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Venture-Backed ‘Sentinel Occupational Safety’ Introduces ‘Safety as a Service’ for hazardous and confined space workers

SafeGuard by Sentinel Occupational Safety

With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
  • Aptima Ventures and Accelerant fund spin-off of technology developed for US Air Force

  • Sentinel’s SafeGuard offering provides ‘Safety as a Service’ to monitor and protect workers in dangerous industrial environments

  • Patented fusion engine combines sensors, data, and AI for personalized real-time monitoring and alerting

WOBURN, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — With millions of workers injured and killed annually in hazardous industrial workplace environments, Sentinel Occupational Safety Inc., a new venture-backed startup, is introducing its ‘Safety as a Service’ platform known as SafeGuard™ to improve workplace safety through more preventive oversight.

SafeGuard’s unique IoT approach combines sensors, wearables, and AI analytics to intelligently and continuously monitor workers in a variety of dangerous occupational settings. From frontline firefighters and construction workers who face excessive heat, smoke, and pollution on the job, to those working inside dangerous confined spaces in the presence of noxious fumes, chemicals, and other hazards, workers face far greater risk of injury or death when inadequately monitored, working alone or remotely.

– 100 occupational fatalities each week are deemed preventable. Work-related injury and illness cause 500+ million annual lost workdays.*

How SafeGuard works
SafeGuard fuses a combination of environmental, human, and locational data from a worker’s sensors, analyzing it in the cloud and at the edge to provide real-time detection and alerting. For a mechanic welding inside a ship compartment, for example, algorithms assess their physiological, atmospheric, and other indicators, including heart rate, breathing, air quality, and motion, detecting risks such as dangerous levels of fuel vapors or low oxygen, and their health status.

Unlike current safety protocols that rely on one-to-one observers to check in with confined space workers at intervals, SafeGuard’s cloud-based monitoring enables a single safety manager to oversee the real-time health and safety of 15-20 workers simultaneously, even tracking their precise locations in GPS denied environments.

Predictive alerts and intuitive at-a-glance “green-yellow-red’ status indicators provide continuous, comprehensive monitoring for proactive injury prevention. In the case of high risk or man-down situations, SafeGuard’s built-in decision support capabilities facilitate the appropriate intervention, including emergency or medical response when seconds and minutes are crucial.

Commercializing defense innovation
Funded by Aptima Ventures and the Dayton-based Accelerant Fund, Sentinel was launched to commercialize an innovative ‘confined space monitoring system’ originally developed to improve safety oversight of US Air Force aviation maintenance personnel. The system developed by Aptima, Inc., Lockheed Martin, and the Air Force, and the basis of SafeGuard, will improve real-time incident detection and alerting for safer operations. It is also expected to boost Air Force productivity, allowing nearly 80% of personnel previously used in 1:1 worker monitoring to

The best DNA testing service is just $99 this Amazon Prime Day

Your genes can tell a lot about you. By going beyond your family tree, you can uncover ancestry markers in your DNA that give you insight into your ancestry and your health. 23andMe is ranked as the best DNA testing kit by many reviewers, and it’s now discounted to just $99.00 for health and ancestry, making it a great buy whether you want it for yourself or as an early holiday gift for a loved one. 

It works with a simple saliva test you perform at home and send to 23andMe. This test collects your DNA, and the extracted genetic data reveals your ancestral composition and even the percentage of DNA that you share with Neanderthals, which interbred with early humans.

This offer also includes health insights, providing you with information about how your genetics can influence your chances of developing certain health conditions or if you are a carrier for some inherited conditions.

This DNA kit can identify health-related genetic markers for diseases such as celiac disease, late-onset Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. 

It can also look for genetic markers for diseases like Type 2 diabetes, using your genetics, ethnicity and age to calculate a percentage likelihood of developing the disease. The test also looks at a gene associated with muscle composition to reveal whether your composition is common or not in elite athletes. The test will also indicate whether the subject is a carrier of genetic traits such as cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia and hereditary hearing loss.

