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Michigan Reports 1,237 New Coronavirus Cases, 30 Deaths Tuesday

MICHIGAN — Michigan is closing in on 7,000 coronavirus deaths, according to the most recent data released by state health officials.

Michigan reported 1,237 new cases of the coronavirus on Tuesday, bringing the total number of reported cases in the state to 137,702. The state also reported 30 more deaths attributed to the coronavirus, 10 of which were identified through a vital records search, the state said. Tuesday’s increase in COVID-19 deaths brought the statewide death total to 6,928.

Michigan has added more than 1,800 new COVID-19 cases since Saturday, officials said Monday. On Saturday, the state reported that more than 104,000 people Michiganders had recovered from the coronavirus.

Don’t miss important updates from health and government officials on the impact of the coronavirus in Michigan. Sign up for Patch’s daily newsletters and email alerts.

Michigan is 18th in the U.S. in reported cases of the coronavirus, according to the World Health Organization. The state ranks 10th in the nation in COVID-19 deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, more than 8 million cases of the coronavirus have been reported in the U.S. More than 220,000 people in the U.S. have died from the virus in the U.S., while over 5.2 million COVID-19 recoveries have been reported in the U.S.

Over 38.2 million cases of the coronavirus have been reported worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. That number includes more than 1 million COVID-19 deaths and over 28.7 million COVID-19 recoveries.

This article originally appeared on the Detroit Patch

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Tuesday, Oct. 13, coronavirus data by Michigan county: Southwest and south-central Michigan almost solid orange

Coronavirus transmission rates are heading into worrisome territory in large swaths of Michigan, including most of the state’s urban counties outside of metro Detroit/Ann Arbor.

That includes metro Grand Rapids and Lansing, as well as the Flint, Kalamazoo, Battle Creek, Jackson and Benton Harbor/St. Joseph areas. Twenty-two counties in the Lower Peninsula are now coded orange, based on a metric developed by the Harvard Global Health Initiative to assess coronavirus risk levels. That compares to 10 counties in the Lower Peninsula two weeks ago.

Orange signifies heightened concern, according to the Harvard Institute, which looks at the seven-day average of new cases per 100,000 residents. The newest assessment is based on data for Oct. 6-12.

Four counties went from yellow to orange as a result of Monday’s numbers. Those counties: Allegan, Van Buren, Lenawee and Clinton.

Already in the orange zone: Kent, Ottawa, Genesee, Ingham, Kalamazoo, Calhoun, Jackson, Eaton, Ionia, Berrien, Isabella, Clare, Barry, Mecosta, Newaygo, Gratiot, Cass and St. Joseph.

Meanwhile, coronavirus continues to rage in the Upper Peninsula, where 14 of the 15 counties in the Upper Peninsula are red or orange

The code red counties — with dangerously high level of the virus — are Iron, Houghton, Delta, Dickinson, Menominee, Mackinac and Keweenaw. The orange counties are Marquette, Gogebic, Ontonagon, Schoolcraft, Luce, Alger and Baraga.

The only U.P. county not on those lists are Chippewa, which includes Sault Ste. Marie.

At the other of the spectrum, two Michigan counties — Alcona and Wexford — are in the green zone as of Tuesday morning, based on the Harvard Institute metric. Those counties have minimal transmission of coronavirus right now.

The map below is shaded by the average number of new cases per day per 100,000 residents. The arrows indicate whether the total number of cases between Oct. 6-12 has gone up or down compared to the previous seven days (Sept. 29-Oct 5).

Readers can put their cursor over a county to see the underlying data. If you can’t see the map, click here.

Latest on coronavirus testing

Thirteen Michigan counties have a positive rate of at least 5% in coronavirus tests reported in the last seven days ending Oct. 11. The state is averaging almost 35,000 tests a day, and the state’s seven-day average positivity rate is 3.7%.

Dickinson County had the highest seven-day average at 19.2%, followed by Mackinac (12.8%), Luce (9.9%), Houghton (9%), Isabella (7.5%), Kalamazoo (7.4%), Delta (7.3%), Barry (6.6%), Genesee (5.9%), Macomb (5.6%), Iosco (5.4%), Calhoun (5.4%) and Mecosta (5.2%).

Note: The number of positive tests does not match confirmed cases because a single patient may be tested multiple times.

