crohn’s disease, IBS and some cancers, is 60 years old and ubiquitous.

“It’s cheap as borscht, as my grandparents would say,” Isaac Bogoch, an infectious-disease specialist at Toronto General Hospital, previously told The Washington Post. “It’s widely available. Every single physician on the planet that practices hospital-based medicine is comfortable using this drug.”

Another well-known, therapeutic effect of the drug is a sensation of euphoria. But the relief a patient may feel should not be confused with physical improvement, said Paul B. Bach, the director of the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Before departing Walter Reed on Monday, Trump boasted on Twitter that he felt better than he did two decades ago.

“Feeling really good! Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life,” he wrote after his brief hospitalization for the disease that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

Patients who are prescribed a steroid like dexamethasone can over-exaggerate how well they feel, Bach told The Post. But he advises patients who take the steroid not to be deceived by the reprieve and overexert themselves.

“Having taken this myself, for a herniated disc, I felt like a million bucks,” Bach said, “but actually I was barely able to move.”

Trump was prescribed the drug in concert with other medicine — supplemental oxygen, a monoclonal antibody cocktail and a five-day course of the intravenous antiviral remdesivir.

It’s

Trump steroid treatment for COVID-19 raises potential side effect risk

By Carl O’Donnell and Deena Beasley

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump is being treated for COVID-19 with a steroid that is recommended for severe cases of the illness and that comes with risks of serious side effects, including mood swings, aggression and confusion.

Trump’s medical team on Sunday said the president was started on dexamethasone, a generic steroid long and widely used to reduce inflammation associated with other diseases. The steroid was begun after Trump experienced low oxygen levels.

White House officials have painted a rosy picture of Trump’s condition, saying he could be discharged from the hospital as soon as Monday. But dexamethasone has typically been reserved for more serious cases.

A study in June that was hailed as a breakthrough showed that use of the steroid reduced death rates by around a third among the most severely ill hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Dexamethasone is used to treat immune system disorders, inflammatory conditions, breathing issues and other conditions by decreasing the body’s natural defensive response, which can overreact causing additional problems.

The Infectious Disease Society of America says dexamethasone is beneficial to people with critical or severe COVID-19 who require extra oxygen. But studies show the drug may be harmful in people with milder COVID-19 because it can suppress their natural immune response.

In addition, side effects can include physical problems such as blurred vision and irregular heartbeat, as well as personality changes and difficulty thinking, according to the International Myeloma Foundation.

“Steroids are always very dangerous medications to use,” said Edward Jones-Lopez, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

“That is why it (dexamethasone) is used in severe to critical patients… There can be neuropsychiatric side effects. These are medications that we use very, very carefully.”

However, dexamethasone is a common steroid used in many patients who have low oxygen as a result of COVID-19 and is typically harmless, said Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

(Reporting by Carl O’Donnell; Editing by Peter Henderson and Bill Berkrot)

Source Article

What are the side effects of Trump’s coronavirus treatment regimen?

Following President Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis, he has been given an experimental antibody treatment not yet approved for broad use, a course of an antiviral drug shown to help hospitalized coronavirus patients and a steroid typically used for severe COVID-19 cases. 

White House physician Sean Conley on Friday afternoon announced Trump was given a single 8-gram dose of biotechnology company Regeneron’s experimental antibody cocktail named REGN-COV2. The drug has not yet been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in any patients. He was also taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and aspirin. 


Our country is in a historic fight against the Coronavirus. Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


Regeneron last week said preliminary results from an ongoing clinical trial of the drug showed the treatment improved symptoms and reduced levels of the virus in nonhospitalized patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 with no serious side effects. 

While Regeneron did not detail what the potential side effects of the treatment could be, mild reactions to IV-therapies include fever, chills and fatigue. More serious symptoms include chest pain and shortness of breath, according to Medical Xpress

Regeneron’s findings came from a study of 275 people who were treated after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. The detailed data from the trials has not yet been made public or peer-reviewed. 

After Trump was hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday evening, the president’s team confirmed he began a course of remdesivir, an antiviral drug developed by Gilead Sciences shown to help moderately ill COVID-19 patients recover more quickly from the disease by making it hard for the virus to replicate. In May, the drug received emergency use authorization from the FDA for those who are hospitalized with COVID-19. 

Side effects from remdesivir can include nausea, vomiting, chills and elevated liver enzymes, which could potentially cause liver damage. 

On Sunday, Conley said the president was being treated with the steroid dexamethasone after Trump’s blood oxygen level dropped twice, raising concerns about the president’s condition as the drug is typically reserved for seriously ill patients. 


WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CORONAVIRUS RIGHT NOW

TRUMP’S AGE AND WEIGHT COULD PUT HIM AT RISK OF COVID-19 COMPLICATIONS

THERE SHOULD BE ‘ENORMOUS’ CONTACT TRACING OF PEOPLE AROUND TRUMP, SAYS PUBLIC HEALTH EXPERT

FACE MASKS WERE CONTROVERSIAL IN THE 1918 PANDEMIC, TOO. HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED

COVID-19 TEST THAT PRODUCES RESULTS IN 15 MINUTES APPROVED IN EUROPE

90 PERCENT OF CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS EXPERIENCE SIDE EFFECTS AFTER RECOVERY, STUDY SAYS


The drug was found to benefit critically ill COVID-19 patients in trials in the United Kingdom. It’s used to head off an immune system overreaction to the virus that can kill severely ill patients. 

The inexpensive steroid is commonly used to treat inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, lupus, ulcerative colitis and breathing disorders. 

Dexamethasone can cause several potential side effects, including mental health problems such as aggression, agitation, anxiety, irritability and depression. 

“Dexamethasone

Trump Steroid Treatment for COVID-19 Raises Potential Side Effect Risk | Top News

By Carl O’Donnell and Deena Beasley

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump is being treated for COVID-19 with a steroid that is recommended for severe cases of the illness and that comes with risks of serious side effects, including mood swings, aggression and confusion.

Trump’s medical team on Sunday said the president was started on dexamethasone, a generic steroid long and widely used to reduce inflammation associated with other diseases. The steroid was begun after Trump experienced low oxygen levels.

White House officials have painted a rosy picture of Trump’s condition, saying he could be discharged from the hospital as soon as Monday. But dexamethasone has typically been reserved for more serious cases.

A study in June that was hailed as a breakthrough showed that use of the steroid reduced death rates by around a third among the most severely ill hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Dexamethasone is used to treat immune system disorders, inflammatory conditions, breathing issues and other conditions by decreasing the body’s natural defensive response, which can overreact causing additional problems.

The Infectious Disease Society of America says dexamethasone is beneficial to people with critical or severe COVID-19 who require extra oxygen. But studies show the drug may be harmful in people with milder COVID-19 because it can suppress their natural immune response.

In addition, side effects can include physical problems such as blurred vision and irregular heartbeat, as well as personality changes and difficulty thinking, according to the International Myeloma Foundation.

“Steroids are always very dangerous medications to use,” said Edward Jones-Lopez, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

“That is why it (dexamethasone) is used in severe to critical patients… There can be neuropsychiatric side effects. These are medications that we use very, very carefully.”

However, dexamethasone is a common steroid used in many patients who have low oxygen as a result of COVID-19 and is typically harmless, said Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

(Reporting by Carl O’Donnell; Editing by Peter Henderson and Bill Berkrot)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

Source Article

Bytes and Pieces of Care; Overlooked ‘Side Effect’; Poverty and Cancer Mortality

The return of the house call: Providing cancer care in bytes and pieces. (ASCO Connection)

Bipartisan Senate legislation requiring Medicaid to cover costs for routine care of clinical trial participants would “expand access to clinical trials and improve the quality of cancer research,” according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

The FDA issued final guidance on labeling for breast implants, aimed at improving communication with patients about potential risks and complications.

The often-overlooked “side effect” of cancer treatment: depression. (CNN)

The Lymphoma Research Foundation announced a $10-million initiative to support clinical research and improve care for follicular lymphoma, which accounts for 20%-30% of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

The first patient reported to be cured of HIV has died of leukemia. (Fox News)

More evidence that certain dietary factors (folate, magnesium, and dairy products) may help lower the risk of colon cancer. (Gut)

U.S. counties that have chronically high rates of poverty also have more cancer deaths. (American Association for Cancer Research)

A breast cancer survivor talks about a new type of reconstructive surgery that may overcome the numbness and restore feeling to the chest after a mastectomy. (Today)

The American Cancer Society provides some facts about reasons for callbacks after mammography and tries to allay some misconceptions and fears.

Congressional report alleges that Celgene repeatedly raised prices of its blockbuster hematology drug lenalidomide (Revlimid) for no reason other than to boost revenue. (FiercePharma)

The recent death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg provided the backdrop for a review of pancreatic cancer’s poor prognosis. (American Association for Cancer Research)

  • author['full_name']

    Charles Bankhead is senior editor for oncology and also covers urology, dermatology, and ophthalmology. He joined MedPage Today in 2007. Follow

Source Article

NBC’s Kristen Dahlgren Opens Up About the Hardest Side Effect of Breast Cancer Treatment

Photo credit: NBC - Getty Images
Photo credit: NBC – Getty Images

From Prevention

  • Kristen Dahlgren, 48, just shared the most difficult side effect of her stage 2 breast cancer treatment.

