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PTCE Announces September ‘Faces of Pharmacy’ Winners in Recognition of American Pharmacists Month

Yearlong campaign recognizes pharmacists for their dedication, and often overlooked contributions, to transforming healthcare

In support of American Pharmacists Month in October, PTCE, a leader in continuing education for multispecialty pharmacists and pharmacy professionals, is committed to recognizing pharmacists’ contributions to health care practices and all they do for their communities through its ‘Faces of Pharmacy’ recognition program.

In this transforming health care landscape, The Faces of Pharmacy nomination opportunity celebrates pharmacists, who navigate evolving health care practices and continue to make a difference in the lives of their patients.

Continuing its year-long campaign, PTCE is proud to announce its September winners:

  • Alisa Eibling, Pharm.D., Clinical Director, PFSP Specialty Pharmacy

  • Adam King, MPH, CPhT, PR, Executive Director and founder, CompassionRx

  • Jameika Stuckey, Pharm.D., Clinical Supervisor and medication safety manager, University of Mississippi Medical Center

  • Michael Lorenzo Tinglin, Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacist, Premier Family Medical

“Congratulations to the four pharmacy professionals who were selected as the winners of our Faces of Pharmacy program,” said Jim Palatine, R.Ph., MBA, president of PTCE. “The number of nominations we have received for the month of September truly exemplifies the need and desire to acknowledge these healthcare professionals who make a difference in the lives of their patients. In honor of American Pharmacists Month, we are devoted to showing our appreciation for the care and commitment of pharmacy professionals in the industry, and we will continue to recognize these professionals every month with our inaugural yearlong campaign.”

Each month, PTCE will select four pharmacy professionals to feature on its website and social media platforms in recognition of their unwavering commitment to delivering exceptional care to patients.

Nominations can be submitted online by colleagues, patients, friends and family members of outstanding pharmacists, pharmacy technicians or anyone else working in the industry. Submissions should detail what the nominee has done to ensure access to treatment and care or describe how they go above and beyond to support their patients or community.

For more information about the September Faces of Pharmacy winners, click here.

About Pharmacy Times Continuing Education™

Pharmacy Times Continuing Education™ (PTCE) is a leader in continuing education for retail, health system, oncology, managed care and specialty pharmacists. PTCE is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education (CPE). PTCE’s print, online and live CPE activities are designed to help improve the knowledge, competence and skills of pharmacists so they are better prepared to provide the highest quality pharmacy care to the patients they serve and to the physicians they assist as part of a multidisciplinary treatment/management team. To learn more about the educational activities sponsored by PTCE, visit https://www.pharmacytimes.org.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005978/en/

Contacts

PTCE
Alexandra Ventura, 609-716-7777
[email protected]

Source Article

Where Things Stand In September

ORLAND PARK, IL — September is officially behind us, but COVID-19, not so much. The pandemic has been upon us for over six months and cases continue to fluctuate in various area’s around the world.

John Hopkins University and Medicine reports there have been a total of 34,020,904 COVID-19 cases around the world— as of Oct. 1. Over seven-million of those cases are here in the United States. When it comes to counties in the U.S., the university reported Cook County has the third largest amount of COVID-19 cases, at 145,462, as of Sept. 30.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reported that there are 1,632 people across Illinois in the hospital for COVID-19 or are under investigation. About 7% of hospital beds are being occupied by these patients and 378 these patients are in the ICU, as of Sept. 30.

Here is a look and what COVID-19 was like during the month of September for the Village of Orland Park, according to the Cook County Department of Public Health.

Orland Park

  • Since the start of the pandemic there have been a total of 1,274 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Orland Park. In August, there was a total of 926 cases reported in Orland Park, since the start of the pandemic.

  • In the past week, the village recorded 68 positive cases of COVID-19.

  • The weekly case rate is 120 cases per 100,000 people.

  • The percent change in confirmed cases in the past two weeks is +24.2%.

For additional information on the number of cases reported in Orland Park, visit the Cook County Department of Public Heath website.

This article originally appeared on the Orland Park Patch

Source Article

Trump promised 300 million N95 masks by September. He isn’t even close.




a close up of a sign


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WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is falling far short of its goal of having 300 million N95 respirators available in time for the flu season, according to internal documents reviewed by Yahoo News. Though the supply of N95 respirators has greatly increased in the last several months, it is at a little less than one-third of promised levels.

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N95 respirators protect wearers against the coronavirus better than cloth or surgical face masks; the name refers to their ability to filter out 95 percent, or all but the smallest, of particles. The masks are critical to people in medical settings and frontline occupations.

According to a briefing document circulated on Monday to senior officials in the Department of Health and Human Services, the government now has 87.6 million N95 masks available, far short of the 300 million promised several months ago. 

The administration has also stockpiled 49 million KN95 masks, which are certified by China, and are potentially less reliable. A recent study of KN95s imported to the U.S. found that 70 percent of the masks didn’t meet the required filtration standards.

N95 masks, on the other hand, are approved by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.



table: Source: FEMA


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Source: FEMA

In April, amid shortages of N95s, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency authorization for the Chinese-certified version while the U.S. ramped up domestic production.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services defended the Trump administration’s efforts to stockpile sufficient quantities of face masks, saying it has moved “with deliberate and determined speed to ensure supplies and equipment are available for frontline U.S. healthcare workers.”

In recognition of fierce competition between individual states for personal protective equipment, as well as between states and the federal government, the spokesperson said the department was “taking care not to disrupt the commercial supply chain.”



KN95 respirator masks for sale in Elgin, Ill. (Mark Black/ZUMA Wire)


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KN95 respirator masks for sale in Elgin, Ill. (Mark Black/ZUMA Wire)

A shortage of respirators — on both federal and state levels — could prose problems in the months ahead, as the coronavirus pandemic and influenza season could potentially lead to a rush on hospitals through the fall and winter. States have been preparing for precisely that scenario, which could be exacerbated by reopening plans that are continuing to move forward.

The federal government stepped in late in the spring, promising that both the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Strategic National Stockpile would have adequate protective equipment. The days of doctors sitting through seminars on how to sew masks or posting YouTube videos on how to reuse respirators, which are intended for single use, would be relegated to memory.

There were 13 million N95 masks in federal coffers in the winter of 2020, when the pandemic first arrived in the United States. 

On a press call with reporters on May 14, an administration official sounded confident. “We have an aspiration to eventually have a billion of those,” he