Showing: 1 - 7 of 7 RESULTS

Dutch Woman Becomes First Person Reported to Die After COVID-19 Reinfection

Dutch physicians have recorded the first known death due to coronavirus reinfection. 

According to a report cited by CNN, an 89-year-old woman recently died after contracting COVID-19 for the second time. The patient was said to be immunocompromised as she was also receiving treatment for a rare type of blood cell cancer called Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia; however, experts said her immune system could’ve been strong enough to fight the coronavirus infection because her cancer treatment “does not necessarily result in life threatening disease.”

Researchers at Maastricht University Medical Center said the elderly woman tested positive for the novel virus earlier this year after she began exhibiting symptoms like a fever and cough. She was reportedly hospitalized for nearly a week, and was eventually discharged once the symptoms had gone away.

About two months later, the woman began another round of chemotherapy treatment and once again started experiencing a cough, fever, and difficulty breathing. A subsequent test confirmed she had been infected with COVID-19 and no antibodies were found her blood in the following days. Researchers later found that the strains from her first and second infections differed, indicating “that the second episode was a reinfection rather than prolonged shedding.” The woman died two weeks later.

The case marks the first recorded death following a coronavirus reinfection; however, there have been a handful of confirmed reinfections across the world. On Tuesday, it was reported that a 25-year-old Nevada man was the first known American to have contracted the disease twice. Unlike the Dutch woman, the Nevada man had no known underlying health conditions, but his second infection was said to have been much worse than the first.

“It means that it is possible to get reinfected, that’s all it really tells us,” Dr. Simon Clarke, associate professor in cellular microbiology at the University of Reading, told CNBC. “It doesn’t tell us that protective immunity is impossible. It is worth remembering that this might be just one of a very small handful of reinfections, it might be very rare, or it might be one of the very first few we are going to see a lot more of given time.”

The American patient has since recovered.

Related Articles

More Complex

Sign up for the Complex Newsletter for breaking news, events, and unique stories.

Follow Complex on: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, TikTok

Source Article

Dutch woman becomes first person to die after being reinfected with coronavirus

DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS - 2020/06/29: A patient bed ridden after a surgery at the care unit. Amid relaxation of the coronavirus crisis, operations in the hybrid operating room under the shunt intensive care unit have fully resumed at Albert Schweitzer Hospital normal care. (Photo by Robin Utrecht/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
A patient in a hospital in Dordrecht in the Netherlands. (Getty)

A woman in the Netherlands has become the first person to die after being reinfected with coronavirus.

The elderly patient was the subject of an academic paper recently published by the Oxford University Press which said that the woman died 59 days after the start of her first bout of the virus.

The 89-year-old reportedly also suffered from a rare bone marrow type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and was diagnosed with coronavirus for a second time just two days after beginning chemotherapy.

Researchers tested her during both episodes and confirmed that the genetic makeup of the virus was different, making it likely that the woman was indeed suffering from reinfection.

DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS - 2020/06/29: A health worker gets prepared at the isolation ward of Albert Schweitzer Hospital where the last four coronavirus patients are located. (Photo by Robin Utrecht/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
The woman was discharged from hospital after her first brush with coronavirus. (Getty)

They also noted that her symptoms appeared to have “subsided entirely” when she was discharged from hospital after first being infected with coronavirus.

Lead researcher Mark Pandori, from the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory in the US, said: “While more research is needed, the possibility of reinfections could have significant implications for our understanding of COVID-19 immunity, especially in the absence of an effective vaccine.

Read more: Covid-19 reinfection casts doubt on virus immunity: study

“It also strongly suggests that individuals who have tested positive for Sars-CoV-2 should continue to take serious precautions when it comes to the virus, including social distancing, wearing face masks, and handwashing.”

There have only been 23 cases of reinfection worldwide so far according to the researchers, and in all previous cases the patients have made a full recovery.

The first recorded reinfection was a 33-year-old Hong Kong national in August whose second infection was reportedly asymptomatic.

Experts believed that since the second infection was less severe there appeared to be some “immunological memory”.

Prior to the Dutch case, however, a 25-year-old man in Nevada caught the virus twice with the second case being more severe than the first.

The man needed hospital treatment after his lungs could not get enough oxygen into his body, but he has since recovered.

Coronavirus: what happened today
Click here to sign up to the latest news and information with our daily Catch-up newsletter

Source Article

Trump campaign says president plans to participate in next debate in person despite uncertainty

President TrumpDonald John TrumpState Department revokes visa of Giuliani-linked Ukrainian ally: report White House Gift Shop selling ‘Trump Defeats COVID’ commemorative coin Biden says he should not have called Trump a clown in first debate MORE plans to participate in next week’s debate in person, his campaign said Tuesday, despite uncertainty around how he will recover from COVID-19.