The federal Centers for Disease Control says schools are safe to open if fewer than 5% of coronavirus tests over the past week are positive.

The map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. Once again, readers can put their cursor over a county to see the underlying data. If you can’t see the map, click here.

Below are online databases that

Michigan Sen. Gary Peters shares story about ex-wife’s life-saving abortion for the first time

“The mental anguish someone goes through is intense,” Peters, a Michigan Democrat, said in an interview with Elle magazine published on Monday, “trying to have a miscarriage for a child that was wanted.”

But the situation became more critical when Heidi’s health deteriorated, so the couple found a doctor at another hospital who agreed to do the procedure.

In the interview, Peters spoke publicly for the first time about the abortion and the troubling moments leading up to the event, which threatened the life of his ex-wife. Peters now joins a small group of members of Congress who have spoken about their personal experiences with abortion.

“My story is one that’s tragically shared by so many Americans,” Peters tweeted on Monday. “It’s a story of gut-wrenching and complicated decisions — but it’s important for folks to understand families face these situations every day.”

Peters shared the story as he fights to retain his seat in the Senate in a battleground state that President Trump narrowly won in 2016. Peters faces John James, a well-funded Republican businessman and Army veteran.

His challenger supports limiting access to abortions, overturning Roe v. Wade, remains against abortions in cases of rape and incest, and compared abortions to “genocide” in 2018, according to MLive.com.

Peters suggested that his family’s experience colors his own view of abortion access.

“It’s important for folks to understand that these things happen to folks every day,” Peters said. “I’ve always considered myself pro-choice and believe women should be able to make these decisions themselves, but when you live it in real life, you realize the significant impact it can have on a family.”

Peters and Heidi had very much wanted the baby, which would have been their second child, he told Elle. But when Heidi’s water broke five months early, their doctor told them that without the amniotic fluid, the baby had no chance of survival.

Heidi’s health declined in the days that followed, and a doctor warned that if she did not have an abortion immediately, she could lose her uterus or die of a uterine infection that could cause her to become septic. After the hospital’s board rejected an appeal to make an exception for Heidi, the doctor urged the couple to go to another hospital for the abortion.

“I still vividly remember he left a message on the answering machine saying, ‘They refused to give me permission, not based on good medical practice, simply based on politics. I recommend you immediately find another physician who can do this procedure quickly,’” Peters told Elle.

They followed the doctor’s recommendation and Heidi was rushed into an emergency abortion at another hospital. It “enacted an incredible emotional toll,” Peters said.

In a statement to Elle, Heidi described those several days as “painful and traumatic.”

“If it weren’t for urgent and critical medical care, I could have lost my life,” she added.

“It’s important for folks who are willing to tell these stories to tell them, especially now,” Peters said. “This

Michigan Medicine begins recruitment for phase 3 of Janssen COVID-19 vaccine trial

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (WXYZ) — The University of Michigan announced Monday that Michigan Medicine has begun recruiting for phase 3 of the Janssen COVID-19 clinical trial.

The trial, known as the ENSEMBLE study, will evaluate a vaccine for the prevention of COVID-19 as part of a double-blind phase 3 clinical trial.

U-M is one of several sites across the world supporting the trial, which hopes to enroll up to 60,000 people worldwide.

“Michigan Medicine is committed to supporting the continued study of the investigational Janssen vaccine and other vaccine candidates. These trials are crucial to moving us toward an effective vaccine,” says Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., Dean, U-M Medical School, Executive Vice President, Medical Affairs and CEO, Michigan Medicine.

This is the second trial being done on COVID-19 vaccines at U-M. They are also doing an AstraZeneca trial.

Enrollment is open for both trials now, and you can apply to be part of it by visiting uofmhealth.org/covid19-vaccine

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Michigan Medicine, Janssen now recruiting for phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine and Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson, are now recruiting for a double-blind phase III COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

Known as the ENSEMBLE study, the trial will test an investigational vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

The University of Michigan is one of several test sites around the globe supporting the trial, which aims to enroll up to 60,000 volunteers. Researchers hope to enlist a diverse group of participants in the latest trial as part of Operation Warp Speed, a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services public/private partnership.

