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Advocates Stand Up Against AstraZeneca to Save Drug Discount Program for Vulnerable Populations

Wilmington Protest, Wed., Oct. 14th – 12 noon – 1:00 pm ET

Dozens of concerned healthcare advocates from across the northeast region protest AstraZeneca, one of five U.S. based pharmaceutical companies that have cut back on the number of drugs they provide through the 340B federal drug discount program

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The updated release reads:

DELAWARE PROTEST: ADVOCATES STAND UP AGAINST ASTRAZENECA TO SAVE DRUG DISCOUNT PROGRAM FOR VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

Wilmington Protest, Wed., Oct. 14th – 12 noon – 1:00 pm ET

Dozens of concerned healthcare advocates from across the northeast region protest AstraZeneca, one of five U.S. based pharmaceutical companies that have cut back on the number of drugs they provide through the 340B federal drug discount program.

Healthcare advocates from across the northeast region will protest the recent actions of AstraZeneca, in cutting back the number of critical life-saving drugs provided at discounted rates to non-profit healthcare providers, through the federal 340B drug discount program.

WHAT:

Protest against AstraZeneca

 

 

WHERE:

AstraZeneca’s Corporate Office

 

1800 Concord Pike, Wilmington, DE 19803

 

NOTE: The protest will take place at the intersection of Powder Mill Road & Route 22

 

 

WHEN:

Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 14, 2020

 

12noon – 1pm (EDT)

 

 

WHO:

Healthcare advocates from across the Northeast Region

The federal 340B Drug Discount Program is a lifeline that allows safety net providers, including HIV/AIDS clinics receiving funding through the Ryan White program, to obtain prescription drugs at below-retail prices. The program was established with bipartisan support as part of the Veterans Health Care Act of 1992. With 340B savings, Ryan White clinics are able to stretch their grant funds, offer a wider range of services, and improve the quality of care persons living with HIV/AIDS receive. The program also benefits qualified 340B covered entities such as non-profit rural health facilities, community clinics and children’s hospitals that serve vulnerable populations.

Tomorrow’s protest, led by healthcare advocates from AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), follows a lawsuit filed by Ryan White Clinics for 340B Access (RWC-340B) against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, to require the HHS secretary to take action against AstraZeneca and three other pharmaceutical companies, including Eli Lilly, Novartis and the U.S. division of Sanofi-Aventis which are illegally withholding drugs they are required to sell through the 340B program. With tomorrow’s protest, AHF is demanding that these greedy pharmaceutical companies stop their bullying tactics that will have a devastating impact on the healthcare and well-being of our most vulnerable populations (see LITIGATION PRESS RELEASE). RWC340B also recently released a study on the potential adverse impact of policies reducing resources to Ryan White clinics, see WHITE PAPER, PRESS RELEASE, and FACT SHEET.

“AstraZeneca has launched an assault on a federal drug discount program essential to the safety net of our nation’s health care,” stated John Hassell, AHF’s national director of advocacy. “They are messing with the numerous health care centers

Save up to 44% on Fitbit smartwatches (UK deal)

SAVE UP TO 44%: Fitbit smartwatches and fitness trackers are on sale for Prime Day, saving you up to 44% on list price.


Prime Day has officially kicked off, and more deals are dropping every hour. There are a lot of deals, discounts, and promotions to consider, and it could be seriously overwhelming if you don’t have some help.

Luckily we are lining up a selection of the best deals throughout the sale, and we’ve got some good news for anyone looking to save on smartwatches and fitness trackers: you can now save up to 44% on Fitbit.

You can save on popular models like the Fitbit Versa 2, Inspire, and Inspire HR until midnight on Oct. 14:

Fitbit Inspire — £38.99 (save 44%)

The Fitbit Inspire is a fitness tracker for every day that helps you build healthy habits. This stylish device encourages you to reach your weight and fitness goals, with sleep tracking, fitness guidance, and a five-day battery life.

The best deals on Fitbit smartwatches and fitness trackers this Prime Day

Fitbit Versa 2 — £129.99 (save 35%)

The Fitbit Versa 2 is a water resistant smartwatch that lets you create alarms, set bedtime reminders, or check the weather with built-in voice control. You can see your stats with an always-on display mode, plus get daily sleep-quality scores, apps, and notifications, with storage for over 300 songs.