“The President intends to participate in the debate in person,” the campaign’s communications director, Tim Murtaugh, said in a statement to The Hill.

But it’s unclear if the president will be healthy enough to attend the debate, or whether he would be exposing other attendees to a contagious virus that has killed roughly 210,000 people in the U.S. to date.

Trump himself signaled earlier in the day that he would take part in the debate, though he did not specify whether he might do so virtually.

“I am looking forward to the debate on the evening of Thursday, October 15th in Miami. It will be great!” Trump tweeted.

Trump first revealed that he tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday morning, and he has had symptoms since at least then. But the White House has refused to say when Trump last tested negative or fill in the timeline around his diagnosis.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines state that adults with mild to moderate COVID-19 can be around others 10 days after symptoms first appeared so long as they have gone 24 hours without a fever and other symptoms are improving.

The debate is scheduled to take place on Oct. 15, which would be 13 days from when Trump first revealed his diagnosis.

The president was on oxygen as recently as last Saturday, but he was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening after doctors said his vitals had improved and he passed clinical evaluations. But they acknowledged he is not out of the woods yet, citing next Monday as the point at which they will breathe a sigh of relief.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenState Department revokes visa of Giuliani-linked Ukrainian ally: report Biden says he should not have called Trump a clown in first debate Biden inquired about calling Trump after coronavirus diagnosis MORE has said he would take part in next week’s town hall-style debate if medical experts deem it safe.

“If the scientists say that it’s safe, that the distances are safe, then I think that’s fine,” Biden said Monday. “I’ll do whatever the experts say is appropriate thing to do.”

Source Article

Timothy Ray Brown, 1st person cured of HIV, dies after cancer relapse

Timothy Ray Brown, famous for being the first person to be cured of HIV, has died from cancer at age 54.

Known as the “Berlin patient,” Brown was diagnosed with both HIV and acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells, while living in Berlin more than a decade ago, according to Reuters. After his cancer diagnosis in 2006, Brown received radiation therapy and a bone marrow transplant in 2007; the goal of the treatment was to kill the existing cancer in his body and jumpstart production of healthy white blood cells, which are generated in the bone marrow. 

But the physician who led the procedure, Dr. Gero Huetter, aimed to treat both Brown’s leukemia and his HIV using the same operation, according to The Associated Press

Related: 7 revolutionary Nobel Prizes in medicine

Huetter sought out a bone marrow donor with a rare genetic mutation that provides natural resistance against HIV infection. The virus normally targets white blood cells called CD4-T cells, which it infiltrates through a specific receptor on the cells’ surfaces; people with the genetic mutation have an altered version of this receptor, so the virus can’t slip inside, Live Science previously reported.

After his initial bone marrow transplant in 2007, Brown was cleared of HIV and remained free of the virus until his death, The Associated Press reported. He required a second transplant in 2008 to eliminate his leukemia, but after years in remission, the cancer returned last year and spread to his spine and brain, Reuters reported.

“I’m heartbroken that my hero is now gone. Tim was truly the sweetest person in the world,” Brown’s partner Tim Hoeffgen wrote in a Facebook post, according to Reuters.

“We owe Timothy and his doctor, Gero Huetter, a great deal of gratitude for opening the door for scientists to explore the concept that a cure for HIV is possible,” Adeeba Kamarulzaman, president of the International AIDS Society, told Reuters.

Originally published on Live Science. 

Source Article

First Person Known to Be Cured of HIV, Timothy Ray Brown, Dies of Cancer at 54

T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Timothy Ray Brown in 2012

Timothy Ray Brown, the first patient known to have been cured of an HIV infection, has died from cancer.

Brown, 54, died at home in Palm Springs, California, his partner Tim Hoeffgen said, according to the Associated Press. Widely known as “the Berlin patient,” Brown had leukemia and underwent two risky bone marrow transplants in Berlin in 2007 and 2008, which rid him of the cancer and of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

The International AIDS Society confirmed the news, stating that Brown’s cancer reoccured, though his HIV remained gone.

“On behalf of all its members and the Governing Council, the IAS sends its condolences to Timothy’s partner, Tim, and his family and friends,” Adeeba Kamarulzaman, president of the IAS and professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the University of Malaya, said in a statement.

“We owe Timothy and his doctor, Gero Hütter, a great deal of gratitude for opening the door for scientists to explore the concept that a cure for HIV is possible.”

Hütter, the German hemotologist who treated Brown, said “it’s a very sad situation” that Brown’s cancer resurfaced, according to the AP, adding that “Timothy symbolized that it is possible, under special circumstances” to cure HIV.

RELATED: The AIDS Quilt Comes Home: The Inside Story of a Memorial Sewn to Show America ‘People Were Dying’

Manuel Valdes/AP/Shutterstock Timothy Ray Brown in March 2019

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE’s free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories

According to the IAS, Brown stopped antiretroviral therapy (ART) shortly after the bone marrow transplant in 2008, but “remained free of any detectable virus.”

