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Using the Pandemic as an Opportunity to Lose Weight and Get in Shape

It also helped that she was no longer able to go out for meals and had to cook at home, where she prepared healthy meals for herself, like chicken, fish and salads. Rather than vodka on the rocks, her previous cocktail of choice, she diluted her vodka with mineral water and a splash of cranberry juice. “Quarantine gave me time to be creative with the meals I was eating,” she said.

Another reason many people gained weight is that they stopped planning their meals in advance. Without planning ahead, they would just grab whatever was available.

“Before shelter in place they would prep their meals and sort of had a plan,” said Dr. Rami Bailony, the co-founder and chief executive of Enara Health, a digital membership weight loss clinic. “Once Covid hit they thought they could cook something up that was healthy. But once you’re thinking about eating in the moment you tend to go with what’s expedient.”

When the pandemic started, Mindy Bachrach, 58, a home health occupational therapist in Henderson, Nev., soothed herself with sugary and high fat foods. As an essential worker, she was working pretty much all of her waking hours. “I have a weird job, I eat in my car all the time,” she said. “If I don’t prepare very carefully, I end up getting fast food, which I don’t even like.”

After two weeks, her pants were tighter. As someone who had lost and regained dozens of pounds in her life, she panicked. “I decided I had to do something,” she said. “If I didn’t, things were going to get out of control.”

She went on the Whole 30 plan, which eliminates processed foods, sugar and sugar substitutes, alcohol, grains, dairy and most legumes. She also stopped weighing herself. “I wanted the focus to be on how foods made me feel and not weight loss itself,” she said. Thirty days later, she stepped on the scale and was down 20 pounds.

Randy Garcia, 42, of Dallas, has lost 104 pounds since July, 2019, with the help of Enara, which connects members with a doctor, dietitian and exercise coach and costs $400 a month.

Source Article

How the Agent Behind Some of the Biggest Sports Stars Stays in Shape

From Men’s Health

Casey Wasserman keeps a three-year-old photo on his iPhone. In it, he’s standing next to NBA star Russell Westbrook.

Westbrook boasts the jacked arms and chiseled body. Wasserman? He’s 200 pounds of out-of-shape PR maven. “I saw that picture,” he says, remembering the moment, “and I’m like, ‘I’m done. I need to make a change.’”

The photo is Wasserman’s inspiration, and it’s driving him right now, as he takes off for a 20-yard sprint up his driveway hill on this sunny morning in Beverly Hills. It’s the final run in a 45-minute hill session. Yet Wasserman, 46, is just starting his workout.

Five days a week, he wakes before sunrise, then pushes through workouts with trainer Christine Khuri that may last three hours. “As difficult as it is sometimes to get started, I just know how much better [I’ll feel] and how much more energy and focus I’ll have when I’m done working out,” Wasserman says.

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men’s Health

He needs that focus because he spends the workday pulling double duty, as chairman and CEO of Wasserman—a company that brokers endorsement deals for people like Westbrook and Giancarlo Stanton—and as chair of LA 2028, the committee tasked with prepping the city for the 34th Olympiad. That means overseeing deals that land NFL safety Malcolm Jenkins two clothing lines one moment and studying Olympic venue plans the next. And no, the Olympic prep isn’t all fun, especially when Wasserman gets a brief on rush-hour traffic flow.

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Training clears his head. On this day, he goes from hill to home gym—a1,150-square-foot sweat zone that looks like a mini Equinox—and knocks out five sets of wide-grip pullups. TRX rows, dumbbell rows, and biceps curls follow, leaving him massaging his arms.

Until three years ago, Wasserman wasn’t training like this. He’d played tennis when he was young and had always been active. But he kept an intense travel schedule, frequently flying to Europe, Asia, and South America. “I used to wear this badge of honor that I traveled a lot and worked hard,” he says.

Then, just before the Westbrook wake-up call, his doctor told him he wasn’t in great shape. Wasserman knew he had to make some adjustments. He hasn’t missed a training session since and has dropped to 165 pounds, a weight he’s maintained for 18 months. “I don’t want to find out what happens when you take your foot off the gas,” he says.