There’s even a “cilantro taste aversion” test that will let you know whether you are genetically predisposed to dislike cilantro. Perhaps, you already knew though?

23andMe received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2017 for their kits to report whether customers have hereditary traits that put them at risk for developing genetic diseases, according to the Los Angeles Times. However, the presence of a genetic marker for a health disorder does not necessarily mean that the person will develop that disease, the LA Times reported.

Originally published on Live Science.

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Possible coronavirus outbreak linked to church’s 10-day prayer service

A New Hampshire church’s 10-day indoor prayer service is being linked to a possible COVID-19 outbreak after several people connected to the church tested positive for the coronavirus.

The state’s Department of Health and Human Services said it is investigating the cases at Gate City Church in Nashua, about 40 miles south of Concord.

The church held the multi-day prayer service from Sept. 19 to Sept. 28.

Nashua Public Health Director Bobbie Bagley told local station WMUR that the church required guests to wear face masks when entering and exiting and enforced social distancing but at one point some of the guests removed their masks while inside.

“One of the things that we did learn was during their singing, they took their masks off,” Bagley said. “And we know that when you sing you’re releasing respiratory droplets in the air, so that’s one of the high-risk activities that can occur that can cause exposure in a community.”

The health department said in a press release Wednesday that seven people connected to the church have tested positive for the coronavirus, but Bagley told WMUR that the number of infected is up to nine.

The health department asked that anyone who attended the service get tested for the virus.

The church did not immediately return a request for comment Friday. Pastor Paul Berube released a statement Thursday saying that the church did its best to follow CDC and state guidelines.

“We implemented strict social distancing, physically removing more than half the seats in our facility. We screened our attendees for fever, provided hand sanitizer, required masks when proceeding to or from seats, and posted advisory signs,” the statement read.

“Each and every seat, handrail, and doorknob in our facility was sprayed with disinfectant before and after each meeting. If these infections did occur in our facility, they did so notwithstanding the careful work of our staff, whose efforts likely mitigated even further spread of the infection.”

The church said services will move online for the next few weeks.

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Marines may waive combat fitness tests for service members at risk for coronavirus – U.S.

Marines may waive combat fitness tests for service members at risk for coronavirus


Stars and Stripes is making stories on the coronavirus pandemic available free of charge. See other free reports here. Sign up for our daily coronavirus newsletter here. Please support our journalism with a subscription.


Marine Corps commanders may issue waivers for Marines, or even whole units, for semi-annual combat fitness tests if the testing sites cannot accommodate safety measures to protect against the coronavirus, a spokesman for III Marine Expeditionary Force on Okinawa said Monday.


The Corps is putting mitigating steps in place, such as screening Marines and taking their temperatures before the tests, disinfecting equipment and mandating face masks, said 1st Lt. Pawel Puczko by email to Stars and Stripes. He said Marines who are at a higher risk of contracting the coronavirus or share quarters with someone who is at a higher risk may apply for waivers.


In April, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger ordered a halt to all fitness testing due to the coronavirus. Last month, the Corps announced it will resume its physical fitness and combat fitness tests despite the ongoing pandemic.


Marines will have until the end of December to complete both tests, according to a Sept. 21 memo.


Individual waivers will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, Puczko said.


“The health and safety of our Marines is always a top priority,” he said. “Commands across III MEF have demonstrated their dedication to keeping Marines and families safe from COVID-19 through diligent planning and implementation of safety protocols.”


The allowance for commanders to issue both combat fitness test and physical fitness test waivers will extend across the Marine Corps, according to a Marine administrative order.


COVID-19 is the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus.


Social distancing may prove difficult during the combat fitness test, in which one event requires Marines to drag and carry each other to simulate maneuver under fire, according to the official Marine Corps website.


The Air Force in September postponed its physical fitness assessments until January 2021. Body composition measurements — waist, height and weight — are postponed until further notice, according to last month’s announcement.


All airmen will receive maximum points for the so-called “abdominal circumference” component as part of their official score, including those with exemptions to that waist measurement, the statement said.


