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Dentist Fortitude Valley, Precision Dental, Offers General and Cosmetic Dentistry Solutions in a Caring and Friendly Environment in QLD – Press Release

Dentist Fortitude Valley, Precision Dental, Offers General and Cosmetic Dentistry Solutions in a Caring and Friendly Environment in QLD

Fortitude Valley, QLD – Not every dentist is the same. There are those that will only be concerned about providing treatment while there are others that will go above and beyond in ensuring that patients are feeling comfortable. Precision Dental is a modern dental practice that is based at the heart of Brisbane servicing Fortitude Valley and is committed to high-quality dental care. The practice provides both general and cosmetic dental treatment for the whole family.

“Our ultra-modern practice is conveniently located in HQ Towers which offer free onsite parking for the duration of treatment. Emergency appointments are available throughout the day and Saturday appointments can be arranged. We are equipped with the latest generation of equipment and pride ourselves in providing thorough dental treatment that is tailored to individual needs and goals.” Said Dr Billy Choi, the spokesperson for the clinic, regarding their unrivalled services.

The dental practice was founded on three key principles including honesty, patient comfort, and quality. Every member of the staff will ensure that patients are comfortable right from the moment they walk in their office. The clinic uses the latest generation of quiet equipment to ensure that dental visits are enjoyable. Some of the tools that can be found in the treatment room to make patients relax include:


Parents can rest easy knowing that the clinic offers children’s dental emergency treatments. Children have high energy and are always going to be susceptible to dental emergencies. The dentists have knowledge in dealing with such unexpected events and will ensure that children are not experiencing discomfort a minute longer. The practice applies advanced skills in dentistry and state-of-the-art equipment to overcome dental emergencies.

The clinic also aims at being the leading cosmetic dentistry treatment provider in Fortitude Valley, one smile at a time. The treatment options are tailored to meet the individual needs of the patient. A good dentist Fortitude Valley is one that will start by assessing the individual needs of the patient before coming up with a course of action and this is exactly what you get when you reach out to Precision Dental. Getting a smile makeover will help in maintaining a youthful appearance and also boosts the self-confidence of a person. Patients can enjoy all of these benefits by booking a dental appointment with Precision Dental at their own convenient time.

The clinic also believes in providing education to patients because good dental care requires a holistic approach. The clinic believes that a dentist should be a partner when it comes to the wellbeing of the teeth, gums, and mouth. Precision Dental provides patients with both basic and advanced information so that they’re establishing a consistent and reliable oral care routine. It is also easy for patients to book an appointment when they visit their website.

Precision Dental is located at S13, HQ South Tower, 520 Wickham St, Fortitude Valley, QLD 4006. For enquiries regarding the top-rated dentist Fortitude Valley and the services offered, contact their team by calling (07) 3852 1160

Summa Equity Acquires Sengenics to Advance Precision Medicine Through Proteomics

Summa Equity, the purpose-driven private equity firm that invests to solve global challenges, has acquired a majority stake in Sengenics, a functional proteomics company with a proprietary technology called KREX that enables researchers to vastly improve the understanding of the human proteome and immune system. Proteomics, i.e. the large-scale study of proteins, is one of the most important areas for gaining insights into human biology and disease, as protein expressions, structures and functions are critical in reflecting states of health.

Sengenics was first founded in 2008 and went on to commercialise the KREX technology that was originally developed from a joint collaboration between the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford. The company’s patented KREX technology enables researchers to address both the function and folding structure of proteins using one technology that allows for large numbers of proteins to be studied simultaneously, with high sensitivity and specificity. The combination of these capabilities makes KREX unique. The technology is relevant for a broad range of applications in research and throughout the value chain for drugs, vaccines and diagnostics. Sengenics is currently mainly focused on autoantibody detection for applications in autoimmune diseases, oncology and infectious diseases, including COVID-19. The company recently launched a unique high-throughput, multi-antigen, multi-domain and fully quantitative COVID-19 test, leveraging the KREX technology.