  • The NBC News correspondent said she’s lost feeling in her chest after having a mastectomy.

  • Dahlgren, who is currently in remission, plans to have a resensation procedure along with tissue reconstruction surgery later this year.

Kristen Dahlgren has been living with a side effect she never expected following her stage 2 breast cancer diagnosis last year. The NBC News correspondent shared in an essay for Today that she experiences “discomfort and numbness” in her chest following a mastectomy.

“Of all of the side effects of treatment, for me, this may be the hardest,” Dahlgren wrote, adding that the lack of feeling is a constant reminder of everything she’s been through. “It hits me every time I take a deep breath, or get a hug, and especially when my daughter lays her head on my chest. That’s when I really ‘feel’ the toll the breast cancer has taken.”

Dahlgren was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer in July 2019 after noticing an unusual dent in her breast. Although she had no family history of breast cancer and had received normal mammogram results just five months earlier, she decided to get another test. Shortly after, her breast cancer diagnosis was confirmed.

To treat the disease quickly, she underwent chemotherapy during the coronavirus pandemic and announced on Twitter she was cancer-free in April 2020. “I feel great,” she told Hoda Kotb and Savannah Guthrie in a new interview with Today. “I’m praying every day that my health holds out.”

Dahlgren is now entering the third phase of her recovery: breast reconstruction surgery. She also plans to undergo a “resensation” procedure that will hopefully help her regain feeling in her chest.

Her doctor, Constance Chen, M.D., a reconstructive plastic surgeon who helps breast cancer patients experiencing this side effect, “cannot say it works for everyone, but she says when it works, it works well.”

“Before breast cancer, I never realized that women who have mastectomies lose feeling in their chests. It makes sense, of course—since the nerves are cut during the surgery—but it’s not something that is often talked about,” she wrote in the Today essay. “For me, I’d really just love to feel a hug—or my little girl cuddled up against me on the couch. If [the procedure] doesn’t work, life certainly goes on, but like I have so often in the past year, for now, I am hanging on to hope.”

Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE gifts. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

You Might Also Like

Source Article

U.S. adds 43K COVID-19 cases; side effects seen in vaccine trials

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Clinical trials for a potential COVID-19 vaccine have seen multiple volunteers come down with intense side effects, and a new study has identified President Donald Trump as the world’s greatest single source of misinformation about the crisis.

CNBC reported Thursday that five human subjects testing vaccines by Moderna and Pfizer experienced strong side effects that included high fever, chills, body aches and severe headaches.

The volunteers said the symptoms were uncomfortable and severe, but they disappeared after a short period. One, a 44-year-old computational biologist in Utah, said he was bedridden with a fever of more than 101 degrees and other symptoms after taking a second dose during the final stage of Moderna’s trials.

The symptoms disappeared after 12 hours, he said.

Moderna and Pfizer have acknowledged in published results from earlier trials the vaccines could induce side effects similar to the symptoms of mild COVID-19.

Another late-stage trial for a vaccine developed by AstraZeneca is still on hold in the United States, but Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn has declined to explain the reason.

AstraZeneca halted its trial worldwide weeks ago after one volunteer developed a serious illness. The testing has since resumed overseas but not in the United States.

“I can’t speak to confidential commercial information,” Hahn said Wednesday. “We will look at any and all data, and we will make a decision when we have the data available to us regarding any issue, whether it’s safety or effectiveness.”

The United States added 42,800 COVID-19 cases and about 950 deaths on Wednesday, according to updated data from Johns Hopkins University.

The data show there have been 7.24 million cases and 207,000 deaths nationwide since the outbreak began early this year.

A study at Cornell University said a thorough review of almost 40 million English-language news reports worldwide identified Trump as the single-largest driver of misinformation about the pandemic.

The main author of the study, which was first reported by The New York Times, called the results a “big surprise.”

“That’s concerning in that there are real-world dire health implications,” Cornell Alliance for Science director Sarah Evanega, the study’s lead author, told the Times.

In Mississippi, Gov. Tate Reeves allowed a statewide mask order to expire and signed a new order calling for continued face coverings in schools and certain businesses.

Reeves ordered mandatory mask usage in August after initial resistance to the idea.

“I still believe masks work,” Reeves said in a statement. “It’s the wise thing to do.”

Cases and hospitalizations in Mississippi have declined in recent weeks after peaking in midsummer. The state now averages about 500 new cases per day.

In Washington state, officials say they’re looking into an outbreak linked to a resort and spa about 40 miles east of Seattle. Cases involving staff and guests have been linked to the Salish Lodge & Spa in Snoqualmie, Wash., they said.

Authorities are encouraging tests and isolation for anyone who visited the lodge since mid-September.

Sign up for