“We know people are staying fit regardless, but we want to give our Airmen enough time to prepare,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr. said in the statement.


The Navy also postponed sailors’ physical fitness tests until further notice in an administrative message in July.


“Although the Navy PFA Cycle 2, 2020 has been excused, Sailors are reminded to make good choices for a healthy diet and are to continue a level of fitness to maintain Navy physical fitness standards,” the message said.


Thursday, the Army adopted its long-planned, six-event physical fitness

Marines may waive combat fitness tests for service members at risk for coronavirus – Pacific

Marines may waive combat fitness tests for service members at risk for coronavirus


Stars and Stripes is making stories on the coronavirus pandemic available free of charge. See other free reports here. Sign up for our daily coronavirus newsletter here. Please support our journalism with a subscription.


Marine Corps commanders may issue waivers for Marines, or even whole units, for semi-annual combat fitness tests if the testing sites cannot accommodate safety measures to protect against the coronavirus, a spokesman for III Marine Expeditionary Force on Okinawa said Monday.


The Corps is putting mitigating steps in place, such as screening Marines and taking their temperatures before the tests, disinfecting equipment and mandating face masks, said 1st Lt. Pawel Puczko by email to Stars and Stripes. He said Marines who are at a higher risk of contracting the coronavirus or share quarters with someone who is at a higher risk may apply for waivers.


In April, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger ordered a halt to all fitness testing due to the coronavirus. Last month, the Corps announced it will resume its physical fitness and combat fitness tests despite the ongoing pandemic.


Marines will have until the end of December to complete both tests, according to a Sept. 21 memo.


Individual waivers will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, Puckzo said.


“The health and safety of our Marines is always a top priority,” he said. “Commands across III MEF have demonstrated their dedication to keeping Marines and families safe from COVID-19 through diligent planning and implementation of safety protocols.”


The allowance for commanders to issue both combat fitness test and physical fitness test waivers will extend across the Marine Corps, according to a Marine administrative order.


COVID-19 is the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus.


Social distancing may prove difficult during the combat fitness test, in which one event requires Marines to drag and carry each other to simulate maneuver under fire, according to the official Marine Corps website.


The Air Force in September postponed its physical fitness assessments until January 2021. Body composition measurements — waist, height and weight — are postponed until further notice, according to last month’s announcement.


All airmen will receive maximum points for the so-called “abdominal circumference” component as part of their official score, including those with exemptions to that waist measurement, the statement said.


“We know people are staying fit regardless, but we want to give our Airmen enough time to prepare,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr. said in the statement.


The Navy also postponed sailors’ physical fitness tests until further notice in an administrative message in July.


“Although the Navy PFA Cycle 2, 2020 has been excused, Sailors are reminded to make good choices for a healthy diet and are to continue a level of fitness to maintain Navy physical fitness standards,” the message said.


Thursday, the Army adopted its long-planned, six-event physical fitness

White House staff, Secret Service eye virus with fear, anger

WASHINGTON (AP) — The West Wing is a ghost town. Staff members are scared of exposure. And the White House is now a treatment ward for not one — but two — COVID patients, including a president who has long taken the threat of the virus lightly.

President Donald Trump’s decision to return home from a military hospital despite his continued illness is putting new focus on the people around him who could be further exposed if he doesn’t abide by strict isolation protocols.

Throughout the pandemic, White House custodians, ushers, kitchen staff and members of the U.S. Secret Service have continued to show up for work in what is now a coronavirus hot spot, with more than a dozen known cases this week alone.


Trump, still contagious, has made clear that he has little intention of abiding by best containment practices.

As he arrived back at the White House on Monday evening, the president defiantly removed his face mask and stopped to pose on a balcony within feet of a White House photographer. He was seen inside moments later, surrounded by numerous people as he taped a video message urging Americans not to fear a virus that has killed more than 210,000 in the U.S. and 1 million worldwide.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the White House was “taking every precaution necessary” to protect not just the first family but “every staff member working on the complex” consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and best practices. He added that physical access to the president would be significantly limited and appropriate protective gear worn by those near him.