Sengenics has grown rapidly in recent years and established customer relationships with top global pharmaceutical companies, and leading research and academic institutions around the world. The company currently has commercial partnerships with 9 out of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies to co-develop complementary and companion diagnostic tests for autoimmune and cancer immunotherapy drugs. Sengenics is based in Europe and South-East Asia.

“Sengenics’ proprietary technology unlocks tremendous potential for researchers around the world to further their understanding of biology and disease,” says Tommi Unkuri, Partner at Summa Equity. “We are proud to partner with the company and support its journey, as it looks to expand its position in the market and grow its business. We look forward to supporting the Sengenics team in our shared ambition to invest to drive product development, global expansion and accelerated adoption.”

Summa Equity invests in companies that address global challenges, while managing environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors, with the aim of increasing returns and reducing risk. It was the first company to align its investments with the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The investment in Sengenics is aligned with the firm’s Changing Demographics theme and supports the SDG Target #3: “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”, by enabling improved diagnosis, treatment and patient outcomes across a number of disease areas.

“We are excited to welcome Summa Equity as a major strategic investor and shareholder in Sengenics. Their extensive capabilities and alignment with our vision of changing the future of medicine through immune-proteomics is a very strong strategic fit. Summa also has a great deal of relevant knowledge and experience to be a value-added owner for us given its ownership of Olink Proteomics. This

SEngine Precision Medicine to Present at Society of Functional Precision Medicine Virtual …

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

SEATTLE, Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — SEnginePrecision Medicine, a precision oncology company revolutionizing cancer diagnostics and drug discovery by pre-testing drugs on patient-derived tumor organoids, today announced that Chief Medical Officer Astrid L. Margossian, MD, PhD, will present at the Society for Functional Precision Medicine (SFPM) Virtual Monthly Seminar on October 14th at 11:30 am ET.

Dr. Margossian is leading SEngine’s clinical validation initiatives for the PARIS® Test, a CLIA certified cancer organoid based drug sensitivity test for all solid tumors. The presentation is entitled, “Predictive Clinical Value of a CLIA-Approved Organoid Based Drug Sensitivity Test,” and will highlight the data on the PARIS® Test, recently presented at the ASCO 2020 and ACCR 2020 annual meetings, inclusive of organoids sensitivity results, showing clinical correlation with genomics and previous clinical treatments. Registration for the live event is available for free at https://www.sfpm.io/seminars.php.

SFPM’s virtual monthly seminar brings together distinguished guest speakers and through interactive panel discussions and Q&A sessions focuses on these key topics:

  • Demonstrating the clinical utility of functional precision medicine testing
  • Implementing functional testing in precision medicine clinical trials
  • Accelerating the application of functional testing
  • Addressing stakeholder, educational and investment challenges for functional precision medicine

About PARIS® Test
The CLIA certified PARIS® Test is based on the capability to propagate patient-specific cancer tissue as organoids ex vivo and is applicable to all solid tumors including colon, breast, lung, ovarian and pancreatic cancer. Organoids are cancer-derived cells grown in 3D outside the body, which maintain the functionality of the original tumor as well as its genomic characteristics. For cancers where the path is not clear, such as many metastatic and recurrent cancers, the PARIS test provides crucial information to the treating physicians to match the right drug to the right patient.

About SEngine Precision Medicine
SEngine Precision Medicine Inc. is a precision oncology company revolutionizing cancer diagnostics and therapies by pre-testing drugs on patient-derived organoids grown ex-vivo utilizing patient specific tumor cells. As a spin-out from the world-renowned Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, SEngine is leveraging over two decades of R&D in diagnostics and drug discovery. The Company is commercializing the PARIS® Test, a next generation diagnostic test that predicts drug responses integrating knowledge of cancer genomics with organoids, robotics, and AI-driven computational tools. SEngine’s CLIA certified PARIS® Test generates predictive drug sensitivity reports for patients with solid tumors. SEngine is also pursuing drug discovery via strategic collaborations with biopharmaceutical / pharma companies leveraging its precision oncology platform.

