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Trump says he wants to hold a rally on Saturday after his doctor cleared him to resume public events.

President Trump’s doctor said on Thursday that the president had completed his treatments to alleviate the symptoms of the coronavirus and that he anticipated Mr. Trump would be able to resume “public engagements” on Saturday.

The forecast about Mr. Trump’s condition came from the White House physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in a note updating people on his health.

As of Friday morning, it has been one week since Mr. Trump announced that he had tested positive for the virus, though neither he nor White House officials have disclosed when he last tested negative before that announcement.

Thursday night, the president called in to Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News and said he wanted to hold a rally in Florida on Saturday and another in Pennsylvania on Sunday. He went on to say he was in “great shape” — even as he paused on a few occasions and seemed to cough or clear his throat — and again presented the monoclonal antibody treatment he received as a miracle cure, even though there is no final clinical trial data to evaluate its effectiveness.

Mr. Trump did not give a clear answer when Mr. Hannity asked if he had tested negative for the coronavirus: He first said he wouldn’t get an “actual test” until Friday — today — then suggested that he had already had a test and that it had found “very little infection or virus, if any,” and then said: “I don’t know if they found any. I didn’t go into it greatly with the doctors.”

In the note on Thursday, Dr. Conley said Mr. Trump had remained “stable” and “devoid” of symptoms that would suggest the illness was progressing.

“Saturday will be Day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” Dr. Conley said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say those who test positive for the coronavirus should isolate themselves from others for a minimum of 10 days after testing positive, or for at least 10 days after symptoms first appear. Some people with a moderate or severe case of the virus can stay infectious for 20 days or perhaps even longer, according to the C.D.C.

Shortly after Dr. Conley’s memo, Mr. Trump’s re-election campaign released a statement calling for the second presidential debate to take place as originally scheduled. “There is therefore no medical reason why the Commission on Presidential Debates should shift the debate to a virtual setting, postpone it or otherwise alter it in any way,” the statement said.

On the Fox News show, Mr. Hannity suggested that Mr. Trump should organize his own debate.

“Well, I might,” Mr. Trump said, adding that he would want a “fair anchor” — perhaps, he said, Sean Hannity.

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Trump’s doctor says he’s completed his Covid-19 treatments and can return to ‘public engagements’ on Saturday.

President Trump’s doctor said on Thursday that he’s completed his treatments to alleviate the symptoms of the coronavirus and that he anticipates that the president will be able to resume “public engagements” on Saturday.

The forecast about Mr. Trump’s condition came from the White House physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in a note updating people on his health. Mr. Trump announced shortly before 1 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 2, that he and the first lady, Melania Trump, had tested positive for the virus; White House officials have declined to say when he last tested negative.

He was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Friday afternoon. Officials initially described the president’s symptoms as mild, but The Times and other news organizations reported Saturday that Mr. Trump had been administered supplemental oxygen because his blood oxygen dropped to a level that was concerning. His lung scans had “expected findings,” Dr. Conley said on Sunday, although he declined to say what that meant.

In the note on Thursday, Dr. Conley said that Mr. Trump has remained “stable” and “devoid” of symptoms that would suggest the illness was progressing.

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” Dr. Conley said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says those who test positive for the coronavirus should isolate themselves from others for a minimum of 10 days after testing positive, or for at least 10 days after symptoms first appear. Some people with a moderate or severe case of the virus can stay infectious for 20 days or perhaps even longer, according to the C.D.C.

Shortly after Dr. Conley’s memo, Mr. Trump’s re-election campaign released a statement calling for the second presidential debate to take place as originally scheduled. “There is therefore no medical reason why the Commission on Presidential Debates should shift the debate to a virtual setting, postpone it, or otherwise alter it in any way,” the statement said.

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Trump’s Physician Says He Is ‘Safe’ to Begin ‘Public Engagements’ on Saturday

The president is saying that he feels “great.” He is saying that the heavy steroid he is on is “not a heavy steroid.” He is saying lucid things on the White House lawn, like: “We’re taking care of our seniors, you’re not vulnerable, but they like to say ‘the vulnerable,’ but you’re the least vulnerable, but for this one thing you are vulnerable.”



a man standing in front of a cloudy blue sky: Getty Images


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On Thursday night, President Trump’s physician agreed with the gist of his recent comments on his own health. In a memo, Dr. Sean Conley stated that “based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements by Saturday,” which will have been 10 days since his positive coronavirus test was announced.

