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Eli Lilly says other COVID-19 antibody drug trials ongoing after study halted for safety concern

By Carl O’Donnell and Michael Erman



a large building: FILE PHOTO: Eli Lilly logo is shown on one of their offices in San Diego


© Reuters/MIKE BLAKE
FILE PHOTO: Eli Lilly logo is shown on one of their offices in San Diego

(Reuters) – Eli Lilly & Co on Wednesday said other trials of its experimental coronavirus antibody therapy remain on track after a government-run study testing the treatment in hospitalized COVID-19 patients was paused due to safety concerns.

Lilly said on Tuesday that an independent safety monitoring board requested a pause in the trial, called ACTIV-3, due to a potential safety issue.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is collaborating with Lilly on the trial, said the advisory board paused the trial after seeing a “difference in clinical status” between patients on Lilly’s drug on those who received a placebo, without providing further detail.

Lilly on Wednesday said the paused trial is distinct from others it is conducting because it focuses on hospitalized patients who are more severely ill and being treated with other drugs as well, including Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral remdesivir.

The company had already asked U.S. regulators for an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the antibody drug, called bamlanivimab or LY-CoV555, to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 patients, based on interim data from a different study in those less severe illness. It is also testing the drug in nursing homes to see if it can prevent staff and residents from getting infected.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the status of the EUA application.

LY-CoV555 is similar to the experimental dual-antibody therapy from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc that was used to treat U.S. President Donald Trump. That treatment is also awaiting clearance by U.S. regulators.

Trump touted both drugs as being tantamount to cures in a video he posted last week after being released from the hospital.

Lilly said in a statement that these type of treatments may prove to be less beneficial for hospitalized patients than for those with more mild cases of the disease. A Lilly spokeswoman declined to comment further on why the trial was halted.

The paused trial is being conducted in partnership with the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of the NIH that is working with several drugmakers on COVID-19 treatments and vaccines.

It was halted at the request of an independent oversight panel, called a Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB). It is not uncommon to pause drug trials to investigate safety concerns, and such actions do not necessarily indicate a serious problem.

“Lilly trusts the judgment of the independent DSMB and supports its decisions to exercise caution in ensuring the safety of the patients participating in this study,” the company said in a statement.

(Reporting by Carl O’Donnell; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Bill Berkrot)

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Venture-Backed ‘Sentinel Occupational Safety’ Introduces ‘Safety as a Service’ for hazardous and confined space workers

SafeGuard by Sentinel Occupational Safety

With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
With SafeGuard, a safety manager can oversee the health and safety status of multiple workers simultaneously, including their location, various physiological health indicators, hazards, and stressors.
  • Aptima Ventures and Accelerant fund spin-off of technology developed for US Air Force

  • Sentinel’s SafeGuard offering provides ‘Safety as a Service’ to monitor and protect workers in dangerous industrial environments

  • Patented fusion engine combines sensors, data, and AI for personalized real-time monitoring and alerting

WOBURN, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — With millions of workers injured and killed annually in hazardous industrial workplace environments, Sentinel Occupational Safety Inc., a new venture-backed startup, is introducing its ‘Safety as a Service’ platform known as SafeGuard™ to improve workplace safety through more preventive oversight.

SafeGuard’s unique IoT approach combines sensors, wearables, and AI analytics to intelligently and continuously monitor workers in a variety of dangerous occupational settings. From frontline firefighters and construction workers who face excessive heat, smoke, and pollution on the job, to those working inside dangerous confined spaces in the presence of noxious fumes, chemicals, and other hazards, workers face far greater risk of injury or death when inadequately monitored, working alone or remotely.

– 100 occupational fatalities each week are deemed preventable. Work-related injury and illness cause 500+ million annual lost workdays.*

How SafeGuard works
SafeGuard fuses a combination of environmental, human, and locational data from a worker’s sensors, analyzing it in the cloud and at the edge to provide real-time detection and alerting. For a mechanic welding inside a ship compartment, for example, algorithms assess their physiological, atmospheric, and other indicators, including heart rate, breathing, air quality, and motion, detecting risks such as dangerous levels of fuel vapors or low oxygen, and their health status.