Discover more at SengineMedicine.com and follow the latest news from SEngine on Twitter at @SEngineMedicine and on LinkedIn.

Contact:
Stephanie Carrington
[email protected]
646-277-1282

Source Article

Scientists develop new precision medicine approach for pancreatic cancer

Scientists from the University of Glasgow are developing new ways to predict who will respond to drugs targeting damaged DNA in pancreatic cancer. 

Publishing their findings in Gastroenterology, the team used cells grown in the lab (cell lines) and mini replicas of patients’ tumours (organoids) to identify molecular markers that can predict which tumours will respond to a number of drugs that target damaged DNA.  

Dr David Chang, from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Cancer Sciences, called the results “a huge breakthrough in terms of what might be possible for future treatments.”

The team are now taking their strategy forward into a clinical trial to help doctors work out who might respond to the drugs, either alone or in combination. The trial – PRIMUS-004 – is part of our Precision Panc platform for pancreatic cancer, which aims to increase opportunities for people with pancreatic cancer to join clinical trials and to develop new treatment strategies. 

“The strategy we’ve developed is extremely promising, and we’re very pleased and proud to see it now be taken into clinical trial.” – Dr David Chang

Precision Panc

In 2017, we invested £10 million in Precision Panc to speed up our understanding of pancreatic and work towards more tailored treatment for the disease. It’s our biggest standalone in pancreatic cancer research to date, with the aim of driving progress for pancreatic cancer, where survival has remained stubbornly low.

A major barrier to treating pancreatic effectively is that there are very few treatment options. But there are some pancreatic cancers that cannot repair damaged DNA, which make them vulnerable to some new treatments. This is what researchers are aiming to target.

“We urgently need new ways to treatment pancreatic cancer,” says Michelle Mitchell, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive. “The Precision Panc study offers a dynamic way to explore new tailored treatments, and it’s fantastic that we know have new drug candidates to add to the PRIMUS-004 trials.”

A menu of trials

PRIMUS-004 is a mid-stage (phase 2) clinical trial testing the new approach to help match people with pancreatic that’s spread to new targeted treatments.

The trial is due to open this month and will be an option for people who’ve already had platinum chemotherapy and whose cancer has a fault that means it cannot repair damaged DNA. Funded by AstraZeneca and endorsed by Cancer Research UK, it’s the first trial in the UK that will test this precision medicine approach in pancreatic cancer. 

PRIMUS-004 is the fourth trial that Precision Panc will feed into, with 3 studies already linked to the platform – PRIMUS-001 for people with pancreatic cancer that’s spread and PRIMUS-002, which is testing the benefits of 2 different chemotherapy combos before surgery. 

Another trial – PRIMUS-005, involving patients with locally advanced cancer – is also due to open this month. 

As well as helping to give people with pancreatic cancer better trial options, the Precision Panc study is also collecting and analysing tumour samples and looking for new biomarkers to

Scientists develop new ‘precision medicine’ approach to treating damaged DNA in pancreatic cancer

dna
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Scientists have developed a new “precision medicine” approach to treating the damaged DNA in the cancer cells of Pancreatic Cancer patients.

The findings mark an important step forward for potential treatment options for pancreatic cancer, improving the options and outcomes for a disease where survival rates have remained stubbornly low.

The study detailing the approach—led by the University of Glasgow and published in Gastroenterology—used cell lines and organoids that were generated from patients with pancreatic cancer to develop new molecular markers that can predict who will respond to drugs targeting DNA damage.

The researchers tested these markers using multiple drugs, and have developed a strategy that are now being taken forward into clinical trial. The trial will help doctors and researchers predict which patient will respond to which one of these drugs, either alone or in combination.

Funding for the trail has come from AstraZeneca and will now be included in the PRIMUS-004 clinical trial as part of the Precision-Panc therapeutic development platform for pancreatic cancer.

