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Dutch Woman Becomes First Person Reported to Die After COVID-19 Reinfection

Dutch physicians have recorded the first known death due to coronavirus reinfection. 

According to a report cited by CNN, an 89-year-old woman recently died after contracting COVID-19 for the second time. The patient was said to be immunocompromised as she was also receiving treatment for a rare type of blood cell cancer called Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia; however, experts said her immune system could’ve been strong enough to fight the coronavirus infection because her cancer treatment “does not necessarily result in life threatening disease.”

Researchers at Maastricht University Medical Center said the elderly woman tested positive for the novel virus earlier this year after she began exhibiting symptoms like a fever and cough. She was reportedly hospitalized for nearly a week, and was eventually discharged once the symptoms had gone away.

About two months later, the woman began another round of chemotherapy treatment and once again started experiencing a cough, fever, and difficulty breathing. A subsequent test confirmed she had been infected with COVID-19 and no antibodies were found her blood in the following days. Researchers later found that the strains from her first and second infections differed, indicating “that the second episode was a reinfection rather than prolonged shedding.” The woman died two weeks later.

The case marks the first recorded death following a coronavirus reinfection; however, there have been a handful of confirmed reinfections across the world. On Tuesday, it was reported that a 25-year-old Nevada man was the first known American to have contracted the disease twice. Unlike the Dutch woman, the Nevada man had no known underlying health conditions, but his second infection was said to have been much worse than the first.

“It means that it is possible to get reinfected, that’s all it really tells us,” Dr. Simon Clarke, associate professor in cellular microbiology at the University of Reading, told CNBC. “It doesn’t tell us that protective immunity is impossible. It is worth remembering that this might be just one of a very small handful of reinfections, it might be very rare, or it might be one of the very first few we are going to see a lot more of given time.”

The American patient has since recovered.

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Orange County’s Latest Coronavirus Update: No Deaths Reported

ORANGE COUNTY, CA — Orange County case counts are trending back in a positive direction, according to officials who remain hopeful at reopening more schools and businesses soon. On Monday, OC Health Care Agency reported 117 newly diagnosed COVID-19 cases, raising the cumulative total to 55,892, but no deaths were reported, leaving the Orange County coronavirus death toll unchanged at 1,341.

Orange County CEO Frank Kim has said that the county wants to see daily diagnoses below 130. Monday’s case counts were welcome news after Sunday’s report of 244 cases and one death.

To reach the less-restrictive orange tier established by the state, the county needs to average closer to 130 daily cases, Kim said.

Last week, 54 deaths were reported, down from 72 the week before and 77 the week before that.

Hospitalizations inched up from 164 on Sunday to 167 on Monday, while the number of intensive care unit patients dipped from 57 to 56.

The change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients went from -4.1% to -5.8%. The county has 31% of its intensive care unit beds and 67% of its ventilators available.

The positivity rate, which is reported each Tuesday, inched up from 3.1% two weeks ago to 3.2% last week, and the daily case rate per 100,000 people rose from 4.4 to 5.2, which is higher than the cutoff of 3.9 to qualify for a move from the red to the orange tier.

Kim told CNS on Friday that the county is averaging 4.9 cases per 100,000 residents, down from a peak of 5.4 on Oct. 5.

“Our numbers are heading in the right direction,” he said.

To qualify for the orange tier, the positivity rate must be 2% to 4%, and the case rate per 100,000 must be 1% to 3.9%.

Moving to the orange tier would mean retail businesses could operate at full capacity, instead of 50% as required in the red tier. Shopping malls could also operate at full capacity, but with closed common areas and reduced food courts, just as in the red tier.

According to OCHCA data, 948,671 COVID-19 tests have been conducted, including 4,504 reported Monday. There have been 49,947 documented recoveries.

Dr. Clayton Chau, director of the OCHCA and the county’s chief health officer, said increased testing can lower the positivity rate, but it can also lead to an increase in the case rate per 100,000. The state introduced a health equity measure, which launched last Tuesday, to help counties address high case counts concentrated within certain ZIP codes that include high-density housing and language barriers, among other issues.