Unlike current safety protocols that rely on one-to-one observers to check in with confined space workers at intervals, SafeGuard’s cloud-based monitoring enables a single safety manager to oversee the real-time health and safety of 15-20 workers simultaneously, even tracking their precise locations in GPS denied environments.

Predictive alerts and intuitive at-a-glance “green-yellow-red’ status indicators provide continuous, comprehensive monitoring for proactive injury prevention. In the case of high risk or man-down situations, SafeGuard’s built-in decision support capabilities facilitate the appropriate intervention, including emergency or medical response when seconds and minutes are crucial.

Commercializing defense innovation
Funded by Aptima Ventures and the Dayton-based Accelerant Fund, Sentinel was launched to commercialize an innovative ‘confined space monitoring system’ originally developed to improve safety oversight of US Air Force aviation maintenance personnel. The system developed by Aptima, Inc., Lockheed Martin, and the Air Force, and the basis of SafeGuard, will improve real-time incident detection and alerting for safer operations. It is also expected to boost Air Force productivity, allowing nearly 80% of personnel previously used in 1:1 worker monitoring to

Eli Lilly pauses trial of antibody drug Trump touted as COVID-19 ‘cure’ over safety concern

By Michael Erman and Carl O’Donnell

(Reuters) – Eli Lilly and Co said on Tuesday that the government-sponsored clinical trial of its COVID-19 antibody treatment similar to one taken by U.S. President Donald Trump has been paused because of a safety concern.

Trump touted the Lilly drug, along with the antibody treatment from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc that he received for his COVID-19, as tantamount to a cure in a video he posted last week.

The announcement comes one day after Johnson & Johnson said it was forced to pause a large high-profile trial of its experimental coronavirus vaccine because a volunteer fell ill. J&J said it does not yet know if that person was given the vaccine or a placebo.

AstraZeneca Plc’s U.S. trial for its experimental COVID-19 vaccine has also been on hold for over a month after a volunteer in its UK study fell ill. Trials of that vaccine resumed in other regions after a brief halt.

Lilly said earlier this month it was applying for emergency use authorization (EUA) for the antibody drug, LY-CoV555, for patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 based on data from another clinical trial.

It is not uncommon to pause drug trials to investigate safety concerns, and such actions do not necessarily indicate a serious problem. Because of the urgent need for drugs and vaccines to tackle a pandemic that has claimed over 1 million lives worldwide – and the speed with which they are being developed – these trials have come under intense scrutiny.

“Out of an abundance of caution, the ACTIV-3 independent data safety monitoring board (DSMB) has recommended a pause in enrollment,” Lilly spokeswoman Molly McCully said in an emailed statement. “Lilly is supportive of the decision by the independent DSMB to cautiously ensure the safety of the patients participating in this study.”

The Indianapolis-based drugmaker did not comment on the implications for the paused trial, called ACTIV-3, which is testing the treatment on COVID-19 patients who require hospitalization, or on its other ongoing trials. It is also testing the drug in nursing homes to see if it can prevent staff and residents from getting infected.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health did not immediately reply to requests for comment.

Lilly began its ACTIV-3 trial in August and is aiming to recruit 10,000 patients primarily in the United States.

The trial compares patients who receive its antibody drug plus Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir with those who receive remdesivir alone.

Lilly sought the EUA from U.S. regulators after publishing data in September showing LY-CoV555 helped cut hospitalization and emergency room visits for COVID-19 patients. The treatment is being developed with Canadian biotech AbCellera.

Lilly shares closed nearly 3%.

(Reporting by Michael Erman and Carl O’Donnell in New York; Additional reporting by Deena Beasley in Los Angeles; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

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Eli Lilly antibody trial paused over safety concerns

Checking in: The trial design calls for the data and safety monitoring board to examine results from the first 300 participants — including their need for supplemental oxygen, mechanical ventilation or other supportive care five days after receiving the treatment or a placebo — before proceeding with further enrollment.