PRIMUS-004 is a ground-breaking pancreatic cancer trial, which aims to match patients with more targeted and effective treatment for their tumors. Run by Precision-Panc, a flagship therapeutic development program dedicated to pancreatic cancer—led by the University of Glasgow with major funding from Cancer Research UK—the trial brings a precision medicine approach to pancreatic cancer treatment for the first time in the UK.

The trial will open for recruitment in Glasgow shortly, with 20 other centers throughout the UK to follow.

Although survival for many types of cancer has improved, pancreatic cancer survival has lagged significantly behind in the last 40 years. The disease is particularly hard to treat, partly because it’s often diagnosed at a late stage.

A major limitation to treating pancreatic cancer effectively is that there are very few treatment options for patients with the disease. Currently, some patients with pancreatic cancer cannot repair damaged DNA in the cancer cells, which makes the cancer vulnerable to some new and established drug treatments.

Dr. David Chang, from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Cancer Sciences, said: “Our study is a huge breakthrough in terms of what might be possible with future treatments. As part of our research, the strategy we’ve developed is extremely promising, and we’re very pleased and proud to see it now be taken into clinical trial. For us, this is a demonstration of a bench-to-bedside precision oncology approach to tackle this terrible disease.”

Michelle Mitchell, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive, said: “We urgently need new ways to treat pancreatic cancer. The disease only has a few treatment options and is generally diagnosed at a late stage, so survival has remained stubbornly low. The Precision Panc study offers a dynamic way to explore new tailored treatments, and it’s fantastic that we now have new drug candidates to add to the PRIMUS-004 trial. We look forward to seeing if these drugs, which have shown promise in the lab, have the same impact for people with pancreatic cancer.”

Progenity to Present Precision Medicine Abstracts at American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) …

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

October 9, 2020 GMT

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Progenity, Inc. (Nasdaq: PROG), a biotechnology company with an established track record of success in developing and commercializing molecular testing products, is pleased to announce that two abstracts related to Progenity’s ingestible technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders have been accepted for presentation at American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) virtual annual meeting set to take place October 23-28, 2020. Progenity will be presenting one oral presentation and one poster presentation.

The accepted abstract titles and study findings will be a part of the event’s on-demand sessions and virtual e-poster hall, which are embargoed until October 26 at 8:00 a.m., EST, to coincide with the start of the ACG 2020 Virtual Annual Scientific Meeting. More information about these abstracts will be made available on the Progenity website following the conference.

About Progenity
Progenity, Inc. is a biotechnology company with an established track record of success in developing and commercializing molecular testing products, as well as innovating in the field of precision medicine. Progenity provides in vitro molecular tests designed to improve lives by providing actionable information that helps guide patients and physicians in making medical decisions during key life stages. The company applies a multi-omics approach, combining genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to its molecular testing products and to the development of a suite of investigational ingestible devices designed to provide precise diagnostic sampling and drug delivery solutions. Progenity’s vision is to transform healthcare to become more precise and personal by improving diagnoses of disease and improving patient outcomes through localized treatment with targeted therapies. For additional information about Progenity, please visit the company’s website at  www.progenity.com.

Investor Contact:
Robert Uhl
Managing Director, Westwicke ICR
[email protected]
(619) 228-5886

Media Contact:
Kate Blom-Lowery
CG Life
[email protected]
(619)743-7294

Source Article

How Precision Medicine Can Unravel How We Treat COVID

By Colin Allen and David Feingold, The Conversation

Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson, were among the earliest celebrities to catch the novel coronavirus. In an interview at the beginning of July, Hanks described how differently COVID-19 had affected each of them in March.

“My wife lost her sense of taste and smell, she had severe nausea, she had a much higher fever than I did. I just had crippling body aches,” he said. “I was very fatigued all the time and I couldn’t concentrate on anything for more than about 12 minutes.”

Why does COVID-19 present such different symptoms—or none at all—in different people?

