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Fitness tech company JAXJOX raises $10M as it gets ready to ship AI-enabled workout system



The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)


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The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)

JAXJOX, the Redmond, Wash.-based fitness technology company, has raised $10 million in a new funding round to help pay for the research and development of its signature InteractiveStudio workout equipment.

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The Series A round included investors Dowgate Capital Ltd. and entrepreneur Nigel Wray, and brings total funding to $17 million for the 3-year-old company.

JAXJOX is getting set to release its InteractiveStudio smart gym, a home fitness system that includes digitally adjustable weights, AI-enabled connected tech built into the equipment, and live and on-demand classes.

With connected tech built into individual pieces of free-weight equipment, such as a smart kettlebell, users don’t have to stand a certain distance from a screen to have form and motion tracked.

“By monitoring performance metrics and using AI, we can give users a more holistic view of their health and provide recommendations on improving their wellbeing,” founder and CEO Stephen Owusu said in a news release. “We believe that, for users, tracking power generated while lifting will become as important as tracking your heart rate while running.”

The InteractiveStudio is available for pre-order on the JAXJOX website and retails for $2,199 with a $39 monthly subscription. The system will also sell as part of an exclusive retail partnership this fall with Best Buy.

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Feds to ship millions of tests in bid to reopen K-12 schools

The tests will go out to states based on their population and can be used as governors see fit, but the Trump administration is encouraging states to place a priority on schools. White House officials said at a Rose Garden event that 6.5 million tests will go out this week and that a total of 100 million tests will be distributed to governors over the next several weeks.

Officials said the administration is emphasizing testing in schools because it’s important to the physical, social and emotional development of students to be back in classrooms to the degree that’s possible. The Abbott Laboratories tests would allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low.

“You have too many states that are locked down right now,” Trump said. “The governors are … nobody knows what the governors are doing actually.”

The tests will come from a previously announced supply of 150 million ordered from Abbott. The company’s rapid test, the size of a credit card, is the first that does not require specialty computer equipment to process. It delivers results in about 15 minutes.

Rapid, convenient testing is considered essential to reopening the U.S. economy. But the effort has been plagued by problems since the earliest days of the outbreak.

First, the government lost pivotal weeks distributing, then correcting a flawed test developed by U.S. scientists. Then, for months private labs and hospitals struggled to ramp up testing capacity due to shortages of key supplies, including testing chemicals.

The issue is politically sensitive for Trump as he grapples with the pandemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans. For months, Trump has prodded state and local leaders to open schools this fall.

Only in the last two months has U.S. testing capacity generally exceeded demand. The government’s top testing official, Adm. Brett Giroir, told Congress last week that the nation will soon have the capacity to run 3 million tests per day, on average. The U.S. has been averaging about 900,000 tests per day, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

Giroir demonstrated the ease with which the test is given, self-administering the nasal swab then placing it on a piece of paper that contained six drops of liquid.

“This is a very sophisticated little