The best deals on Fitbit smartwatches and fitness trackers this Prime Day

Fitbit Inspire HR — £59.99 (save 33%)

The Fitbit Inspire HR is a heart rate and fitness tracker for every day. It provides around-the-clock heart rate monitoring, workout features, calorie burn tracking, goal celebrations, sleep stages, and more.

The best deals on Fitbit smartwatches and fitness trackers this Prime Day

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Prime Day Golf, Fitness & Sports Deals 2020: Early Treadmill, Exercise Bike, Nike & Adidas Apparel, Golf & Gym Equipment Sales Identified by Save Bubble

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Amazon Prime Day 2020 researchers at Save Bubble have shared the latest early sports and fitness deals for Amazon Prime Day 2020, featuring deals on golf apparel and equipment, stationary bikes, treadmills, ellipticals, running shoes, sportswear and more. Check out the full range of deals in the list below.

Best golf deals:

Best sport & fitness products deals:

Best exercise bike & treadmill deals:

Best Nike & Adidas sports gear:

Want some more Adidas, Nike, and more fitness gear deals? Click here to shop the entire selection of deals on the Amazon Prime Day page.

Amazon Prime Day 2020 discounts last for a certain length of time. Save Bubble earns commissions from purchases made using the links provided.

Prime Day gives shoppers an exciting opportunity to take advantage of a huge number of deals across Amazon’s broad range of products.

Not yet an Amazon Prime member? Start your 30-day free trial now and unlock all the best Prime Day deals.

Prime Day gives shoppers an excellent opportunity to save on golf and sports equipment, fitness and exercise machines, and gym clothing and footwear. As a hobby, golf requires numerous specialty equipment such as golf club drivers and iron sets. Complete golf club sets from Strata, Pinemeadow, and PreciseGolf are available in sizes for men, women, and children. Golf balls from Titleist, Callaway, and TaylorMade, as well as various training equipment such as putting greens and golf chipping nets can allow enthusiasts to practice their swings and putts at home.

Fitness equipment such as exercise bikes and treadmills are also highly popular on Amazon. Schwinn exercise bikes and Marcy recumbent bikes are some of the top-selling exercise equipment, along with under-desk pedal exercisers from DeskCycle, which allow indoor cycling even while you’re working. NordicTrack and Sunny Health & Fitness treadmills are highly rated and come in folding variants for easier storage.

Sports footwear and fitness clothing are necessary for enhanced freedom of movement while working out. adidas, Nike, Under Armour, Reebok, and similar active wear brands all have extensive lines of running shoes, activewear apparel, and more.

This year’s Prime Day sale taking place later in the year marks a first in Prime Day history.

Want some more sports and fitness deals? Click here to browse the full selection of deals on the Amazon Prime Day sale page.

About Save Bubble: Save Bubble round-up the latest online sales news. As an Amazon Associate Save Bubble earns from qualifying purchases.

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Tennessee doctors removed a man’s heart to save his life

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – In an extraordinary operation, a Mississippi man’s heart was removed and replaced with what Baptist Memorial Hospital doctors call a “total artificial heart” — battery-charged electromechanical devices that will keep the 41-year-old man’s blood pumping until a heart transplant can be arranged.



a person wearing a hat: Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo's heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.


© Ariel Cobbert/The Commercial Appeal
Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo’s heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.

Wearing a surgical-style mask decorated with an American flag and the motto “United We Stand,” artificial heart recipient Brian Pedigosaid Wednesday that his life since his first heart attack —which came “11 days before my 33rd birthday” — had been a constant struggle with heart disease, including a “massive” 2017 heart attack and the almost complete bodily shutdown that led to his Sept. 3 surgery at Baptist.

“I was close to giving up,” said Pedigo, who lives in Booneville, about 115 miles southeast off Memphis, with his wife, Amy Pedigo, their two dogs, Remington and Angel, and a pot-bellied pig named Sassy Mae, nicknamed Sassy Pants. (“She talks back to Brian, that’s why I call her Sassy Pants,” Amy explained.)

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Fortunately, the artificial heart — essentially, a pair of pumps that replace the removed ventricles of the heart  — has given Pedigo a new lease on life, literally.

“I feel great,” said Pedigo, sitting on the edge of a hospital bed. Unsurprisingly, he looked thin and sounded hoarse. “For the last eight years, I’ve fought, gone down and come back,” he said.



a man wearing glasses posing for the camera: Dr. Dmitry Yaranov, Pedigo's primary cardiologist at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020.