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Wasserman constantly finds new ways to drive his body. Some days he pushes the bounds of his breathing and flexibility with yoga. Or he does more hill sprints. Soon after social distancing was ordered in L.A., Wasserman mapped out and ran his own half-marathon course through Beverly Hills. Anything, he says, to prevent reverting to his pre-Westbrook days. “In anything, that anxiety and that fear means you care,” he says. “I care about my health.”

Workout of the Century

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Pancreas size, shape can return to normal in diabetes remission, study says

Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size and shape of the pancreas, the researchers said.

The study included 64 people with type 2 diabetes and a control group 64 people without diabetes whose pancreas health was monitored for two years. At the start of the study, average pancreas volume was 20% smaller and organ borders were more irregular in people with diabetes than in the control group.

After five months of weight loss, pancreas volume was unchanged in people with diabetes who’d gone into remission — responders — as well as those who had not. But after two years, the pancreas had grown by an average of one-fifth in responders, but only about 1/12th in non-responders, the findings showed.

Responders also lost a significant amount of fat from their pancreas, at 1.6%, compared with non-responders, at around 0.5%, and achieved normal pancreas borders, the study found.

Only responders showed early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function, which is key to making and releasing insulin. After five months of weight loss, responders were making more insulin and levels were maintained at two years. There was no change in non-responders.

The findings were presented recently at an online annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“Our previous research demonstrated the return to long-term normal glucose control, but some experts continue to claim that this is merely ‘well-controlled diabetes’ despite our demonstration of a return to normal insulin production by the pancreas,” said study leader Roy Taylor, a professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom.

“However, our new findings of major change in the size and shape of the pancreas are convincing evidence of return to the normal state,” he added.

Taylor noted in an association news release that large amounts of insulin cause tissues to grow or at least maintain their size.

“Normally, inside the pancreas the amounts of insulin present after a meal are very high. But in type 2 diabetes this does not happen. This new study suggests that achieving remission of type 2 diabetes restores this healthy, direct effect of insulin on the pancreas,” Taylor said.

It’s not clear why diabetes remission doesn’t occur in all patients who lose weight, said Elizabeth Robertson, director of research at Diabetes UK, which funded the study.

Type 2 diabetes affects one in 11 — or 415 million — adults worldwide.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more on type 2 diabetes.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Pancrease size, shape can return to normal in diabetes remission, study says

Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size and shape of the pancreas, the researchers said.

The study included 64 people with type 2 diabetes and a control group 64 people without diabetes whose pancreas health was monitored for two years. At the start of the study, average pancreas volume was 20% smaller and organ borders were more irregular in people with diabetes than in the control group.

After five months of weight loss, pancreas volume was unchanged in people with diabetes who’d gone into remission — responders — as well as those who had not. But after two years, the pancreas had grown by an average of one-fifth in responders, but only about 1/12th in non-responders, the findings showed.

Responders also lost a significant amount of fat from their pancreas, at 1.6%, compared with non-responders, at around 0.5%, and achieved normal pancreas borders, the study found.

Only responders showed early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function, which is key to making and releasing insulin. After five months of weight loss, responders were making more insulin and levels were maintained at two years. There was no change in non-responders.

The findings were presented recently at an online annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“Our previous research demonstrated the return to long-term normal glucose control, but some experts continue to claim that this is merely ‘well-controlled diabetes’ despite our demonstration of a return to normal insulin production by the pancreas,” said study leader Roy Taylor, a professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom.

“However, our new findings of major change in the size and shape of the pancreas are convincing evidence of return to the normal state,” he added.

Taylor noted in an association news release that large amounts of insulin cause tissues to grow or at least maintain their size.

“Normally, inside the pancreas the amounts of insulin present after a meal are very high. But in type 2 diabetes this does not happen. This new study suggests that achieving remission of type 2 diabetes restores this healthy, direct effect of insulin on the pancreas,” Taylor said.

It’s not clear why diabetes remission doesn’t occur in all patients who lose weight, said Elizabeth Robertson, director of research at Diabetes UK, which funded the study.

Type 2 diabetes affects one in 11 — or 415 million — adults worldwide.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more on type 2 diabetes.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.