Pre-existing conditions can only be part of the story. Hanks is over 60 and is a Type 2 diabetic, putting him in a high-risk group. Nevertheless, he survived his brush with the virus with no pneumonia and apparently without any long-lasting effects. Knowing what causes variation in different patients could help physicians tailor their treatments to individual patients—an approach known as precision medicine.

In recent years, a gene-centric approach to precision medicine has been promoted as the future of medicine. It underlies the massive effort funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to collect over a million DNA samples under the “All of Us” initiative that began in 2015.

But the imagined future did not include COVID-19. In the rush to find a COVID-19 vaccine and effective therapies, precision medicine has been insignificant. Why is this? And what are its potential contributions?

We are a physician geneticist and a philosopher of science who began a discussion about the promise and potential pitfalls of precision medicine before the arrival of COVID-19. If precision medicine is the future of medicine, then its application to pandemics generally, and COVID-19 in particular, may yet prove to be highly significant. But its role so far has been limited. Precision medicine must consider more than just genetics. It requires an integrative “omic” approach that must collect information from multiple sources—beyond just genes—and at scales ranging from molecules to society.

Inherited diseases such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease follow a predictable pattern. But such direct genetic causes are perhaps the exception rather than the rule when it comes to health outcomes. Some heritable conditions—for instance, psoriasis or the many forms of cancer—depend on complex combinations of genes, environmental and social factors whose individual contributions to the disease are difficult to isolate. At best, the presence of certain genes constitutes a risk factor in a population but does not fully determine the outcome for an individual person carrying those genes.

The situation becomes yet more complicated for infectious diseases.

Viruses and bacteria have their own genomes that interact in complex ways with the cells in the people they infect. The genome of SARS-CoV-2 underlying COVID-19 has been extensively sequenced. Its mutations are identified and traced worldwide, helping epidemiologists understand the spread of the virus. However, the interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human DNA, and the effect on people of

Precision medicine uses multiomic details to battle kidney disease

September 10, 2020

6 min read


Source/Disclosures



Disclosures:
Bansal, Eadon, Jones-Smith, Kiryluk, and Sharma report no relevant financial disclosures.

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The value of precision medicine has been shown with the identification of the genetic causes of tumors that differ among patients. Applied to nephrology, precision medicine can offer an earlier look at the potential risk for kidney disease.

“Precision medicine is a personalized approach to disease management of the patient … The goal is to have the right dose, delivered at the right time, for the right patient,” according to Shweta Bansal, MD, an associate professor of nephrology at the University of Texas-San Antonio School of Medicine. “It is not about one approach that fits all patients. It must be tailored.”

The treatment regimen is the last step in precision medicine, Bansal said. The work begins with the detection of the origins of disease through genomics.

“[NIH director] Francis Collins said it most straightforward. Precision medicine is the application of prevention and treatment strategies that take individual variability into account,” Michael Eadon, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the divisions of nephrology and clinical pharmacology at Indiana University School of Medicine, told Nephrology News & Issues. “There has always been an overarching connotation that genomic information, either from your genome or downstream applications like gene expression, would be integrated into evidence-based medicine.”

Kumar Sharma, MD, chief of nephrology and professor of medicine at the University of Texas-San Antonio, said research at the Center for Renal Precision Medicine will reveal the likelihood of chronic kidney disease early in high-risk individuals.

Source: Center for Renal Precision Medicine.

Genomic testing

Two examples of the application of genomics to detect the risk of end-stage kidney disease is research on the efficacy of the drug tolvaptan for patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and the identification of risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) gene that can lead to kidney disease.

In a study in Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, David J. Friedman, MD, and colleagues wrote that many types of severe kidney disease are higher in Black patients than in other patient groups. That disparity is attributed to genetic variants in the apoL1 (APOL1) gene found only in individuals with recent African ancestry, the authors wrote. “These variants greatly increase rates of hypertension-associated ESKD, [focal segmental glomerulosclerosis] FSGS, HIV-associated nephropathy, and other forms of nondiabetic kidney disease.”

