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Khloe Kardashian’s fitness schedule kept her ‘sane’

Khloe Kardashian’s fitness schedule kept her “sane” during lockdown.



Khloe Kardashian standing in front of a brick wall


© Bang Showbiz
Khloe Kardashian

The ‘Keeping Up With The Kardashians’ star admits there have been some “crazy times” in the world because of the coronavirus pandemic but she has turned to exercise to keep her going and keep her mental state positive too.

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Explaining about her fitness regime, she said: “I definitely think because of my fitness journey and already having such a regimented schedule when it comes to working out, it kind of kept me sane during these crazy times. I had to learn to adapt by doing mommy-daughter workouts. [True] is obviously not working out, but it’s things like me putting her in a wagon and sprinting up a hill. I belted a wagon to my waist because I don’t have any help. We’re all just trying to figure it out.”

And the 36-year-old reality television star wants to set a good example for her daughter True when it comes to her exercise regime and she hopes her daughter will be “active and take care of herself” like her mom.

Speaking to Refinery29, she added of her lifestyle: “I want to show my daughter, by example, that there are healthy ways to be active every day.

“You don’t have to be so rigid in the gym. I like to work out early, it just sets the tone for the rest of my day, it makes me want to eat better and be active and healthy. By her seeing me like this, I hope she’s active and takes care of herself.”

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Trump has met CDC criteria to end isolation and is cleared to return to an active schedule by his physician

President Donald Trump has been cleared to return to an active schedule, according to a new memo from his physician, Dr. Sean Conley, released Saturday night.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his face mask to speak from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
President Donald Trump removes his face mask to speak from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The memo says Trump has met criteria from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to end isolation but does not say Trump has received a negative coronavirus test since first testing positive for the virus last week. However, that is not a criteria for clearing isolation, according to the CDC.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” the memo from Conley reads in part.

Conley wrote that Trump is 10 days from the onset of symptoms, has been fever-free for “well over 24 hours” and after diagnostic tests, “there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus.”

Conley did not fully explain what “advanced diagnostic tests” the President had received. For example, he did not disclose whether so-called viral culture was performed — the process by which scientists try to infect living cells to see whether active virus is present.

The latest disclosure from Conley comes as Trump prepares to return to the campaign trail after being sidelined amid his fight with the virus. It’s likely to raise additional questions about the health of the President as officials continue to provide carefully worded statements as the campaign enters its final stretch.

Trump on Saturday held his first public event since his diagnosis, delivering a highly political speech to a crowd of supporters packed on the White House’s South Lawn. He is currently scheduled to hold at least three in-person rallies this upcoming week, beginning Monday in Florida. Conley says he will continue to monitor Trump “as he returns to an active schedule.”

Officials — including Conley — still haven’t disclosed when the President last tested negative before his positive test last week, which would offer insight into when he was contagious and how much so.

Trump, who left the hospital earlier this week after receiving treatment for the virus, credited his quick recovery to his rapid treatment during an interview with Fox News on Friday.

“I think the secret for me was I got there very early,” he told the network’s medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel.

Trump had received an immediate dose of an experimental monoclonal antibody therapy at the White House, then was treated with a course of the infused antiviral medication remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone during his hospital stay. He had also been given supplemental oxygen, Conley previously said.

This story has been updated with additional background information and context.

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Health Groups Turn Up Heat on 2021 Medicare Fee Schedule

WASHINGTON — Physician groups and other healthcare providers continued expressing their dissatisfaction with the 2021 Medicare physician fee schedule proposed rule from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

“While we support the CPT coding revisions and revaluations of office and outpatient evaluation and management (E/M) services recommended by the AMA/Specialty Society RVS Update Committee [RUC], we strongly oppose the proposed budget neutrality reduction proffered by CMS for these and other physician fee schedule changes proposed for 2021,” said a letter sent Monday to CMS Administrator Seema Verma from 47 medical and health specialty groups including the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Radiology, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The groups represent 1.4 million providers, including physicians, social workers, and speech-language pathologists.

If adopted as proposed, the fee schedule would “reduce Medicare payment for services provided in patients’ homes, physician offices, non-physician practices, therapy clinics, skilled nursing facilities, hospitals and rehabilitation agencies — at a time when the spread of COVID‐19 remains unchecked,” the letter said.

The proposed fee schedule, which was announced in early August, includes “simplified coding and billing requirements for E/M visits [that] will go into effect January 1, 2021, saving clinicians 2.3 million hours per year in burden reduction,” CMS said. “As a result of this change, clinicians will be able to make better use of their time and restore the doctor-patient relationship by spending less time on documenting visits and more time on treating their patients.”

However, the proposed rule also lists (on p. 50375) the estimated impacts of the rule’s payment changes for each specialty, which includes losers as well as winners.

Three specialties fare the best: endocrinology, with a 17% increase; rheumatology, with a 16% increase; and hematology/oncology, with a 14% increase. At the bottom are nurse anesthetists and radiologists, both with an 11% decrease; chiropractors, with a 10% decrease; and interventional radiology, pathology, physical and occupational therapy, and cardiac surgery, all with a 9% decrease. Surgical specialties in general took some of the biggest hits, with cuts in every category ranging from 5% to 9%.

The proposed rule also lists the fee schedule’s final conversion factor — the amount that Medicare’s relative value units (RVUs) are multiplied by to arrive at a reimbursement for a particular service or procedure under Medicare’s fee-for-service system. Due to budget neutrality changes required by law, the proposed 2021 conversion factor is $32.26, a decrease of $3.83 from the 2020 conversion factor of $36.09, CMS said. Comments on the proposed rule were due by 5 p.m. on Monday.

American Medical Group Association (AMGA), which represents group practices, also weighed in on the proposed rule. “AMGA is concerned that the CMS proposed 2021 Physician Fee Schedule rule would inadvertently exacerbate the financial situation facing our membership that is a result of the ongoing novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic,” the association said in a statement. “While appreciative of the effort to increase support for primary care services, the Physician Fee Schedule’s budget neutrality requirements effectively