The NIAID trial has so far enrolled 326 patients. An agency spokesperson said that the board overseeing the trial this morning “reached a predefined boundary for safety at day five.” The board will now decide whether the trial should add 700 more participants.

The NIAID spokesperson added that the pause in enrollment is “out of an abundance of caution” and the safety board is “continuing data collection and follow-up of current participants for safety and efficacy.”

The late-stage study is examining whether Lilly’s antibody, known as bamlanivimab, could help hospitalized patients. The treatment is a monoclonal antibody that mimics the antibodies the body makes naturally. It’s similar to the Regeneron antibody cocktail that President Donald Trump received recently after being diagnosed with Covid-19.

Background: Last week, Lilly asked the FDA to grant an emergency-use authorization that would allow use of the antibody treatment in high-risk patients recently diagnosed with mild-to-moderate Covid-19.

That application is largely based on preliminary data from a Phase II trial released in mid-September that showed patients who received any dose of the antibody were less likely to be hospitalized or visit the ER.

What’s next: The data and safety monitoring board overseeing the trial will review data again at a preplanned meeting on October 26. The board will recommend at that meeting whether or not enrollment should be resumed, according to NIAID.

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Eli Lilly’s Antibody Trial Is Paused Over Potential Safety Concern

A government-sponsored clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for Covid-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a “potential safety concern,” according to emails that government officials sent on Tuesday to researchers at testing sites. The company confirmed the pause.

The news comes just a day after Johnson & Johnson announced the pause of its coronavirus vaccine trial because of a sick volunteer, and a month after AstraZeneca’s vaccine trial was halted over concerns about two participants who had fallen ill after getting the company’s vaccine.

The Eli Lilly trial was designed to test the benefits of the antibody therapy on hundreds of people hospitalized with Covid-19, compared with a placebo. All of the study participants also received another experimental drug, remdesivir, which has become commonly used to treat coronavirus patients. It is unclear exactly what safety issues prompted the pause.

In large clinical trials, pauses are not unusual, and declines in health in volunteers are not necessarily the result of the experimental drug or vaccine. Such halts are meant to allow an independent board of scientific experts to review the data and determine whether the event may have been related to the treatment or occurred by chance.

“This is why clinical trials are essential,” said Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington. “The safety of the product has to be empirically proven.”

Enrollment for the Eli Lilly trial, which was sponsored by several branches of the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Veterans Affairs, among other organizations, had been continuing. But on Tuesday, multiple officials sent emails to researchers telling them to stop adding volunteers to the study out of an “abundance of caution.”

In a statement, an N.I.H. spokeswoman said the trial, which had enrolled 326 Covid-19 patients, was paused when the independent safety board found that after five days of treatment, the group of patients who had received the antibodies showed a different “clinical status” than the group who had received a saline placebo — a difference that crossed a predetermined threshold for safety.

The N.I.H. statement did not specify the nature of the participants’ conditions. But the so-called stopping rules for the trial lay out the conditions for “futility” — the idea that a treatment has a very low chance of working, based on the data so far. A trial could also be halted if there is evidence that patients in one group are faring much worse than those in the other.

Given the ambiguity in the statements released on Tuesday, all scenarios remain possible, said Dr. Eric Topol, a clinical trials expert at the Scripps Research Institute. “It’s so amorphous,” Dr. Topol said.

The safety board will review the data again on Oct. 26, and advise the N.I.H. on whether to resume the trial, the statement said. In the meantime, researchers will continue to collect data from people already enrolled in the study.

Several experts praised the trial’s sponsors for halting the trial to address

Safety Measures at Assisted Living Communities

The reasons for placing a loved one in an assisted living facility often boil down to one word: safety. When a sick or frail individual no longer can care for him or herself, the safest place may be such a community, where both medical care and physical safety can be assured.

(Getty Images)

Assisted living communities have numerous tools – some mandated by state and federal guidelines, some by individual rules – to protect their residents. There are numerous safety concerns, but the top three are:

  • Falls.
  • Wandering.
  • Infections, including COVID-19.