Friedman and colleagues said the discovery of the APOL1 risk variants has led to discussions about incorporating genetic testing in the screening process for living kidney donors. Those with the APOL1 genomic makeup could pass

Global Precision Medicine Market 2020-2030: Focus on Ecosystem, Technology, Application, and Competitive Landscape

The “Global Precision Medicine Market: Focus on Ecosystem, Technology, Application, Country Data (21 Countries), and Competitive Landscape – Analysis and Forecast, 2020-2030” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Global Precision Medicine Market to Reach $278.61 Billion by 2030

Precision medicine refers to the medicine developed as per an individual’s genetic profile. It provides guidance regarding the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. The segmentation of the population is done depending on the genome structure of the individuals and their compatibility with a specific drug molecule.

In the precision medicine market, the application of molecular biology is to study the cause of a patient’s disease at the molecular level, so that target-based therapies or individualized therapies can be applied to cure the patient’s health-related problems.

This industry is gaining traction due to the increasing awareness about healthcare among individuals, integration of smart devices such as smartphones and tablets into healthcare, and increasing collaborations and agreements of IT firms with the diagnostics and biopharmaceutical companies for the development of precision diagnostic tools.

Within the research report, the market is segmented on the basis of product type, ecosystem application, and region, which highlight value propositions and business models useful for industry leaders and stakeholders. The research also comprises country-level analysis, go-to-market strategies of leading players, future opportunities, among others, to detail the scope and provide 360-degree coverage of the domain.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Product Definition

2 Research Scope

3 Research Methodology

4 Global Precision Medicine Market Overview

4.1 Market Definition

4.2 Precision Medicine: A Frontier in the Genesis of Patient-centric Medicine

4.3 Precision Medicine: Remodeling the One-Size-Fits-All Theory to Individually Tailored Therapy

4.4 Initiatives and Programs

4.5 Precision Medicine: Enabling Technologies and Applications

4.5.1 Innovators

4.5.1.1 3D DNA Printing

4.5.1.1.1 Introduction

4.5.1.1.2 Role of 3D DNA Printing

4.5.1.2 RNA-Seq

4.5.1.2.1 Introduction

4.5.1.2.2 Role of RNA-Seq in Precision Medicine

4.5.1.2.3 Key Players

4.5.1.3 4D Molecular Imaging

4.5.1.3.1 Introduction

4.5.1.3.2 Role of 4D Molecular Imaging in Precision Medicine

4.5.1.3.3 Key Players

4.5.2 Early Adopters

4.5.2.1 CRISPR

4.5.2.1.1 Introduction

4.5.2.1.2 Role of CRISPR in Precision Medicine

4.5.2.1.3 Key Players

4.5.2.2 Blockchain

4.5.2.3 Imaging Informatics

4.5.3 Early Majority

4.5.3.1 Artificial Intelligence (AI)

4.5.3.2 Circulating Free DNA (cfDNA)

4.5.3.3 Big Data

4.5.3.4 Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)

4.5.3.5 Health Informatics

4.5.3.6 Bioinformatics

4.5.4 Late Majority

4.5.4.1 Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR)

4.5.4.2 Microarray

4.6 COVID-19 Impact on the Global Precision Medicine Market

5 Market Dynamics

5.1 Overview

5.2 Market Drivers

5.2.1 Advancement of Sequencing Technologies

5.2.2 Rising Prevalence of Chronic Diseases

5.2.3 Growing Demand for Preventive Care

5.2.4 Shifting the Significance in Medicine, from Reaction to Prevention

5.2.5 Reducing Adverse Drug Reactions Through Pharmacogenomics Test

5.2.6 Potential to Reduce the Overall Healthcare Cost Across the Globe

5.3 Market Restraints

5.3.1 Unified Framework for Data Integration

5.3.2 Limited Knowledge about Molecular Mechanism/ Interaction

5.3.3 Lack of Robust Reimbursement Landscape

5.3.4 Regulatory Hurdles

5.4 Market Opportunities

5.4.1 Targeted Gene Therapy

5.4.2 Expansion into the Emerging Markets

5.4.3 Collaboration and Partnerships Across Value Chain to Accelerate the Market Entry

6 Industry Insights

Global Precision Medicine Market 2020-2030: Remodeling the One-Size-Fits-All Theory to Individually Tailored Therapy