© Ariel Cobbert/ The Commercial Appeal
Dr. Dmitry Yaranov, Pedigo’s primary cardiologist at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020.

Dr. Dmitry Yaranov, Pedigo’s primary cardiologist at Baptist, said only about 15 operations of the type that saved Pedigo have been performed in history.

“This is the most complex, the rarest and the highest-risk operation a heart patient can go through,” he said. 

Also, “the most technically challenging,” said Dr. Rachel Harrison, the surgeon who performed the operation with Dr. Martin Strueber, Baptist chief of cardiac surgery and thoracic transplantation.

“It’s a very unconventional approach,” said Michelle Lorenz, administrative director of transplant services at Baptist. “But we had to do it to save his life.”

Pedigo had been receiving treatment in Corinth, Mississippi, before doctors there sent him to Vanderbilt University Medical Center. From there, he came to Memphis, where his failing health called for extreme measures. 



a person sitting on a table: Dr. Rachel Harrison, the surgeon who performed the operation with Dr. Martin Strueber, goes over a diagram of heart patient Brian Pedigo's surgery at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo's heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.


© Ariel Cobbert/ The Commercial Appeal
Dr. Rachel Harrison, the surgeon who performed the operation with Dr. Martin Strueber, goes over a diagram of heart patient Brian Pedigo’s surgery at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo’s heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.

“His lungs were no longer oxygenating his blood,” Harrison said. “His liver was

A Texas family lost four members to Covid-19. Now they want to save others from heartbreak.

The coronavirus had already killed Nieves Salas Solis’ mother and brother when he called his daughter from a hospital bed with a chilling message: “I’m next.”

Nieves, 62, who grew up in Dallas and in recent years lived in a Mexican border town doing community outreach, had a high fever and shortness of breath. It was mid-August, and he had managed to drive himself to a hospital in Harlingen, Texas, where doctors confirmed that he had Covid-19. But their efforts to clear his lungs were not working, said his daughter, Ana Alonso.

Ana knew her father was grieving his mother, Eva Solis-Salas, 89, who died Aug. 6, and a brother, Ruperto Salas Solis, 67, who died Aug. 10, after their own brief battles with the coronavirus.

IMAGE: Ana Alonso and Eva Solis-Salas (Ana Alonso)
IMAGE: Ana Alonso and Eva Solis-Salas (Ana Alonso)

But the thought of losing him, too, was unimaginable. Nieves was a “health freak” who ran up to 5 miles a day and had no underlying medical conditions, Ana said. Decades earlier, he had nearly become a professional boxer, turning down the opportunity only because Eva — a single mother to Nieves and nine other children — was afraid he would get hurt.

From her home in Mesquite, Texas, Ana begged her father to stay upbeat.

“You still have to fight,” she said she told him over FaceTime. “I said, ‘What do you have to say?’ And my dad put his hand up, and he flipped off the camera, and he said, ‘This is what I have to say to Covid.’ He kept saying, ‘F— Covid!'”

Nieves was always joking around, Ana said, and seeing his sense of humor from the hospital gave her hope. But his condition worsened, and on Aug. 22, he succumbed to the illness.

The Salas Solis family had now lost their matriarch and two of her sons. But their heartbreak was not over: On Sept. 15, another son, Raul Salas Solis, 64, also died of Covid-19 after having been hospitalized for more than a month.

The four deaths in less than six weeks, reported Tuesday by the Dallas Observer, shattered the close-knit family, which includes Eva’s approximately 32 grandchildren, 59 great-grandchildren and 13 great-great-grandchildren. One of Eva’s grandchildren, Jahaziel Salas, also experienced another loss from the disease: His father-in-law, Alfredo Nava, died of Covid-19 earlier in the summer.

“It’s been very, very tragic for our family, and I honestly still think that we haven’t fully processed everything,” said Ana, 40, who co-teaches seventh grade. “Somehow, it needs to be turned into awareness.”

That is what their late relatives would have wanted, Ana said. Helping others was in their blood: About five years ago, her father moved from Texas back to his birthplace, Valle Hermoso, Tamaulipas, Mexico, retiring from work as a warehouse manager to dedicate himself to helping families in need of medical care and education.

