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4 Women With Parkinson’s Share What They Wish They Knew When They Were First Diagnosed

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Good Housekeeping

While Parkinson’s disease affects men twice more often than women—Michael J. Foxx has been one of the most famous to be afflicted by it—data shows that women experience a faster progression of the disease and a higher mortality rate.

With symptoms like tremors, rigid muscles, slowed movements, and speech changes, a Parkinson’s diagnosis can wreak havoc on the body. These four women, who have been living with Parkinson’s for up to two decades, open up about what they wish they knew when they were first diagnosed, including how important it is to have a rock solid support network.

“You can live a great life with Parkinson’s, but you have to accept help along the way.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

After Kelly Weinschreider, 47, of Chicago, Illinois, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at just 29 years old, she was prescribed several medications that lessened her symptoms. Since she felt fine, it made it easier for her to ignore what was going on, especially since she didn’t tell many people about it. “I didn’t want people to feel sorry for me, or for my diagnosis to change my relationships, personally or professionally, ” she said.

That denial—plus side effects from the medicine and the disease’s progression—forced her to leave her job as a quality manager 10 years later. “I should have been seeing a behavioral health specialist to understand how Parkinson’s affected me and how to accept it,” she says. “Instead, I took my medications sporadically. I mismanaged time and commitments, and I had trouble performing my job and, ultimately, spun out. I wish I would have been more forthcoming with family and friends as to how the disease was affecting me.”

After living with the condition for 18 years, Weinschreider came to terms with her diagnosis. She also realized it truly takes a village to live life with Parkinson’s to its fullest and started to communicate with friends and family when she needed help. “You need the support of family and friends, the care of multiple specialists, and the foresight to plan for the future. You can live a great life with Parkinson’s, but you have to accept help along the way,” Weinschreider says.

“I wish I hadn’t dismissed early symptoms.”

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Denise Coley, 68, of Morgan Hill, California was diagnosed with Parkinson’s two years ago, after months of having trouble balancing and experiencing insomnia and mood changes—all things she thought were unrelated to each other, not signs of a slow degenerative disease. “It wasn’t until the motor symptoms appeared, like the tremors, that I realized what was going on was a bigger issue than I originally thought,” Coley says.

In hindsight, Coley wishes she had responded differently, and run to the doctor first thing. “If I had realized sooner,” she says, “I would have spent more quality time with family. I would have looked into what changes in my life and home were needed earlier in order

Readers Share Their Fitness Transformations: ‘It Has Changed My Life’

A Wall Street Journal article about reporter Anne Marie Chaker’s journey into midlife bodybuilding described a physical transformation that led to an emotional one as well. Readers wrote in to share their own experiences in setting fitness goals that helped them overcome challenges. Below is a selection of reader responses, which have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Bodybuilding changed my life. I discovered it late myself; I was 48 for my first competition. I competed again at 50. Even though I placed second through fourth, it was never about placing for me but about feeling strong and putting in the effort day in and day out. It’s hard physical training and the mental work is even more difficult. Success is staying the course and just doing it.

—Jerri Henry

Meridian, Idaho

At the beginning of March, I discovered strength training and it has changed my life. I feel more confident in my mind/body/skin than I have ever experienced in my 37 years. As a working wife and mom, I always exercised but I never imagined it being something I would be so passionate about.

—Lamees Kelley

Sherborn, Mass.

At 66 I’ve been lifting weights most of my life but I could never build muscle mass. But I still work out hard. While many people think this is a narcissistic adventure, people like us know it is something different altogether. And if nothing else, it means we are in control of our bodies and health.

—Joseph DeRose

Bel Air, Md.

I recently underwent 10 rounds of chemo and started lifting weights to get back in shape after six months of just sleeping, getting poison in my veins and throwing up. I never thought about bodybuilding. But your story planted a seed.

—Orest Mandzy

Doylestown, Pa.

As a professional bodybuilder myself, I can relate to the regimen. We are often forced to find our way in the most turbulent times of our lives. Some of us step up and into making ourselves better people in all aspects. Many decide not to act.

—KJ Lavan

Houston, Texas

I am myself on a new workout routine; I know the sacrifices of counting calories, watching your three macronutrients, taking progress pictures, and challenging yourself every day. Not easy.

I am 53 years old and my goal is to regain the muscle mass that I lost over time by focusing too much on my career. I don’t want to be that guy getting old, seeing his body decline and say, “If only I had done something.” After 12 weeks of intense efforts I see the first subtle benefits of my hard work. It keeps me going.

—Gilles Georges

Mason, Ohio

Reminded me of the importance of right motivation, a settled confidence in one’s path, and the importance of navigating through the “tyranny of others’ expectations.” We all have the seeds of wrong motive within us; pushing past the shiny objects of “cheap and easy” to reach for the worthy goals is a rare accomplishment.

Israeli baby formula maker Else to complete share offering this week

TEL AVIV (Reuters) – Israel’s Else Nutrition BABY.V, which has developed a plant-based infant formula not made from soy, plans to complete a C$25.7 million ($19.3 million) private placement of its shares this week, its chief executive said.

Shareholder H&H International Holding 1112.HK of Hong Kong has bought 11.6% of the shares offered, while Canaccord Genuity CF.TO has taken the rest to sell to investors, Else CEO Hamutal Yitzhak told Reuters.