A bounty of questions remain. On Thursday, in the same interview in which he told Fox Business Network that the parents of soldiers killed in action may have given him COVID-19, he said that he would be taking dexamethasone for a “little bit longer.” How will Trump feel once he’s off a steroid that is known for giving patients boosts of energy and bouts of euphoria? Will Americans without the benefit of his taxpayer-subsidized health-care gain access to Regeneron, a drug Trump has called a “cure” — and a drug that was developed using tests on fetal tissue derived from abortion, a process that the Trump administration suspended federal funding for in June 2019. Will the White House actually take its pandemic precautions seriously now that around three dozen patients have been infected during its outbreak? Most importantly, will Trump be testing negatively by the weekend? Dr. Conley’s letter notably does not address whether or not the president is still testing positive. Judging from the administration’s opacity during the crisis so far, most of these questions will remain unanswered.

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As Trump waits to break his entirely porous quarantine, he is keeping busy.

On Thursday, he spent an hour on the phone with Fox Business and is expected to call into Hannity at 9 p.m. On Friday, the president — having cleared his workload, apparently — will guest-host Rush Limbaugh’s three-hour radio show.

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Trump experienced oxygen drops Friday and Saturday, but he could be discharged Monday, doctor says

  • President Trump experienced two drops in his oxygen levels over the course of his coronavirus illness but has improved and may be discharged as soon as Monday, Trump’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, said. 
  • The president has been administered dexamethasone, a steroid that treats inflammation in Covid-19 patients and has been shown to help patients with severe or critical Covid-19. 
  • Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA chief in the Trump administration, told CNBC’s Shepard Smith that he’s more concerned now about the president’s condition than he was before the Sunday briefing, citing the president’s dexamethasone treatment.  



a man wearing a suit and tie: White House physician Sean Conley answers questions surrounded by other doctors, during an update on the condition of US President Donald Trump, on October 4, 2020, at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.


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White House physician Sean Conley answers questions surrounded by other doctors, during an update on the condition of US President Donald Trump, on October 4, 2020, at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

President Donald Trump experienced two drops in his oxygen levels over the course of his coronavirus illness but has improved and may be discharged as soon as Monday, Trump’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, said Sunday. 

“The president has continued to improve,” Conley told reporters outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump is being treated. “As with any illness, there are frequent ups and downs over the course.”

However, Conley also disclosed that the 74-year-old Trump had been administered dexamethasone, a steroid that is usually given to patients with serious cases of Covid-19. Because it is generally not used in mild or moderate Covid-19 cases. several medical experts expressed greater concerns about the president’s condition.

“If they are going to discharge him tomorrow, that would mean he is virus negative. I don’t think that’s possible,” said Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former head of the Food and Drug Administration under Trump.

Trump also completed a second dose of remdesivir on Saturday. 

The president’s doctors did not disclose the exact timing of Trump’s drop in oxygen levels or whether his lung scans showed damage from the disease. 

Conley said Trump was doing well Thursday night into Friday morning and was only experiencing mild symptoms with his blood oxygen levels in the high 90s. 

Conley said that by late Friday morning the president was running a high fever and his oxygen saturation levels had dipped below 94%. Healthy adults generally have blood oxygen levels of 95% or higher. 

“Given these developments, I was concerned for possible rapid progression of the illness,” Conley said. 

Trump was then given supplemental oxygen and “after about a minute” his levels were back above 95%. The president was on supplemental oxygen for about an hour Friday, Conley said. 

On Saturday, Trump’s oxygen saturation dipped to about 93%, the doctor said. It’s unclear if he was given oxygen on Saturday. The doctors monitored Trump and his oxygen levels went back up. The president’s blood oxygen level is currently at 98%, Conley said Sunday.

Still, doctors said Trump could be discharged as early as Monday to continue his treatment at the White House. The president has entered his third day in the hospital on Sunday after contracting

Washington Reports 609 Coronavirus Cases Saturday

SEATTLE — Officials reported 609 more confirmed cases of the coronavirus Saturday. No new deaths were reported, as the state no longer updates the death toll over the weekend.

Though 609 cases is significantly less than the nearly 700 new cases reported Friday, it does continue a recent trend of higher daily case counts than the state saw for most of September.

As of the latest report from the Washington state Department of Health, a total of 89,419 coronavirus cases have been confirmed in laboratories and 2,142 people have died of COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

Meanwhile, 1,922,956 coronavirus tests have been performed in Washington state. Over the past week, 3.3 percent of tests have come back positive, up from the same time last week. The state’s goal is to test widely enough that that number falls below 2 percent.

The state is not only pulling away from meeting that key metric, but is also losing ground on another important success metric: the number of coronavirus cases per every 100,000 residents. Over the past two weeks, Washington saw 75.5 new coronavirus cases per every 100,000 Washingtonians, up from around 70 last Saturday. The goal is to have fewer than 25.

