Showing: 1 - 10 of 16 RESULTS

As wind drops and stubble smoulders, smog returns to New Delhi

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Air quality in India’s capital, New Delhi, deteriorated sharply on Tuesday as wind died down just as the burning of crop waste in fields sent smoke billowing across the north of the country.

A smoggy haze settled over the city, reducing visibility significantly, as the Air Quality Index (AQI) rose past 300 on a scale of 500, indicating “very poor” conditions that pose a risk of respiratory problems, according to the federal pollution control board’s guidance.

“Wind speed was supposed to pick up due to a deep depression in the Bay of Bengal, but that did not happen,” SAFAR, India’s main environment monitoring agency, said in its daily bulletin.

Lower wind speeds let deadly pollutants like PM2.5 particles hang in the air.

PM2.5, particles that are less than 2.5 microns in diameter, can be carried deep into the lungs, causing deadly diseases, including cancer and cardiac problems.

“The AQI is likely to be in the very poor to a poor category for the next two days,” SAFAR said, as the burning of crop waste, which accounts for about a quarter of air pollution in winter months, picked up.

Every winter, a thick blanket of smog settles over northern India as a combination of factors such as the burning of stubble in fields, industrial emissions and vehicle exhaust brings a spike in pollution.

Since Oct. 1, Delhi’s average AQI was more than 36% higher than the figures for the same period a year ago, according to data compiled by Reuters.

Up until September, New Delhi and its satellite cities, which last year accounted for half of the dozen most-polluted cities worldwide, had enjoyed respite due to a strict lockdown to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Reporting by Neha Arora; Editing by Mayank Bhardwaj, Robert Birsel

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Trump campaign manager returns to office 10 days after positive COVID-19 test

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDes Moines mayor says he’s worried about coronavirus spread at Trump rally Judiciary Committee Democrats pen second letter to DOJ over Barrett disclosures: ‘raises more questions that it answers’ Trump asks campaign to schedule daily events for him until election: report MORE‘s campaign manager Bill StepienBill StepienTrump Jr. returning to campaign trail after quarantining The Memo: Trump searches for path to comeback Bob Dole claims no Republicans on debate commission support Trump MORE resumed working at the campaign’s Virginia headquarters on Monday, 10 days after he tested positive for COVID-19.

Stepien told reporters on a conference call that he was back in the office after his recent positive test, “in full accordance with” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines.

The CDC guidelines say adults with mild to moderate COVID-19 cases can be around others 10 days after the onset of symptoms so long as they have gone 24 hours without a fever and other symptoms are improving. Severe cases require longer isolation periods. Public health experts have also encouraged individuals to obtain two negative tests before resuming regular activities.

Stepien, 42, tested positive on Oct. 2 and dealt with mild flu-like symptoms, the campaign said at the time. He went into quarantine and worked from home until Monday.

Stepien did not say on Monday’s call whether he had tested negative for the virus but cited being beyond the 10 day window from the onset of symptoms for his decision to return to the office.

“We take a lot of precautions here at the headquarters every single day,” Stepien said, pointing to signage about health protocols and noting that the campaign has a nurse on staff to ensure everyone is healthy.

Stepien’s decision to resume working in-person reflects the broader attitude of the president and his team toward the virus, which has killed more than 210,000 people in the U.S. and infected nearly 8 million.

Trump, who revealed that he had tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 2, is set to resume campaign rallies on Monday night in Florida despite the White House refusing to say when he last tested negative, and some top White House officials, such as chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsAdministration officials call on Congress to immediately pass bill to spend unused PPP funds Trump claims he is ‘immune’ from coronavirus, defends federal response Senate Republicans rip new White House coronavirus proposal MORE, have continued to work from the building despite being in close contact with the president, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and others who have tested positive. 

The president’s physician said late Saturday that Trump is no longer a risk to spread the virus but stopped short of saying he had tested negative.

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Fitness competition returns to Delray Beach gym

DEKA STRONG, a socially distanced fitness competition, will take place at Slash Fitness in Delray Beach on Saturday, Oct. 24.

The event is a follow-up to the successful and safe “DEKAFIT STRONG Activation,” which took place in August at Slash Fitness and featured 50 gym members as well as 10 gyms from around the state for a “Battle of the Gyms” competition.

“It’s been a rough few months for many of us when it comes to working out, staying fit and challenging ourselves,” said Slash Fitness co-owner Joe Ardagna. “As humans, we need goals, and in hosting this event, it is our hope to motivate participants to try hard, push themselves, and get stronger and healthier overall. We look forward to hosting this fun and memorable event in a safe manner.”