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dublin, Sep 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE via COMTEX) —
Dublin, Sept. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Global Precision Medicine Market: Focus on Ecosystem, Technology, Application, Country Data (21 Countries), and Competitive Landscape – Analysis and Forecast, 2020-2030” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Global Precision Medicine Market to Reach $278.61 Billion by 2030

Precision medicine refers to the medicine developed as per an individual’s genetic profile. It provides guidance regarding the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. The segmentation of the population is done depending on the genome structure of the individuals and their compatibility with a specific drug molecule.

In the precision medicine market, the application of molecular biology is to study the cause of a patient’s disease at the molecular level, so that target-based therapies or individualized therapies can be applied to cure the patient’s health-related problems.

This industry is gaining traction due to the increasing awareness about healthcare among individuals, integration of smart devices such as smartphones and tablets into healthcare, and increasing collaborations and agreements of IT firms with the diagnostics and biopharmaceutical companies for the development of precision diagnostic tools.

Within the research report, the market is segmented on the basis of product type, ecosystem application, and region, which highlight value propositions and business models useful for industry leaders and stakeholders. The research also comprises country-level analysis, go-to-market strategies of leading players, future opportunities, among others, to detail the scope and provide 360-degree coverage of the domain.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Product Definition

2 Research Scope

3 Research Methodology

4 Global Precision Medicine Market Overview
4.1 Market Definition
4.2 Precision Medicine: A Frontier in the Genesis of Patient-centric Medicine
4.3 Precision Medicine: Remodeling the One-Size-Fits-All Theory to Individually Tailored Therapy
4.4 Initiatives and Programs
4.5 Precision Medicine: Enabling Technologies and Applications
4.5.1 Innovators
4.5.1.1 3D DNA Printing
4.5.1.1.1 Introduction
4.5.1.1.2 Role of 3D DNA Printing
4.5.1.2 RNA-Seq
4.5.1.2.1 Introduction
4.5.1.2.2 Role of RNA-Seq in Precision Medicine
4.5.1.2.3 Key Players
4.5.1.3 4D Molecular Imaging
4.5.1.3.1 Introduction
4.5.1.3.2 Role of 4D Molecular Imaging in Precision Medicine
4.5.1.3.3 Key Players
4.5.2 Early Adopters
4.5.2.1 CRISPR
4.5.2.1.1 Introduction
4.5.2.1.2 Role of CRISPR in Precision Medicine
4.5.2.1.3 Key Players
4.5.2.2 Blockchain
4.5.2.3 Imaging Informatics
4.5.3 Early Majority
4.5.3.1 Artificial Intelligence (AI)
4.5.3.2 Circulating Free DNA (cfDNA)
4.5.3.3 Big Data
4.5.3.4 Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)
4.5.3.5 Health Informatics
4.5.3.6 Bioinformatics
4.5.4 Late Majority
4.5.4.1 Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR)
4.5.4.2 Microarray
4.6 COVID-19 Impact on the Global Precision Medicine Market

5 Market Dynamics
5.1 Overview
5.2 Market Drivers
5.2.1 Advancement of Sequencing Technologies
5.2.2 Rising Prevalence of Chronic Diseases
5.2.3 Growing Demand for Preventive Care
5.2.4 Shifting the Significance in Medicine, from Reaction to Prevention
5.2.5 Reducing Adverse Drug Reactions Through Pharmacogenomics Test
5.2.6 Potential to Reduce the Overall Healthcare Cost Across the Globe
5.3 Market Restraints
5.3.1 Unified Framework for Data Integration
5.3.2 Limited Knowledge about Molecular Mechanism/ Interaction
5.3.3 Lack of Robust Reimbursement Landscape
5.3.4 Regulatory