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Trump sets out to get campaign back on track

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump set out to get his campaign back on track Friday, a week after he was sidelined with the coronavirus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

As questions linger about his health, Trump began speaking directly to voters, on the radio, less than four weeks from Election Day, and he eyed a return to travel as soon as Monday. The president has not been seen in public — other than in White House-produced videos — since his return days ago from the military hospital where he received experimental treatments for the virus.

Trump on Friday held what his campaign billed as a “radio rally” as he dialed in to the show of conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh. Despite public and private surveys showing him trailing Democrat Joe Biden, Trump predicted a greater victory in 2020 than four years ago.

While Trump said he believes he’s no longer contagious, concerns about infection appeared to scuttle plans for next week’s presidential debate.


“My voice is now perfect,” he told Limbaugh.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says individuals can discontinue isolation 10 days after the onset of symptoms, which for Trump was Oct. 1, according to his doctors. His doctor, Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley, said that meant Trump, who has been surrounded by minimal staffing as he works out of the White House residence and the Oval Office, could return to holding events on Saturday.

He added that Trump was showing no evidence of his illness progressing or adverse reactions to the aggressive course of therapy prescribed by his doctors.

While reports of reinfection are rare, the CDC recommends that even people who recover from COVID-19 continue to wear masks, stay distanced and follow other precautions. It was unclear if Trump, who refused mask-wearing in most settings, would abide by that guidance.

In the interview with Limbaugh, Trump again credited the experimental antibody drug he received last week with speeding his recovery.

“I was not in the greatest of shape,” he said. “A day later I was fine.” He promised to expedite distribution of the drug to Americans in need, though that requires action by the Food and Drug Administration.

He speculated to Limbaugh that without the drug, “I might not have recovered at all.”

There is no way to know how the drug affected his progression with the virus.

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Wisconsin sets COVID-19 deaths record as hospitals fill up

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Wisconsin set a new record for COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday and the surge in cases in the state threatened to overwhelm some hospitals.

Health officials reported 27 new deaths, breaking the state’s old record of 22 deaths set on May 27. The disease has killed or played a role in the death of 1,327 people in the state since the pandemic began.

Health officials reported 2,319 newly confirmed cases, bringing the total number of cases in Wisconsin to 122,274 since the pandemic began.

Wisconsin had the third-highest positivity rate of any state as of Wednesday. Hospital officials in some areas said they were close to being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients — a scenario that health officials have been warning could happen since the pandemic began but that only now seems like it could happen.

The number of people hospitalized in Wisconsin reached a record-high of 737 on Wednesday, according to state health officials and the Wisconsin Hospital Association. Case spikes in northern and northeastern Wisconsin were causing many of the hospitalizations, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.


Officials at ThedaCare in the Fox Valley said they had exceeded capacity in the COVID-19 unit at their Appleton medical center and had started sending patients to Neenah and hospitals in Berlin, Shawano and Waupaca.

“If it’s growing the way that it has for the past week or so, we’re going to be in a dire situation in two, three, four weeks,” said Michael Hooker, vice president and chief medical officer for acute care at ThedaCare. “Yes, we saw this coming, but didn’t expect it to be quite so rapid.”

Matthew Heywood, president and CEO of Aspirus HealthCare in Wausau, said that hospital has started putting patients on waiting lists, with wait times ranging from several hours to a full day. The system had 61 patients Tuesday who had or were believed to have COVID-19, which was a 30% increase from Monday, when it had 47.

“The problem is, how do we care for you when you have an accident when we have an overflow of COVID patients?” Heywood said. “There’s only so much you can do before you start to overwhelm the system.”

Officials at Bellin Hospital in Green Bay said their facility was at 94% capacity on Tuesday, with 31 patients being treated for COVID-19, up from 26 last Friday. CEO Chris Woleske said the hospital hopes to convert part of its campus into another space for beds and is teaching nonclinical workers, such as athletic trainers, how to deliver supplies and move patients so that nurses can focus on duties only they can perform.

State Health Services Secretary Andrea Palm and Dr. Ryan Westergaard, Wisconsin’s chief medical officer, said Tuesday that they hadn’t received any reports of patients being turned away from hospitals or not getting care. They said if cases don’t subside, patients could be directed to a 530-bed field hospital that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built on the state fairgrounds in West Allis in

Regenerative medicine company Aziyo Biologics sets terms for $50 million IPO

Aziyo Biologics, which makes regenerative medical products for various tissue types, announced terms for its IPO on Wednesday.

The Silver Spring, MD-based company plans to raise $50 million by offering 2.9 million shares at a price range of $16 to $18. Insiders intend to purchase $20 million worth of shares in the offering. At the midpoint of the proposed range, Aziyo Biologics would command a fully diluted market value of $177 million.

Through its proprietary tissue processing platforms, the company has developed a portfolio of advanced regenerative medical products designed to be similar to natural biological material. Its core products are designed to address the implantable electronic device/cardiovascular, orthopedic/spinal repair, and soft tissue reconstruction markets. 

Aziyo Biologics was founded in 2015 and booked $42 million in revenue for the 12 months ended June 30, 2020. It plans to list on the Nasdaq under the symbol AZYO. Piper Sandler, Cowen, Cantor Fitzgerald and Truist Securities are the joint bookrunners on the deal. It is expected to price on Wednesday, October 7, 2020.

The article Regenerative medicine company Aziyo Biologics sets terms for $50 million IPO originally appeared on IPO investment manager Renaissance Capital’s web site renaissancecapital.com.

Investment Disclosure: The information and opinions expressed herein were prepared by Renaissance Capital’s research analysts and do not constitute an offer to buy or sell any security. Renaissance Capital’s Renaissance IPO ETF (symbol: IPO), Renaissance International ETF (symbol: IPOS), or separately managed institutional accounts may have investments in securities of companies mentioned.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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