DEKAFIT, a premium, functional fitness program by the creators of Spartan, is hosting the competition for all local fitness enthusiasts.

“We wanted to bring to Delray an incredible fitness program, test and competition, something for the fitness enthusiast to look forward to,” Ardagna said. “A program that many others got to experience firsthand about two months ago when 140 participants came to earn their DEKAMARK (overall time) by completing 10 functional fitness stations safely and socially distant.

“The all levels DEKAFIT course was built to 10 ‘x’ your motivation, community and performance,” Ardagna said. “In a world of so much uncertainty, we wanted to bring to our communities a consistent individual competition, in a safe and effective way, that will challenge anyone to be their best both physically, and mentally time and time again. It’s in our DNA, we crave competition, we knew we had the answer.”

Ardagna said whether the individual is looking to challenge themselves for the first time in the DEKA arena, or a repeat participant looking to improve their overall score, it’s open to everyone.

DEKAFIT will put your body and mind through a series of challenges that will test all muscle groups, functional movement patterns and the aerobic engine with DEKA Zones ranging from Squats, Rowing, Med Ball Sit-Up Throws, Box Jumps or Step Ups, Farmer’s Carry, Ski Erg, Tank Sled Push/Pull, Air Bike, Dead Ball Wall-Overs, and Burpees.

“The energy throughout the room on DEKAFIT day is contagious; we expect many of the 140 from our last competition to come back, plus many more,” he said.

Space for the Oct. 24 event is limited and the cost per person is $39. Time slots start at 8 a.m. and run until noon. Slash Fitness is at 290 SE Sixth Ave., #2, in Delray Beach.

Sign up at deka.fit. Call 561-865-5716 or visit SlashFitPro.com.

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©2020 the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

Visit the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) at www.sun-sentinel.com

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Trump returns from Walter Reed, White House backs FDA vaccine guidelines

The White House has reportedly backed away from a battle with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has been advancing a timeline for a coronavirus vaccine that suggested an approval wouldn’t happen before Election Day.

The FDA has said it will need two months of observation in late-stage trials of any coronavirus vaccine in order to consider an emergency use authorization — an objective that conflicted with President Donald Trump’s desire to have an inoculation by early November. However, the White House signed off on the new guidelines Tuesday afternoon, backing away from a potential standoff that had worried health experts.

Trump, fresh from a stint in the hospital after being diagnosed with COVID-19, re-ignited the political debate over a vaccine timeline, putting him at odds with the FDA. In a video Monday evening, Trump also said that “vaccines are coming, momentarily” — even as FDA guidelines suggest a release wouldn’t happen until well after Election Day.

Trump said as much late Tuesday on Twitter, tagging FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn while posting, “New FDA Rules make it more difficult for them to speed up vaccines for approval before Election Day. Just another political hit job!”

The White House was previously citing pharmaceutical companies’ objections to the two-month period.

Pfizer (PFE) CEO Albert Bourla said Tuesday the company has not been in touch with the White House on the topic and “we believe (FDA)’s independence is today more important than ever as public trust in (COVID-19) vaccine development has been eroded by the politicization of the process.”

In interviews in the past 24 hours, FDA’s top vaccine official, Dr. Peter Marks said a minimum of 7 weeks would be acceptable.

“We’ve made it clear we want to see a median of two months of follow-up for any of the vaccines…while it would be nice to have much more, we have to balance the safety we get up front with the need to try to save lives,” Marks said in an interview with the Journal of the American Medical Association.

He added that an emergency use authorization of a vaccine is likely by the end of the year, since it only takes weeks to review an EUA filing, compared to months of review for a full license approval.

But even that EUA filing could remain a question. Moncef Slaoui, head of Operation. Warp Speed, said during a symposium co-hosted by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Washington that he has advised companies not to file for an EUA until they have enough vaccine to distribute.

A critical date will come on October 22, the date established by a key FDA advisory body to determine official guidelines, even though Trump could still override any decision made then.

“Data from Phase 3 studies that includes a median follow-up duration of at least two months after completion of the full vaccination regimen to help provide adequate information to assess a vaccine’s benefit-risk profile,” according to the Vaccines and Related

Trump Returns to Oval Office While Infected With Coronavirus | National News

President Donald Trump, who announced he tested positive for the coronavirus less than a week ago, returned to the Oval Office on Wednesday.