Else’s formula, made from almonds, buckwheat and tapioca, is organic, vegan and gluten free. Many babies allergic to cow’s milk are also allergic to soy-based formula, Yitzhak said.

“Currently cow’s milk accounts for more than 90% of the market and soy protein for less than 10%,” she said.

Almond is 10 times less allergenic than cow’s milk among babies, according to a 201‮8‬ U.S. allergy prevalence study, said Yitzhak, former head of infant nutrition at Abbott Labs Israel.

Else is seeking a place in the global baby formula market, which is expected to reach nearly $100 billion in 2024 from about $80 billion in 2020, she added.

A month ago Else launched a product online aimed at toddlers in the United States, where it plans this month to start selling its formula through KeHE Distributors, a supplier of chains such as Target and Walmart, and through other distributors.

Else, which is also developing nutrition for adults, will distribute through H&H in China and in Europe, starting in France.

The company need only comply with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations to market its product for toddlers, but must complete a clinical trial to sell formula for infants under 12 months.

“We are working on an FDA pathway, which will take us about two years,” Yitzhak said.

($1 = 1.3300 Canadian dollars)

Reporting by Tova Cohen; Editing by Jan Harvey

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Regenerative Medicine Market Share, Trend, Opportunity, Affect On Demand By COVID-19 Pandemic And Forecast 2020-2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 21, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis
According to Verified Market Research, the Global Regenerative Medicine Market was valued at USD 19.10 Billion in 2018 and is expected to witness a growth of 22.72% from 2019-2026 and reach USD 98.10 Billion by 2026.

What is Regenerative Medicine Market?
The field of regenerative medicine comprises of abundant strategies, which mainly includes use of materials and de novo generated cells, as well as various amalgamations thereof, to substitute the lost tissue, efficiently replacing it both anatomically and functionally, or to contribute to tissue restoration. The main objective of regenerative medicine is to propagate replacement tissue or organs for patients who have sustained an injury or have had a disease that permanently damaged their tissue. National Institutes of Health defines regenerative medicine as a process of creating living, functional tissues to repair or replace tissue or organ function lost due to age, disease, damage, or congenital defects.
Regenerative Medicine can be perceived as an interdisciplinary field of research and clinical applications which mainly focuses on the repair, replacement or regeneration of cells, tissues or organs. Regenerative Medicine mainly restores impaired function resulting from any cause. Regenerative medicine has the ability to rectify or substitute tissues and organs impaired by age, disease, or trauma, as well as to normalize congenital defects.

The Final Report will cover the impact analysis of COVID-19 on this industry:

Download Sample of This Strategic Report: https://www.kennethresearch.com/sample-request-10085009

Regenerative Medicine Market Outlook
Over the last decade, stem cell biology has experienced a breakthrough in scientific and technological developments that will together have foremost and continuing influence on regenerative medicine. These entails capability to produce pluripotent stem cells from adult body cells and to cultivate mini-organs from these or from adult stem cells in well-defined culture conditions. Both methodologies offer ways to develop functional cells of human tissue that could be used for transplantation and tissue repair.
Government policies favoring regenerative medicine is one of the major reasons which has been driving the market growth. The European Union (EU) and Dutch government have prioritized regenerative medicine as an area of key strategic relevance. Apart from this, rapid increase in aged population has also boomed the market in North American region. The North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society is an organization in the U.S. working to improve and advance basic research, commercial development and education in the field of regenerative medicine. In the U.S., two major government agencies – NIH and CIRM – gather funds for academic translational stem cell research and regenerative medicine development. Increasing global healthcare expenditure is also expected to fuel the market.

Lack of awareness and ethical issues regarding the use of Embryonic Stem Cell for R&D is expected to hinder the market for regenerative medicine. The market growth rate is highly influenced by the adoption rate of cell therapy in the market, as it is an integral part of regenerative medicine.

Trump put on steroid recommended for severe Covid-19 cases, even as doctors share upbeat outlook

  • President Trump’s doctors said that they had begun treating him with a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 
  • The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus.
  • White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone.



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building: Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President's medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President's health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.


© Provided by CNBC
Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President’s medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President’s health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.

President Donald Trump’s doctors said Sunday that they had begun treating him with dexamethasone, a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 

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The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus that has killed more than 200,000 Americans.

Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, an infectious diseases physician at the Boston University School of Medicine, said the steroid treatment suggests that Trump has a level of inflammation that warrants the use of steroids despite the fact that the drug also suppresses the immune system. 

“That they made a conscious decision that the benefit of giving steroids outweighs the risk implies a higher degree of severity than what we knew on Friday and Saturday,” Bhadelia said in an email.

Another expert, Dr. Vin Gupta, said the doctors’ disclosures may indicate that Trump could be suffering from pneumonia.

“The treatment the doctors report they administered suggest the president has COVID pneumonia of at least mild severity,” said Gupta, a member of the faculty at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

The briefing took place outside the Walter Reed military hospital in Bethesda, Md., where the president has been treated since Friday. 

White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone. The course of treatment came in response to two incidents in which Trump’s blood oxygen levels dipped below normal levels in recent days. 

Conley also said that Trump could be discharged as soon as Monday and said his health was improving.

Bhadelia said she generally would not discharge someone who was just put on steroids.

The Trump medical team’s announcement complicated assessments of how dire the president’s case is, particularly in light of the caginess that has surrounded details about the president’s health.

Video: Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment (MSNBC)

Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment

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According to the World Health Organization, dexamethasone has been shown to reduce 28-day