“In other words, he was cured,” said IAS. “His experience suggested that HIV might one day be curable. This fueled a range of efforts by researchers and institutions focusing on HIV cure research.”

Sharon Lewin, president-elect of the IAS and director of the Doherty Institute in Melbourne, Australia, said Brown was “a champion and advocate for keeping an HIV cure on the political and scientific agenda.”

“It is the hope of the scientific community that one day we can honor his legacy with a safe, cost-effective and widely accessible strategy to achieve HIV remission and cure using gene editing or techniques that boost immune control,” said Lewin in a statement.

In an interview with the Associated Press last week, Brown revealed that his cancer returned last year and that he was terminally ill, receiving hospice care. “I’m still glad that I had it,” he told the outlet of the transplant. “It opened up doors that weren’t there before”

His partner Hoeffgen added last week: “He’s been like an ambassador of hope.”

Source Article

Timothy Ray Brown, 1st Person Cured of HIV, Dies of Cancer | Health News

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

Timothy Ray Brown, who made history as “the Berlin patient,” the first person known to be cured of HIV infection, has died. He was 54.

Brown died Tuesday at his home in Palm Springs, California, according to a social media post by his partner, Tim Hoeffgen. The cause was a return of the cancer that originally prompted the unusual bone marrow and stem cell transplants Brown received in 2007 and 2008, which for years seemed to have eliminated both his leukemia and HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

“Timothy symbolized that it is possible, under special circumstances,” to rid a patient of HIV — something that many scientists had doubted could be done, said Dr. Gero Huetter, the Berlin physician who led Brown’s historic treatment.

“It’s a very sad situation” that cancer returned and took his life, because he still seemed free of HIV, said Huetter, who is now medical director of a stem cell company in Dresden, Germany.

The International AIDS Society, which had Brown speak at an AIDS conference after his successful treatment, issued a statement mourning his death and said he and Huetter are owed “a great deal of gratitude” for promoting research on a cure.

Brown was working in Berlin as a translator when he was diagnosed with HIV and then later, leukemia. Transplants are known to be an effective treatment for the blood cancer, but Huetter wanted to try to cure the HIV infection as well by using a donor with a rare gene mutation that gives natural resistance to the AIDS virus.

Brown’s first transplant in 2007 was only partly successful: His HIV seemed to be gone but his leukemia was not. He had a second transplant from the same donor in 2008 and that one seemed to work.

But his cancer returned last year, Brown said in a recent interview with The Associated Press.

“I’m still glad that I had it,” he said of his transplant.

“It opened up doors that weren’t there before” and inspired scientists to work harder to find a cure, Brown said.

A second man, Adam Castillejo — called “the London patient” until he revealed his identity earlier this year — also is believed to have been cured by a transplant similar to Brown’s in 2016.

Because such donors are rare and transplants are medically risky, researchers have been testing gene therapy and other ways to try to get a similar effect. At an AIDS conference in July, researchers said they may have achieved a long-term remission in a Brazil man by using a powerful combination of drugs meant to flush dormant HIV from his body.

Mark King, a Baltimore man who writes a blog, said Brown “was just this magnet for people living with HIV, like me,” and embodied the hope for a cure.

“He has said from the beginning, ‘I don’t want to be the only one. They have to keep working on this,’” King said.

Copyright 2020 The Associated

Affected person And Dentist Chair Positions In Dentistry

Everybody wants white tooth, and they don’t wish to spend the cash for costly dental whitening processes. In the states sufferers don’t have this benefit and must depend on Insurance or other means to acquire straighter teeth. The acheivment of common healthcare wouldn’t qualify as making us a socialist society, it would merely imply that we have achieved equal entry to medical care.

Let’s attempt to do not forget that the group that ranked these healthcare packages belongs to NATO. Good dentists rapidly entice constructive phrase of mouth, so take note of what others are saying about their dentists in Derby. What most people don’t realize is that dental insurance coverage just isn’t supplied to individuals or families.

Yow will discover a veterinary dentist near you by visiting the American Veterinary Dental School web site. Normally, dental sufferers go to the clinic when in a number of ache and it is therefore important that they are attended in the most skilled method and in the shortest period of time doable.

The selection of the patient position varies with the operator, sort of procedure,area of mouth involved. If the tooth is just slightly stained with black or white spots, the dentist would opt to scrub it totally with a dental hand-piece after which fill up the cavity with a very gentle and pliable filling materials.

Would you like to have those decisions made for you by a for-profit healthcare insurance corporation whose principal concern is being profitable? Quickly no one, besides workers of Goldman Sachs or the federal government will be capable to afford health care insurance.…