Photos: Donald Trump, the Past 2 Weeks

trump covid

According to the White House, Trump was being briefed on Hurricane Delta in the Gulf of Mexico and stimulus talks, which he has delivered conflicting messages about this week. The president returned from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to the White House on Monday evening where he removed his mask and posed for photos.

Chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters at the White House on Wednesday that if Trump “decides to go to the Oval, we’ve got safety protocols there.”

Trump’s doctor on Wednesday released a statement on the president’s health, saying he reports feeling great and has no coronavirus symptoms.

Lab work from Monday detected antibodies in Trump’s system that were not detectable as of last Thursday, Dr. Sean Conley said. However, Trump was administered an experimental antibody combination from Regeneron last week, and Conley did not address what role that treatment could play in the lab results.

A Regeneron spokeswoman told The New York Times that “given the volume of IgG antibodies delivered in our therapy, and the timing of these tests, it is likely that the second test is detecting” antibodies from the treatment.

Trump’s current treatment regimen is unclear. He was scheduled to receive a final dose of remdesivir on Tuesday, but his doctor did not mention the treatment in his brief updates Tuesday or Wednesday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention generally recommends a person who had coronavirus can resume being around others 10 days after symptom onset if they have been fever-free for 24 hours without the help of medication and other symptoms are improving.

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‘Don’t Be Afraid’ of COVID, Trump Says as He Returns to White House That Is Stalked by Illness | Top News

By Steve Holland and Alexandra Alper

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump told Americans “to get out there” and not fear COVID-19 as he returned to the White House on Monday after a three-night hospital stay to be treated for the virus and removed his white surgical mask to pose for pictures.

Asked how he felt on arrival at the White House, where his staff has been hit by infections and his re-election campaign dogged by the pandemic, Trump said: “Real good,” according to a pool report by a journalist covering his return on behalf of other media.

Trump wore a mask as he left the helicopter that flew him back from a military hospital outside Washington and climbed the stairs of the White House South Portico, where he removed it and posed for pictures, waving, saluting and giving thumbs-up signs.

He then turned to walk into the White House, his mask still in his pocket, TV footage showed.

Trump has played down a disease has killed more than 1 million people worldwide and more than 209,000 in the United States alone – the highest death toll of any country.

The Republican president, running for re-election against Democrat Joe Biden in the Nov. 3 U.S. election, was admitted to the Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday after being diagnosed with the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

“Don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it,” Trump said in a recorded video message. “We’re going back, we’re going back to work. We’re going to be out front. … Don’t let it dominate your lives. Get out there, be careful.”

Shortly after his return, a video with thunderous orchestral music posted to his Twitter handle showed him arriving at the White House and saluting from the South Portico as Marine One flew off. The video was quickly viewed nearly a million times.

Trump has repeatedly flouted social-distancing guidelines meant to curb the virus’ spread. He also mocked Biden at last Tuesday’s presidential debate for wearing a mask at events, even when he is far from others.

While it was unclear if Biden had seen Trump’s latest video, the Democrat, who leads in national opinion polls, stressed the seriousness of the disease and emphasized the importance of wearing masks.

“I would hope the president – having gone through what he went through and I’m glad he seems to be coming along pretty well – would communicate the right lesson to the American people. Masks matter,” Biden told an NBC News town hall in Miami.

Trump, 74, has not had a fever in more than 72 hours and his oxygen levels are normal, his medical team told reporters at the hospital where he was treated. The doctors declined, however, to discuss any toll the disease could have on the president’s lungs or disclose when Trump last tested negative for the coronavirus.

The team added that the president had received supplemental oxygen twice in recent days.

“He may not entirely be out of

Trump reports ‘no symptoms,’ returns to downplaying virus

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, said to be making progress in his recovery from COVID-19, tweeted his eagerness to return to the campaign trail Tuesday even as the outbreak that has killed more than 210,000 Americans reached ever more widely into the upper echelons of the U.S. government.

As Trump convalesced out of sight in the White House, the administration defended the protections it has put in place to protect the staff working there to treat and support him. Trump again publicly played down the virus on Twitter after his return from a three-day hospitalization, though even more aides tested positive, including one of his closest advisers, Stephen Miller.

In one significant national coronavirus action, Trump declared there would be no action before the election on economic-stimulus legislation — an announcement that came not long after the Federal Reserve chairman said such help was essential for recovery with the nation reeling from the human and economic cost of the pandemic. Stocks fell on the White House news.