Nonetheless, the mood within the White House remains somber, with staff fearful they may have been exposed to the virus. As they confront a new reality — a worksite that once seemed like a bubble of safety is anything but — they also have been engaged in finger-pointing over conflicting reports released about the president’s health as well as a lack of information provided internally.

Many have learned about positive tests from media reports and several were exposed, without their knowledge, to people the White House already knew could be contagious.

Indeed, it took until late Sunday night, nearly three full days after Trump’s diagnosis, for the White House to send a staff-wide note in response. Even then, it did not acknowledge the outbreak.

“As a reminder,” read the letter from the White House Management Office, “if you are experiencing any symptoms … please stay home and do not come to work.” Staff who develop symptoms were advised to “go home immediately” and contact their doctors rather than the White House Medical Unit.

Even when Trump was at the hospital, his staff was not immune to risk.

Trump had aides there recording videos and taking photographs of him. On Sunday evening, he took a surprise drive around the hospital to wave to supporters from the window of an SUV. The Secret Service agents in the car with him

Saint Francis Service Dog in training receives rare root canal

ROANOKE, Va. – A Southwest Virginia dentist operated on a very unusual patient on Friday.

Walker the labrador retriever received a root canal in preparation for his work as a Saint Francis Service Dog.

The procedure is rare, but Saint Francis Service Dogs executive director Caball Youell said it was essential to Walker’s future career.

“His tooth was starting to cause him problems,” Youell said. “He needs to be able to pick things up comfortably, carry things for someone, or retrieve items.”

Walker got his canine tooth repaired at the Roanoke Animal Hospital, but none of the veterinarians there had the capacity to treat a root canal.

“We needed some special equipment and materials to do the root canal, and the dental community stepped up,” said Dr. Mark Finkler of Roanoke Animal Hospital.

Instead, Dr. Grant Throckmorton of Wythe Family Dentistry drove an hour from Wytheville to operate on Walker in Roanoke.

“The tooth is about twice as long as you’ll ever see a human tooth,” Throckmorton said. “They’re just massive. Some of my instruments don’t even work on dog teeth.”

The procedure went well, and Throckmorton finished the job in about an hour.

Youell said she is in the process of finding Walker’s permanent home, and she’s relieved his tooth will no longer cause him trouble.

“He’s going to want to go pick things up and bring them to you,” Youell said. “Whenever you see Walker, he looks around and says, ‘what present can I bring you?’”

Copyright 2020 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

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Melania Trump didn’t visit husband to avoid exposing Secret Service and medical staff to COVID-19

Doctors and infectious disease experts were highly critical of President Trump’s decision to get driven in a hermetically sealed SUV around Walter Reed Medical Center to wave to supporters while he is contagious with COVID-19, endangering his Secret Service detail, photographed wearing the wrong type of personal protective equipment. The Secret Service has noticed.

Somebody at the White House had considered the safety of Secret Service agents. On Saturday, a White House official told NBC News’ Peter Alexander that first lady Melania Trump would not leave her isolation in the White House residence to visit her husband because “she has COVID” and “that would expose the agents who would drive her there and the medical staff who would walk her up to him.”

The White House defended what spokesman Judd Deere called Trump’s “short, last-minute motorcade ride to wave to his supporters outside.” Deere told Axios‘ Alayna Treene, the White House pool reporter on duty, that “appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the president and all those supporting it, including PPE. The movement was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.” Deere did not, Treene note, “answer additional questions, such as whether the drive-by happened at the president’s request.”

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Doctor slams Trump for leaving hospital to drive by supporters: ‘The irresponsibility is astounding’

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Trump’s drive outside Walter Reed hospital criticized by Secret Service members, doctors

A growing number of Secret Service agents have been concerned about the president’s seeming indifference to the health risks they face when traveling with him in public, and a few reacted with outrage to the trip, asking how Trump’s desire to be seen outside of his hospital suite justified the jeopardy to agents protecting the president. The president’s coronavirus diagnosis has already brought new scrutiny to his lax approach to social distancing, as public health officials scramble to trace those he may have exposed at large in-person events.