Orange County got a head start on that weeks ago with its Latino Health Equity program, which raised awareness of coronavirus within hotspots in Santa Ana and Anaheim, Chau said.

Positivity rates as high as 20% have fallen to single digits in some of those neighborhoods, Chau said.

There is an “accelerator” in the state’s formula that if the positivity rate makes it to the least-restrictive

Second-largest meth bust reported along southwest border

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said Sunday that it seized more than 3,000 pounds of methamphetamine in its second-biggest meth bust on the southern border.

The agency said the seizure included methamphetamine, fentanyl and heroin. The drugs were found Friday morning at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry inside a truck, the agency said.

CBP said the drugs, including 3,014 pounds of methamphetamine, 64 pounds of heroin, 39 pounds of powdered fentanyl and about 37 pounds of fentanyl pills, were concealed among medical supplies. The total value of the drugs was estimated at $7.2 million.

“Smugglers will try every way possible to try and get their product across the border and because of the partnership between CBP, Homeland Security investigations and DEA [Drug Enforcement Administration] this significant seizure occurred and we stopped them,” Anne Maricich, acting CBP director of field operations in San Diego, said in a statement.

“This massive seizure is testament of what law enforcement agencies can do when we combine forces — prevent over $7 million worth of deadly drugs from entering our country, thus saving countless lives from addiction and overdose deaths,” DEA Special Agent in Charge John W. Callery said.

The agency said it arrested the truck driver, a 47-year-old Mexican citizen, and turned him over to a joint investigative team of the Department of Homeland Security, DEA and Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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1,162 New Cases, 23 Deaths Reported Sunday

ATLANTA, GA — The Georgia Department of Public Health in Atlanta reported a total of 331,409 confirmed cases of COVID-19 at 2:50 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11. According to the health department’s website, that includes 1,162 newly confirmed cases over the last 24 hours.

Georgia also reported 7,416 deaths so far from COVID-19, with 23 more deaths recorded in the last 24 hours. In addition, the state reported 29,635 hospitalizations — 24 more than the day before — and 5,511 admissions so far to intensive-care units.

No information is available from Georgia about how many patients have recovered.

Counties in or near metro Atlanta and other metropolitan areas continue to have the highest number of positives, with Fulton County still in the lead and exceeding 29,000 cases on Sunday.

  1. Fulton County: 29,072 cases — 130 new

  2. Gwinnett County: 28,796 cases — 84 new

  3. Cobb County: 20,545 cases — 106 new

  4. DeKalb County: 19,702 cases — 89 new

  5. Hall County: 9,964 cases — 23 new

  6. Chatham County: 8,868 — 26 new

  7. Richmond County: 7,490 — 23 new

  8. Clayton County: 7,466 — 58 new

  9. Cherokee County: 6,471 — 48 new

  10. Bibb County: 6,295 — 25 new

Counties in or near metro Atlanta also continue to have the most deaths from COVID-19.

  1. Fulton County: 591 deaths — 1 new

  2. Cobb County: 442 deaths — 3 new

  3. Gwinnett County: 424 deaths — 1 new

  4. DeKalb County: 380 deaths — 2 new

  5. Dougherty County: 188 deaths

  6. Bibb County: 188 deaths — 2 new

  7. Chatham County: 175 deaths

  8. Muscogee County: 173 deaths

  9. Richmond County: 172 deaths

  10. Clayton County: 170 deaths — 2 new

All Georgia statistics are available on the state’s COVID-19 website.

Globally, more than 37 million people have tested positive for COVID-19, and more than 1 million people have died from it, Johns Hopkins University reported Sunday.

In the United States, nearly 7.7 million people have been infected and more than 214,000 people have died from COVID-19 as of Sunday. The U.S. has only about 4 percent of the world’s population but more confirmed cases and deaths than any other country.

This article originally appeared on the Loganville-Grayson Patch

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Louisiana coronavirus: 526 new cases, 5 more deaths reported Thursday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 526 more coronavirus cases and five more deaths in its daily noon update Thursday.

The number of hospitalizations increased by 12, and the number of patients in need of ventilators increased by one.