Keeping residents safe while allowing them some freedom isn’t easy, and safety programs do not follow a one-size-fits-all approach, says John Mastronardi, executive director of The Nathaniel Witherell, a short-term rehab and skilled nursing care center in Greenwich, Connecticut. Each resident has a personalized care plan because “they still have a personality and preferences you want to pay attention to that can inform and drive the care plan. The crux of this is getting to the core of that person’s preferences if you possibly can, then tailoring a plan of care so that they can thrive as best they can, safely.”

Falls

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention names falls as one of the leading causes of fatal and nonfatal injuries among people age 65 and older. In the past, those at high risk for falls were often restrained from moving, but the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services now precludes using restraints except where medically necessary.

Fall prevention begins at admittance, when the resident is screened for his or her risk of falling. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality also recommends rescreening quarterly, annually and when health conditions change.

To minimize risk, assisted living facilities:

  • Adjust medication to minimize side effects like dizziness and drowsiness. “We have a consulting pharmacist look at their meds, and at least monthly we try to trim them when we can,” says Dr. Elaine Healy, medical director and vice president of medical affairs at United Hebrew in New Rochelle, a senior living campus in Westchester County, New York.
  • Manage chronic and acute medical conditions carefully. Conditions like low blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, diabetes and many others increase fall risk. “Most falls occur near the bed and in the bedroom. They might have low blood sugar, don’t realize it, get up too fast and end up falling,” Mastronardi says.
  • Schedule bathroom breaks and other potentially unsafe behaviors. “We look at residents’ habits. If they are an early riser, we would anticipate them being active early and make sure their needs are met for eating and toileting, and engage them in activities to keep them busy and not want to move around,” Healy says.
  • Provide physical and occupational therapy. This can help residents work on balance, walking gait and strength.
  • Fix, adjust or remove environmental hazards, such as beds, walkers, flooring, furniture and clutter. For example, “We may use a raised-perimeter mattress to keep them from rolling off the bed or trying

U.S. pauses Eli Lilly’s trial of a coronavirus antibody treatment over safety concerns

  • Eli Lilly’s phase-three trial of its ACTIV-3 monoclonal antibody treatment for coronavirus has been paused due to potential safety concerns.
  • The ACTIV-3 trial is designed to test a monoclonal antibody developed by Eli Lilly in combination with remdesivir, an anti-viral with emergency use authorization for the virus.
  • It’s one of several ongoing trials, as part of the National Institute of Health’s “Activ” program, designed to accelerate the development of vaccine treatments in partnership with the pharmaceutical industry.



a group of people standing around a plane: In this May 2020 photo provided by Eli Lilly, researchers prepare mammalian cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory in Indianapolis.


© Provided by CNBC
In this May 2020 photo provided by Eli Lilly, researchers prepare mammalian cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory in Indianapolis.

Eli Lilly’s late-stage trial of its leading monoclonal antibody treatment for the coronavirus has been paused by U.S. health regulators over potential safety concerns, the company confirmed to CNBC on Tuesday.

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“Safety is of the utmost importance to Lilly. We are aware that, out of an abundance of caution, the ACTIV-3 independent data safety monitoring board (DSMB) has recommended a pause in enrollment,” a spokeswoman Molly McCully told CNBC. “Lilly is supportive of the decision by the independent DSMB to cautiously ensure the safety of the patients participating in this study.”

The company’s shares fell by about 3% in afternoon trading after the news started to leak out over Twitter.

The news comes less than 24 hours after Johnson & Johnson confirmed that its late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial was paused after a participant reported an “adverse event” the day before.

Dr. Mathai Mammen, global head of Janssen research and development at J&J, told investors on a conference call Tuesday that the company still has “very little information” on the reason for the holdup, including if the patient received the vaccine or the placebo. Preliminary information has been sent to the data safety monitoring board for review, he added.

Medical experts note that pauses in large clinical trials are not uncommon. They added it’s possible the bad reaction could be result of an unrelated illness, and not the drug itself. The review from the data and safety monitoring board will help determine that.