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“Michigan Medicine is committed to supporting the continued study of the investigational Janssen vaccine and other vaccine candidates. These trials are crucial to moving us toward an effective vaccine,” Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., Dean, U-M Medical School, Executive Vice President, Medical Affairs and CEO, Michigan Medicine said in a statement.

The Janssen study is the second COVID-19 trial to be recruiting at U-M, along with the AstraZeneca trial. Once enrollment opens for the trials, interested participants who meet qualifying criteria will be considered.

For more information about the study, visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/covid19-vaccine or email [email protected]

Copyright 2020 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

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Sunday, Oct. 11: Latest developments on coronavirus in Michigan

Over 104,000 Michiganders have recovered from the novel coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, state health officials say.

The state releases new data on recoveries every Saturday. Last weekend, the recoveries were at 99,521.

Michigan reported 1,522 new coronavirus cases Oct. 10, bringing the statewide total to 134,656, according to Saturday’s update from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Health officials also reported 15 new deaths of people with the virus, bringing the state’s running death toll to 6,891. The state’s case fatality rate is 5.3%.

Meanwhile, Michigan’s top Senate Republican lawmaker says he is in favor of rolling back many of the measures put in place by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration to limit COVID-19 spread and believes “an element of herd immunity” needs to happen in the state.

Here are the latest developments on the COVID-19 pandemic for Monday, Oct. 5.

Michigan needs ‘an element of herd immunity’ to recover from coronavirus, Senate leader says

Michigan Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey, R-Clark Lake, said he feels Michigan residents understand that COVID-19 is real, contagious and requires precautions.

But he also believes the state doesn’t need to continue with the “oppressive mandates” issued by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, he told MLive following a rally protesting strict COVID-19 restrictions.

“Nobody should be misled here or of the opinion that you can keep it from spreading – it’s going to spread, so we just do the best we can,” he continued.

“I’m also a big believer that there’s an element of herd immunity that needs to take place.”

But MDHHS spokesperson Lynn Sutfin told MLive last month the department favors reaching higher immunity levels through widespread vaccination as opposed to letting COVID-19 run through the population and is urging Michigan residents to minimize transmission until a vaccine is universally available.

“Since we do not know whether immunity is long-lasting, nor do we know the long-term effects of COVID-19, Michigan does not support allowing 80% of Michiganders being infected with this novel virus,” Sutfin said at the time.

Michigan’s health department is switching gears after a game-changing Supreme Court decision

A new state department is taking the reins when it comes to the rules people in Michigan have to follow during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Until this past week, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) had taken a back seat when it came to issuing orders aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19.

Instead, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration relied heavily on two state statutes that gave the governor broad power to issue executive orders under the looming threat of the emergency that is a global pandemic. The 1976 Emergency Management Act and/or the 1945 Emergency Powers of the Governor Act were the basis for a wide swath of orders issued by Whitmer, including requiring masks in public spaces, limits on crowd sizes, and requiring various establishments like movie theaters and gyms to stay closed for months.

“She had the broadest authority, and had authorities that we did not

Michigan Adds Over 1,400 New Coronavirus Cases, Deaths Top 6,800

MICHIGAN — Michigan added more than 1,400 new cases of the coronavirus on Monday, according to the most recent data provided by state health officials.

The state reported 1,407 new cases of the virus have been confirmed in Michigan, bringing the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases to 129,923. Thirteen more deaths also were reported in Michigan Monday, bringing the coronavirus death toll in the state to 6,816.

On Saturday, officials in Michigan said that 99,521 Michiganders had recovered from the coronavirus.

Don’t miss important updates from health and government officials on the impact of the coronavirus in Michigan. Sign up for Patch’s daily newsletters and email alerts.

According to the World Health Organization, Michigan is 17th in the U.S. in reported coronavirus cases. Michigan is 10th in the nation in COVID-19 deaths.

More than 7.6 million cases of the coronavirus have been reported in the U.S., according to the World Health Organization. Over 214,000 people in the U.S. have died from the virus. More than 4.8 million people in the U.S. have recovered from the virus.

Over 35.5 million cases of the coronavirus have been reported worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Of those, more than 1 million have resulted in deaths. More than 26.7 million cases are recoveries. Over 7.8 million cases of the virus remain active.

This article originally appeared on the Detroit Patch

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