Here are a few key statewide statistics as of Thursday:

— Total cases: 170,621

— Total deaths: 5,416

— Currently hospitalized: 564

— Currently on ventilators: 79

— Presumed recovered: 157,873 as of Oct. 5 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 2,528 as of Oct. 7 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

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Potential Coronavirus Outbreak Reported At Nashua Church

NASHUA, NH — State health officials are investigating a potential COVID-19 outbreak at a Nashua church.

Seven people who attend services at the Gate City Church on Main Street in Nashua in September have contracted the virus, according to officials. Those people who became infected attended multi-day prayer sessions held between Sept. 19 and Sept. 28.

“DHHS and the Nashua Division of Public Health and Community Services are investigating these illnesses further and the church has moved to hosting virtual services only,” the State Joint Information Center said. “Any individuals who attended events associated with Gate City Church since Sept. 19 may have been exposed to COVID-19 and should observe for illness and seek testing.”

Testing is available for anyone without health insurance or a primary care provider. Tests can be scheduled by calling 603-271-5980 or through completing the online form at the state’s testing website.

Potential symptoms parishioners should be looking for include fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath, runny nose, nasal congestion, sore throat, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of taste or smell.

Any person who develops new symptoms should stay home, limit their contact with others, immediately contact their healthcare provider, and get tested for COVID-19.

Guidance for self-observation is available here.

COVID-19 continues to circulate in New Hampshire communities, according to health officials, but Granite Staters can protect themselves and help prevent further infections in our communities by:

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol if soap and water are not available.

  • Avoiding close contact with others. When outside your home, keep a distance of at least 6 feet between yourself and others. This is known as social distancing.

  • Wearing a cloth face covering that covers your mouth and nose to protect others when in public areas.

  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands.

  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Staying home if you have a fever or are not feeling well.

  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces.

For more information on COVID-19 in NH, visit https://www.nh.gov/covid19/.

Got a news tip? Send it to tony.schinella@patch.com. View videos on Tony Schinella’s YouTube channel.

This article originally appeared on the Nashua Patch

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Louisiana coronavirus: 1,052 more cases reported Wednesday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 1,052 more coronavirus cases and nine more deaths in its daily noon update Wednesday.

The number of hospitalizations declined by 15, and the number of patients in need of ventilators increased by seven.

The number of newly-reported cases includes some backlog.

“LDH is reporting 1,052 new cases, including a backlog of 406 cases with collection dates before 9/16,” the agency wrote on its dashboard.

Here are a few key statewide statistics as of Wednesday:

— Total cases: 170,097

— Total deaths: 5,411

— Currently hospitalized: 552

— Currently on ventilators: 78

— Presumed recovered: 157,873 as of October 5 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 2,538 as of October 7 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

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More COVID cases reported at schools

Local municipalities and school districts have continued to report new coronavirus cases this week.

Shenendehowa district sees its sixth case this week

The Shenendehowa school district said Thursday that two Orenda Elementary school students and a middle school staff member have tested positive for COVID-19 — marking the district’s fourth, fifth and sixth cases so far this week.

The Orenda cases are “directly related” to a Chango Elementary teacher who tested positive earlier this week and were they were contracted through outside activities, not by attending school, the district said in a notice posted to its website. Later in the evening, the district announced that a middle school staff member has also tested positive, though it did not identify to which of its three middle schools the person is connected.

The district says it’s working with the Saratoga County Public Health Department to assist with any follow-up needed through contact tracing.


Anyone identified as having prolonged, direct exposure to the students was to be contacted by the end of the day Thursday, the district said. Officials are urging area residents to add the number for the county health department — 518-885-2276 — to their contacts as it may otherwise come up as spam on some phones.

If you do not receive a call, then you have not been identified as having direct, prolonged contact with the person, the district said.

“We cannot emphasize enough that parents, students and staff members need to be just as vigilant following guidelines outside of school, this includes limiting group gatherings, practicing good hygiene, wearing masks and following social distance guidelines,” the district said in a notice posted to its website.

Two students from Shenedehowa’s High School East also tested positive for the virus this week. The first one was announced Sunday and the second on Tuesday. The district said the latter case was related to a previous case “stemming from a point of exposure in a recreational contact outside of school.”