As for Trump’s own recovery, his doctor, Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley, said in a letter that the president had a “restful” night at the White House and “reports no symptoms.”

Meanwhile, Trump was grappling with next political steps exactly four weeks from Election Day. Anxious to project strength, Trump, who is still contagious with the virus, tweeted Tuesday morning that he was planning to attend next week’s debate with Democrat Joe Biden in Miami and “It will be great!”

Biden, for his part, said he and Trump “shouldn’t have a debate” as long as the president remains COVID positive.


Biden told reporters in Pennsylvania that he’s “looking forward to being able to debate him” but said “we’re going to have to follow very strict guidelines.”

Elsewhere in the government, the scope of the outbreak was still being uncovered. On Tuesday, the nation’s top military leaders including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, and the vice chairman, Gen. John Hyten, were in quarantine after exposure to Adm. Charles W. Ray, the vice commandant of the Coast Guard.

It was not known how Ray contracted the virus, but he attended an event for military families at the White House on Sept. 27. The Coast Guard said in a statement that Ray felt mild symptoms over the weekend and was tested on Monday.

Also testing positive Tuesday was Miller, a top policy adviser and Trump speechwriter, who has been an architect of the president’s “America First” foreign policy and restrictive immigration measures. Miller’s wife, Katie Miller, who serves as communications director to Vice President Mike Pence, had the virus earlier this year. She had been in Salt Lake City with Pence where he is preparing to debate Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, but she left as soon as she found out about her husband’s diagnosis, officials said. She tested negative on Tuesday.

Trump on Monday made clear that he has little intention of abiding by best containment practices, when

Trump Has ‘No Symptoms,’ Returns to Downplaying Virus | Washington, D.C. News

By ZEKE MILLER, JILL COLVIN and AAMER MADHANI, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, said to be making progress in his recovery from COVID-19, expressed eagerness to return to the campaign trail Tuesday even as the outbreak that has killed more than 210,000 Americans reached ever more widely into the upper echelons of the U.S. government.

As Trump convalesced out of sight in the White House, the administration defended the protections it has put in place to protect the staff working there to treat and support him. Trump again publicly played down the virus on Twitter after his return from a three-day hospitalization.

In one significant national coronavirus action, he declared there would be no action on economic-stimulus legislation — an announcement that came not long after the Federal Reserve chairman said such help was essential for recovery with the nation reeling from the human and economic cost of the pandemic. Stocks fell on the White House news.

As for Trump’s own recovery, his doctor, Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley, said in a letter that the president had a “restful” night at the White House and “reports no symptoms.”

Meanwhile, Trump was grappling with next political steps exactly four weeks from Election Day. Anxious to project strength, Trump, who is still contagious with the virus, tweeted Tuesday morning that he was planning to attend next Thursday’s debate with Democrat Joe Biden in Miami and “It will be great!”

Elsewhere in the government, the scope of the outbreak was still being uncovered. On Tuesday, the nation’s top military leaders including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, and the vice chairman, Gen. John Hyten, were in quarantine after exposure to Adm. Charles W. Ray, the vice commandant of the Coast Guard.

It was not known how Ray contracted the virus, but he attended an event for military families at the White House on Sept. 27. The Coast Guard said in a statement that Ray felt mild symptoms over the weekend and was tested on Monday.

Trump on Monday made clear that he has little intention of abiding by best containment practices, when he removed his mask before entering the White House after his discharge from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Waiting aides were visible when he entered the Blue Room without a face covering.

Trump’s attitude alarmed infectious disease experts. And it suggested his own illness had not caused him to rethink his often-cavalier attitude toward the disease, which has also infected the first lady and more than a dozen White House aides and associates.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins said Tuesday, “When I saw him on the balcony of the White House, taking off his mask, I couldn’t help but think that he sent the wrong signal, given that he’s infected with COVID-19 and that there are many people in his immediate circle who have the virus,.”

Trump, for his part, falsely suggested that the virus was akin to the seasonal flu.

“Many people every

The Health 202: Trump returns to White House as CDC says infection possible with social distance

The CDC officially said the virus can spread through aerosols — underscoring how easily it can be transmitted. 

A CDC Web page now acknowledges sometimes people can still get infected with the virus — even when they’re at least six feet apart.

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” the updated page states. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising.