The ACTIV-3 trial is designed to test a monoclonal antibody developed by Eli Lilly in combination with Gilead Sciences’ remdesivir, an anti-viral with emergency use authorization for the virus. It’s one of several ongoing trials that are part of the National Institute of Health’s “Activ” program, which is designed to accelerate the development of Covid-19 vaccines and treatments. It is also backed by Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration’s effort to manufacturer and distribute vaccines to fight Covid-19.

Eli Lilly’s drug is part of a class of treatments known as monoclonal antibodies, which are made to act as immune cells that scientists hope can fight the virus. The treatment was developed using a blood sample from one of the first U.S. patients who recovered from Covid-19. AstraZeneca and Regeneron, among other companies, are also working on so-called antibody treatments.

Monoclonal antibody treatments hit the headlines this month after news broke

Coronavirus Safety Runs Into a Stubborn Barrier: Masculinity

On Tuesday, and not for the first time, Joseph R. Biden Jr. described President Trump’s reluctant attitude toward wearing masks as “macho.”

Tomi Lahren, a conservative commentator and Fox Nation host, countered that Mr. Biden “might as well carry a purse with that mask.”

They were among the most direct comments yet that have tied stereotypes about acting and appearing manly to the basic precautions that doctors, epidemiologists and other health experts recommend to prevent infection by the highly contagious and deadly coronavirus.

The theme has been there since the beginning of the pandemic. Some experts who study masculinity and public health say the perception that wearing masks and following social distancing guidelines are unmanly has carried a destructive cost. The virus has infected more men than women and killed far more of them.

The experts say the best public health practices have collided with several of the social demands men in many cultures are pressured to follow to assert their masculinity: displaying strength instead of weakness, showing a willingness to take risks, hiding their fear, appearing to be in control.

Men’s resistance to showing weakness — and their tendency to take risks — was demonstrated by scientists long before Covid-19. Studies have shown men are less likely than women to wear seatbelts and helmets, or to get flu shots. They’re more likely to speed or drive drunk. They are less likely to seek out medical care.

Some initial research indicates a similar pattern is playing out with the coronavirus. Surveys have found that women are more likely than men to wear masks in the United States. And recent polls have found men give higher marks to President Trump than women on his handling of the pandemic.

“To admit you’re threatened is to appear weak, so you have to have this bravado,” said Peter Glick, a professor of social sciences at Lawrence University. If you wear a mask, he said, “the underlying message is: ‘I’m afraid of catching this disease.’”

This is not a new problem for those who work in public health messaging. Stacey Hust, an associate professor of communication at Washington State University, said prevention campaigns around sexual assault often try to appeal to masculine ideals, making better behaviors “worthy of the alpha male.”

It tends to be more difficult to reach those who identify strongly with traditional masculine characteristics. As an example, the more someone identifies with those masculine traits, the less likely that person will be to use condoms during sex, she said.

“I think that translates really clearly into why some men choose not to wear masks,” she said. “It’s really about not wanting to show weakness or fear, not wanting to show any vulnerability.”

Mr. Biden, who has modeled wearing masks and adhering to social distancing guidelines, has consistently criticized Mr. Trump for his approach to his personal coronavirus precautions. In May, he called Mr. Trump “falsely masculine” for his refusal to wear a mask, and

Fox News viewers use fewer Covid-19 safety precautions than CNN viewers, study finds

Viewers who trust Fox News coverage more than CNN’s are slightly less likely to take preventative measures against the novel coronavirus and a little more likely to put themselves at risk, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal BMJ Global Health.



Donald Trump, Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham are posing for a picture


© Pool/Fox News


“Health messaging, despite being one of the few effective ways to slow down the spread of the virus in the absence of a vaccine, is doomed to fail if the media prioritize political interests over population health,” said study authors Erfei Zhao and Qiao Wu, who are both PhD students at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: trump siegel split


© getty images/fox news
trump siegel split

Among the nearly 5,000 adults who participated in an online survey every two weeks from March to June, around 29% said they trusted CNN more than Fox; about half (52%) expressed no preference, and one in five (20%) said they trusted Fox more than CNN.