The district said all students and staff are required to complete a daily health assessment, wear masks and socially distance while in school or on the bus. In addition, classrooms are cleaned regularly throughout the school day, and deep cleaned and sanitized at the end of each school day.

“Safety is everyone’s responsibility,” the district said. “We need to work together to keep everyone safe. Please do not send your child to school sick. If you suspect that you, your child, or someone in your family has been potentially exposed to COVID-19, please contact your personal medical provider.”

14 more people added to Albany County caseload

Albany County reported 14 new coronavirus cases Thursday.

County Executive Dan McCoy said that brings the total number of cases to 2,876 since the pandemic began. There are 93 active cases in the county and 2,783 people have recovered from the virus.

Of the new cases, eight are associated with the University at Albany, two are health care workers or live in congregate settings and three did

Louisiana coronavirus: 230 new cases, 9 more deaths reported Monday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 230 more coronavirus cases and nine more deaths in its daily noon update Monday.

The number of hospitalizations increased by 29, and the number of patients in need of ventilators increased by three.

Here are a few key statewide statistics as of Monday:

— Total cases: 168,512

— Total deaths: 5,396

— Currently hospitalized: 547

— Currently on ventilators: 71

— Presumed recovered: 154,163 as of Sept. 28 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 1,425 as of Sept. 30 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

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Serious coronavirus-related inflammatory condition among children now reported in adults: CDC

A rare but serious coronavirus-related inflammatory condition in children was also recently identified among adults, per a report released Friday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) usually involves shock, heart malfunction, stomach pain and hyperinflammation. The CDC drew on reports of 27 adult patients to describe a new, similar condition —  multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A).

RARE CORONAVIRUS-LINKED SYNDROME AFFECTS 11 CHILDREN IN WASHINGTON STATE: OFFICIALS

“These 27 patients had cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and neurologic symptoms without severe respiratory illness and concurrently received positive test results for SARS-CoV-2…,” per the report. Fortunately, the vast majority (24 of 27) of MIS-A patients survived, which was said to mirror outcomes seen in MIS-C patients treated in intensive health care settings.

There is still much unknown over MIS-A, with a deal of uncertainty over the timeline from SARS-CoV-2 infection to MIS-A onset, but the report suggests “MIS-A and MIS-C might represent postinfectious processes.” Adults who reported typical COVID-19 symptoms went on to develop MIS-A about two to five weeks later.

Patients with MIS-A may not test positive for COVID-19, given the onset of the syndrome weeks later. The agency emphasized the importance of antibody testing for previous SARS-CoV-2 infection to recognize and treat MIS-A.

Of the 27 MIS-A patients included in the report, 30% of them, along with “45% of 440 children with MIS-C reported to CDC through July 29,” tested negative for current SARS-CoV-2 infection but had positive antibody results.

There is still much unknown over MIS-A, a newly identified coronavirus-related complication in adults that had previously been reported among children. (iStock)

There is still much unknown over MIS-A, a newly identified coronavirus-related complication in adults that had previously been reported among children. (iStock)

WHAT IS DEXAMETHASONE, THE NEWEST DRUG IN TRUMP’S COVID-19 TREATMENT?

The criteria used to identify MIS-A include severe illness requiring hospitalization in patients over age 21; current or previous SARS-CoV-2 infection in the past 12 weeks; severe dysfunction of one or more organs other than the lungs; lab evidence of severe inflammation and a lack of severe respiratory illness.

Patients were mostly treated with corticosteroids among other treatments like vasopressors (to raise blood pressure) or blood thinners.

The report also noted that “all but one” of the patients in the report were among racial or ethnic minorities, adding that “MIS-C has also been reported disproportionately in these communities.” However, due to the small sample size, the CDC said more research is needed before making conclusions about the burden of MIS-A in various groups.

“Findings indicate that adult patients of all ages with current or previous SARS-CoV-2 infection can develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome resembling MIS-C,” authors wrote, adding that measures to limit COVID-19 spread may help prevent MIS-A.

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