Total coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths by county:

County

Confirmed Cases

Hospitalizations

Deaths

Adams

875

52

10

Asotin

126

13

3

Benton

4,656 (+29)

391 (+1)

132

Chelan

1,874 (+6)

76

16

Clallam

237 (+1)

7

1

Clark

3,429 (+41)

291

68

Columbia

14

3

1

Cowlitz

695 (+5)

43

7

Douglas

1,193 (+1)

60

9

Ferry

30

1

0

Franklin

4,374 (+23)

315

66

Garfield

13

0

0

Grant

3,027 (+12)

153

22

Grays Harbor

542 (+9)

38

10

Island

318 (+1)

37

12

Jefferson

72 (+1)

12 (+1)

0

King

22,916 (+167)

2,447 (+10)

767

Kitsap

1,262 (+8)

100 (+1)

14

Kittitas

553 (+1)

24

22

Klickitat

199 (+2)

11

3

Lewis

580 (+13)

44

5

Lincoln

60 (+2)

3

1

Mason

434 (+1)

23

7

Okanogan

1,057

47

10

Pacific

88 (+2)

8

3

Pend Oreille

77 (+6)

6

0

Pierce

8,247 (+67)

873 (+3)

207

San Juan

29

2

0

Skagit

1,124 (+5)

98

22

Skamania

65

6

1

Snohomish

7,122 (+39)

827 (+3)

212

Spokane

7,254 (+67)

510 (+3)

172

Stevens

193 (+4)

18 (+1)

3

Thurston

1,175 (+16)

110 (+1)

19

Wahkiakum

7 (+1)

0

0

Walla Walla

927 (+5)

54

5

Whatcom

1,384 (+7)

100

46

Whitman

1,374 (+26)

4 (+1)

0

Yakima

11,489 (+18)

797 (+1)

262 (-1)

Unassigned

328 (+23)

7

4 (+1)

Total

89,419 (+609)

7,611 (+25)

2,142

The above numbers are provided by the state Department of Health, and some numbers differ from the totals provided separately by county health agencies.

This article originally appeared on the Gig Harbor Patch

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1,484 New Cases, 29 Deaths Reported Saturday

ATLANTA, GA — The Georgia Department of Public Health in Atlanta reported a total of 322,078 confirmed cases of COVID-19 at 2:50 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 3. According to the health department’s website, that includes 1,484 newly confirmed cases over the last 24 hours.

Georgia also reported 7,134 deaths so far from COVID-19, with 29 more deaths recorded in the last 24 hours. In addition, the state reported 28,924 hospitalizations — 133 more than the day before — and 5,354 admissions so far to intensive-care units.

No information is available from Georgia about how many patients have recovered.

Counties in or near metro Atlanta and other metropolitan areas continue to have the highest number of positives, with Fulton County still in the lead.

  1. Fulton County: 27,994 cases — 139 new

  2. Gwinnett County: 27,986 cases — 142 new

  3. Cobb County: 19,968 cases — 96 new

  4. DeKalb County: 19,084 cases — 54 new

  5. Hall County: 9,617 cases — 50 new

  6. Chatham County: 8,646 — 50 new

  7. Richmond County: 7,245 — 25 new

  8. Clayton County: 7,159 — 38 new

  9. Cherokee County: 6,218 — 33 new

  10. Bibb County: 6,128 — 13 new

Counties in or near metro Atlanta also continue to have the most deaths from COVID-19.

  1. Fulton County: 579 deaths

  2. Cobb County: 429 deaths

  3. Gwinnett County: 414 deaths — 2 new

  4. DeKalb County: 371 deaths

  5. Dougherty County: 188 deaths — 1 new

  6. Bibb County: 177 deaths — 2 new

  7. Muscogee County: 170 deaths

  8. Chatham County: 167 deaths — 1 new

  9. Richmond County: 166 deaths

  10. Clayton County: 162 deaths

As of Saturday, Georgia has administered more than 3.3 million COVID-19 tests, with about 9 percent of those tests the less reliable ones used to detect antibodies.

For the more reliable test for the virus itself, 10.1 percent of tests came back positive. For the less reliable test for antibodies, 8.4 percent came back positive. The overall positive rate was about 10 percent.

As more Georgians were tested over the last month, the percentage of positive tests inched upward from about 8 percent to more than 10 percent. However, over the last few weeks, the percentage of positives has stabilized at about 10 percent. According to the World Health Organization, positive test results should no more than 5 percent for two weeks before reopening for business as usual. Georgia largely reopened for business in April and May, and since then Gov. Brian Kemp has promoted the use of face masks but has steadfastly refused to mandate them.

All Georgia statistics are available on the state’s COVID-19 website.

Globally, more than 34.7 million people have tested positive for COVID-19, and more than 1 million people have died from it, Johns Hopkins University reported Saturday.

In the United States, more than 7.3 million people have been infected and more than 209,000 people have died from COVID-19 as of Saturday. The U.S. has only about 4 percent of the world’s population but more confirmed cases and deaths than any other country.

This article originally appeared on the