“Under these circumstances,” it says, “scientists believe that the amount of infectious smaller droplet and particles produced by the people with COVID-19 became concentrated enough to spread the virus to other people. The people who were infected were in the same space during the same time or shortly after the person with COVID-19 had left.” 

The latest guidance underscores the risks as Trump returns home – and residence staff tends to two active coronavirus patients. 

Around 6:30 p.m., the president appeared at the doors of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after a three-night stay to be treated for his own case of covid-19, clad in a suit and mask as he waved and gave a thumbs-up signal. Shortly after arriving at the White House, Trump tweeted a short video depicting himself exiting the helicopter and climbing up the stairs to pose for pictures. 

A few hours earlier, the president told Americans “dont be afraid” of covid-19:

“Trump’s comments… again downplaying the coronavirus came despite evidence that White House decisions to flout public health guidelines and engage in practices viewed as reckless have had dire consequences in the West Wing,” The Post’s Toluse Olorunnipa and Josh Dawsey write.

More than a dozen White House officials have tested positive in recent days. Trump’s doctor Sean Conley, who said Trump was “not out of the woods yet” said the medical team made “some recommendations for how to keep everything safe down at the White House.” 

“Conley declined to describe what specific steps would be made to ensure a safe environment at a building that doubles as a personal residence and a government office while the president remains contagious, which could be for several more days at least,” Toluse and Josh write. 

White House staff have abandoned the West Wing, but some are already infected.

Press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and two of her deputies reported testing positive for the virus yesterday, prompting a flurry of criticism for briefly removing her mask Sunday while briefing the press. McEnany wrote that she wasn’t in contact long enough with anyone to be considered a “close contact” by the White House Medical Unit. 

CBS News correspondent Weijia Jiang:

Other prominent figures who tested positive include former Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway and Sens. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah), all of whom attended a Rose Garden ceremony announcing the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court 10 days ago.

Trump Returns to White House, but ‘Not Out of Woods Yet’

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

President Donald Trump has returned to the White House after improving sufficiently during his hospitalization for COVID-19 to be discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, his personal physician stated during a mid-afternoon press conference.

“Though he may not be out of the woods yet, the team and I agree all of our evaluations — and most importantly his clinical status — support the president’s safe return home, where he will be surrounded by world-class medical care 24/7,” Sean P. Conley, DO, said. “There is nothing being done here that cannot be done safely at home.”



Dr Sean Conley, President Trump’s personal physician.

“You’ve seen the videos and tweets. He’s back,” Conley said.

When asked why the President was permitted to leave the hospital Sunday evening and greet supporters from his SUV wearing only a cloth mask, Conley replied that the president has been surrounded by medical and security staff wearing full PPE for days. The secret service agents that drove him “had the same level of PPE,” he added.

Infection Control Plans

Conley also reported that the team is helping to evaluate where the president will carry out his duties following discharge, including his office space. Jason Blaylock, MD, chief of medicine at Walter Reed and an infectious disease specialist at the hospital, addressed planned safety precautions.



Dr Jason Blaylock

“Both myself and Dr Wes Campbell have worked very closely with various laboratories in the area, state-of-the-art facilities…on obtaining advanced diagnostic testing to really inform the White House medical team on both the status of the president as well as his ability to transmit virus to others,” he said.

Blaylock is also helping to address infection control strategies “so he can safely return to his residence.”



Dr Sean Dooley

Sean Dooley, MD, provided a rundown of the president’s latest vital signs, including a temperature of 98.1°F, a respiratory rate of 17 breaths/minute, heart rate of 68 beats/minute, a blood pressure of 134/78 mm Hg and an oxygen saturation of 97% on room air. Trump has no respiratory complaints and is ambulatory and working, Dooley added.

Citing HIPAA privacy provisions, Conley would not release any details on the president’s lung scans. He said, “I’m not at liberty to discuss.” Likewise, Conley refused to answer questions from reporters about the timing of the President’s last negative COVID-19 test.

“I don’t want to go backwards,” he said.

Multiple Therapies Will Continue



Dr Brian Garibaldi

The President is continuing COVID-19 treatment, Brian Garibaldi, MD, told reporters. Trump took his third dose of remdesivir yesterday without difficulty, Garibaldi said, and will receive a fourth dose prior to discharge this evening. A planned fifth dose will be administered at the White House tomorrow evening.

The president is also receiving dexamethasone on an ongoing basis,  Garibaldi said.  

A reporter asked Conley why the President received treatment with a steroid that doctors typically reserve for people with more severe COVID-19. Conley replied