Nieves lived next door to his mother in Valle Hermoso, while another son, Ruperto, lived with their mother. A third son, Raul, ran

Injection of drug that promotes blood clotting could save accident victims

  • Tranexamic acid is a drug currently used to stop bleeding in trauma patients
  • At present it is administered via an intravenous line — which is fiddly to set up
  • British and French experts have shown it can be given like a ‘flu jab into muscle
  • The team are working on an EpiPen-like device for accident sites and warzones

The lives of thousands of accident victims could be saved by injecting a common drug that helps stop bleeding at the scene of the incident, a study has found.

Experts from the UK and France found that an injection of tranexamic acid reduces traumatic injury death rates by up to a third — if administered within an hour.  

The team proved that the drug can be successfully administer as an intramuscular injection — like a ‘flu jab — rather than the traditional intravenous line.

The finding may be of most benefit in low- and middle- income nations, the team said, where first responders are less likely to be trained to set up intravenous lines.

In fact, these countries see more that 90 per cent of the world’s trauma deaths — around 80 per cent of which occur before the patient even arrives at hospital.

The lives of thousands of accident victims could be saved by injecting a common drug that helps stop bleeding at the scene of the incident, a study has found (stock image)

‘Intramuscular tranexamic acid is like a vaccine against trauma death,’ paper author and epidemiologist Ian Roberts of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine told the Times.

‘An urgent injection of tranexamic acid is life-saving after serious injury. but patients are not being treated fast enough,’ he added.

‘A rapid intramuscular injection given by first responders or paramedics could mean the difference between life and death.’

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Tranexamic acid is already used to stabilise trauma patients — but it is traditionally administered by an intravenous line — which takes longer to set up and work.

‘At the moment in the NHS tranexamic acid is used but patients aren’t getting it quick enough. It’s most effective when given within an hour of injury, and the hours just disappear so quickly,’ Professor Roberts told the Times.

‘It takes time for the ambulance to arrive, time for paramedics to orientate themselves to what’s going on. It takes a little time to put in an intravenous line — sometimes they just say, well, let’s leave that for the hospital.’

‘This way, you can just inject it intramuscularly and forget about it.’

Every quarter-hour delay a patient experiences in getting tranexamic acid reduces the drug’s lifesaving potential by around 10 per cent, Professor Roberts explained — adding that only 3 per cent of UK trauma victims receive it within one hour. 

Experts from the UK and France found that an injection of tranexamic acid, pictured, reduces traumatic injury death rates by up to a third — if administered within an hour (stock image)

In their study,

Nurses save mom and newborn after she gives birth while intubated for COVID-19

Jacklyn Rodriguez was 28 weeks pregnant when she was diagnosed with COVID-19.

Jacklyn Rodriguez was 28 weeks pregnant when she was diagnosed with COVID-19 and intubated. While sedated, nurses helped her give birth to her son 10 weeks early in an effort to save both of their lives.

“When they woke me up, and they told me the baby was born, I remember touching my stomach to feel like, ‘Wait, am I understanding what they’re saying?’” Rodriguez told ABC News.

Rodriguez said that when her COVID-19 symptoms worsened, she was admitted to Tufts Medical Center in Boston, where she was immediately transferred to the surgical intensive care unit and intubated.

“Even with forcing as much oxygen as we can into her, her oxygen levels are not staying high enough,” Angela Derochers, the nurse manager at Tufts Medical Center for OB-GYN, robotics and urology told ABC News. “And so we called the OB attending [physician] up, and he looked at me and he said, ‘We need to deliver this baby because they could both die.’”

“When they tell you that she’s really bad — ‘We got to do this now, if you don’t do this, she’s getting worse and both are going to be in danger’ — I couldn’t believe it, man. I was like, ‘Oh my god.’ I was nervous. I was really nervous,” said father and husband Raul Luzardo.

Derochers said: “I was just in shock. She was still intubated. … She literally had machines breathing for her and circulating her blood.”

Rodriguez was put on an ECMO machine to help pump blood through her body, so her heart and lungs could rest after the birth, according to Tufts hospital staff. Less than a day later, she woke up.

“I had no knowledge that he was being born. I was sedated,” she said. “It broke my heart a little bit, but it’s OK because I’m alive and he’s alive.”

Rodriguez, who was unable to meet her baby, named Julian, because she still tested positive for COVID-19, spent the next few weeks recovering.

“I was grateful to God to be alive. I was so grateful that he was OK. But not being able to hold him and be the first person to