“He’s not even pretending to care now,” said one agent after the president’s jaunt outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

“Where are the adults?” said a former Secret Service member.

They spoke on the condition of anonymity out of fear of retribution.

White House spokesman Judd Deere defended the outing, telling reporters that “appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the President and all those supporting it.” Deere said precautions included personal protective equipment, without providing further details, and added that the trip “was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.”

The White House did not immediately respond to questions from The Washington Post on Sunday night.

Trump wore a mask as he waved to a crowd from the back of his vehicle, after announcing that he would “pay a little surprise to some of the great patriots that we have out on the street.” But the face covering was little comfort to doctors, who took to Twitter to criticize the trip as irresponsible. Masks “help, but they are not an impenetrable force field,” tweeted Saad B. Omer, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health.

Among critics was a doctor affiliated with Walter Reed.

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary Presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days,” tweeted James P. Phillips, who is also a professor at George Washington University. “They might get sick. They may die. For political theater. Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity.”

Phillips said the risk of viral transmission inside the car is “as high as it gets outside of medical procedures.” Jonathan Reiner, a professor of medicine and surgery at George Washington University, noted that people inside a hospital wear extensive protective gear — gowns, gloves, N95 masks and more — when they will be in close contact with a coronavirus patient such as Trump.

“By taking a joy ride outside Walter Reed the president is placing his Secret Service detail at grave risk,” he tweeted.

Trump had been irked that White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows suggested he was not doing well as he fought the virus, according to campaign and White House officials.

“The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning, and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care,” Meadows said Saturday afternoon, in sharp contrast to doctors who offered rosy

Pairing service dogs with disabled veterans is goal of fitness challenge event this month | Local News

Hi! My name is Zero Suit Samus (or Samus for short), and I’m an energetic pitbull mix who needs some love. And I really mean that. I need a family who will cuddle with me because your penalty for not giving me cuddles is to hear the cry of my people. My foster dad says that based on my crying, I must have descended from pterodactyls, but that’s silly because pterodactyls don’t even like peanut butter. And I looove peanut butter. And treats. And strawberries. And watermelon. And anything, really. Honestly kid, if you give me your salad, I’ll eat it. Don’t want your broccoli? I’ll take care of your problem. See that toy? It’s in my stomach now. See that puke? Well, you can have your toy back.

Like all superdogs, I have an origin story: I ran across the highway and caused a 4-car pileup that I ended up underneath. It wasn’t my best choice, but it’s still a better love story than “Twilight.” I have to take daily medication now, or else I have pretty severe seizures. But I like to think of my epilepsy as my unbridled superpower that the world just isn’t ready for yet.

I’m a Tulsa native, but I’m still not a fan of the Bermuda grass around here – I get allergies in the summer, so that’s something you should know. Despite this, I still love running and rolling in the grass, and if you toss me a ball, I can jump and catch it in mid-air even when it’s 6-feet high. I’m not exaggerating. (Pterodactyl dogs never exaggerate.) And would you mind spraying me with a hose once in a while? I love playing in water, especially when it’s coming out of a tiny hose at jet-like speeds.

But if you have another dog in the home, then forget about it because I’m a single-dog dog. A lone wolf. A rebel. I will not share my toys, I will not share my food, and I will not share my family. I do just fine around other dogs in general, but once you introduce toys or food, then I get very territorial. Can we agree that I’ll be your only one?

By the way, I love kids. I don’t have these problems with other humans, so don’t worry about bringing me home to your young ones. I am loyal to the bone. Don’t believe me? Try going for a jog with me. I will keep pace with you the entire time, just running by your hip. Need me to lick the sweat off your face after an especially hot run? Baby, that’s what I’m about. I’m a good dog. My foster family says so, too. I will take care of you if you let me. I’m eager to learn, I don’t catch coronaviruses, and I’m housebroken. I won’t poop in your Cheerios. Unless that’s one of your commands, but why would it be? Don’t want your Cheerios? Just let me have them