Devotees of Fox News consistently practiced more risky behaviors — such as going out to a bar or club, attending gatherings of more than 10 people or visiting others in their homes — than CNN viewers, the study found.

In addition, the study found Fox News enthusiasts consistently practiced fewer preventative measures — such as wearing a mask, sanitizing hands, avoiding restaurants and canceling social plans — than CNN fans.

“The most we can take away from the study is that there is a correlation between news preference (at the beginning of the study) and frequency of infection-mitigating behaviors — a relationship that strengthens over time,” said Christopher Federico, who directs the University of Minnesota’s Center for the Study of Political Psychology, in an email.

“This ‘suggests’ that there is something about the different news sources that influences behavior, but we cannot conclude that for sure given the methodology,” said Federico, who was not involved in the study.

The study’s authors noted that the research was “observational, and as such, can’t establish cause.”

“That said, there is some evidence from other studies — using better methodologies — that exposure to Fox does have a causal effect on certain behaviors (e.g., voting),” Federico said.

Trust in news seems to affect behavior

The new study analyzed data from the Understanding America Study, an ongoing longitudinal national online survey of approximately 9,000 US adults. Every two weeks from March 10 to June 9, participants were asked questions about how they had protected themselves from Covid-19 over the last seven days, among other things.

The final analysis looked at data from 4,863 respondents who completed questionnaires every two weeks without fail.

CNN viewers were most likely to follow protective guidelines issued by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and others, followed by those who had no preference in their media choice.

Viewers who trusted CNN for their news on Covid-19 engaged in an average of 3.85 preventative behaviors during the study period, while people who

Patient Safety Authority Launches Statewide Campaign “Knock out the Flu, PA”

Patient Safety Authority Launches Statewide Campaign “Knock out the Flu, PA”

PR Newswire

HARRISBURG, Pa., Oct. 8, 2020

HARRISBURG, Pa., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Patient Safety Authority (PSA) has kicked off Knock out the Flu, PA—a comprehensive campaign that urges Pennsylvanians to get a flu shot.

A new white board video explains in simple terms the science behind the flu shot and its benefits, while debunking common myths: No, you cannot get the flu from the flu shot, and yes, you need one every year.
A new white board video explains in simple terms the science behind the flu shot and its benefits, while debunking common myths: No, you cannot get the flu from the flu shot, and yes, you need one every year.

The advocacy effort includes a whiteboard video that explains in simple terms the science behind the flu shot and its benefits, while debunking common myths: No, you cannot get the flu from the flu shot, and yes, you need one every year. A social media campaign featuring influencers and everyday citizens is also underway. All Pennsylvanians are encouraged to join the flu shot challenge by getting vaccinated and posting a photo with the hashtag #KnockOutTheFluPA.

Last year in Pennsylvania, there were 130,000 influenza cases. While some cases are mild, many lead to hospitalization or death. Fighting the flu also weakens your immune system, which increases susceptibility to other illnesses, like COVID-19. That’s why the flu shot is more important now than ever. October and November are ideal months to get it to keep you protected through the whole flu season.

“Our immune systems are already strained by the stress of the pandemic and our healthcare system can’t take another battle, especially one that can be prevented or significantly knocked back,” says Regina Hoffman, PSA executive director. “Getting a flu shot also makes it less likely that you’ll give the virus to someone else. We urge every Pennsylvanian to do their part.”

Flu Shots are Readily Available
Most insurance companies cover the cost of a flu shot, which are available at physicians’ offices, pharmacies, grocery stores, and clinics throughout the Commonwealth. Find locations here.

For those who don’t have insurance, several county and city health departments and health systems are offering or are planning free clinics. Among them:

Allegheny County 
Allentown Health Bureau 
Bethlehem Health Bureau
Central PA – Geisinger Health System 
Lehigh Valley Health Network 
Montgomery County 
Philadelphia 
Wilkes-Barre Health Department

Established under the Medical Care Availability and Reduction of Error (MCARE) Act of 2002, the PSA, an independent state agency, collects and analyzes patient safety data to improve safety outcomes and help prevent patient harm. http://patientsafety.pa.gov/

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SOURCE Patient Safety Authority

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