Showing: 1 - 3 of 3 RESULTS

Gottlieb predicts “a lot of death and disease” before end of the year as COVID cases rise

Washington — With the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continuing to rise in states across the country, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, warned that there is going to be “a lot of death and disease” from now until the end of 2020.

“We’re in a difficult situation heading into the fall,” Gottlieb said Sunday on “Face the Nation.” “I think the only caveat is in terms of us being better prepared for this wave, is that we have dramatically improved clinical care in hospitals. So I think we’re going to have better outcomes overall, but we’re still going to have a lot of death and disease between now and the end of the year.”

There have been more than 7.7 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the U.S., and 15 states have a positivity rate above 10%. Forty states have an expanding epidemic, Gottlieb said, and hospitalizations are also rising.

In looking ahead to how the country will fare in the weeks ahead, Gottlieb predicted the U.S. is “going to face a difficult fall and winter.”

“What we thought might be just a bump after Labor Day clearly is a resurgence in a virus heading into the fall and the winter,” he said. “You’re seeing cases build across the entire country.”

The coronavirus swept through the halls of the White House this month, as President Trump, first lady Melania Trump and at least two dozen people in the president’s orbit have tested positive for COVID-19. Mr. Trump spent three days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center receiving treatment for the coronavirus, which included a dose of Regeneron’s antibody cocktail, which he has since heralded as a “cure” for the virus.

On Saturday, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said the president is “no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” but did not specify whether Mr. Trump has tested negative for the coronavirus.

Gottlieb, however, said the president will likely not test negative for “a period of time.”

“We know that people continue to shed virus for a long period of time, but that’s dead virus,” he said. “It’s a virus that doesn’t grow in a culture, can’t really pass on the infection. There are indications that the president’s no longer infectious.”

Gottlieb added it’s safe to assume Mr. Trump is no longer contagious, as he has been symptom-free for several days and has not had a fever for more than 24 hours.

“I think the question now is, has his health been restored?” he said. “And we know that a lot of patients have lingering effects from COVID.”

Source Article

Trump says ‘learned a lot about Covid’ during treatment [Video]

SHOTLIST

OCTOBER 4, 2020SOURCE: TWITTER / @REALDONALDTRUMPRESTRICTIONS: NO RESALEEDITORIAL USE ONLY

1. SOUNDBITE 1 – Donald Trump, president of the United States (male, English, 5 sec): “I learned a lot about Covid, I learned it by really going to school.”

2. SOUNDBITE 2 – Donald Trump, president of the United States (male, English, 10 sec): “This is the real school. This isn’t the ‘let’s read the books school,’ and I get it, and I understand it, and it’s a very interesting thing.”

///———————————————————–2 DEPECHES DE CONTEXTE:

URGENT ¥¥¥ Trump says ‘learned a lot about Covid’ by ‘really going to school’Washington, Oct 4, 2020 (AFP) – US President Donald Trump said Sunday he “learned a lot about Covid” by “really going to school” as he has battled the virus in hospital.”I learned a lot about Covid, I learned it by really going to school,” Trump said in a video posted to Twitter. “This is the real school. This isn’t the ‘let’s read the books school,’ and I get it, and I understand it, and it’s a very interesting thing.”Shortly after sharing the video, Trump left Walter Reed hospital outside Washington for a surprise visit to supporters gathered outside. Video footage showed the president wearing a face mask and waving to crowds as he drove past.to/ft

————————————————————- 

leadTrump back in hospital after saluting supportersWashington, Oct 4, 2020 (AFP) – US President Donald Trump drove past supporters on Sunday outside the hospital where he was being treated for Covid-19, after announcing on Twitter a “surprise visit” to his backers.Seen in a dark face mask, waving to crowds, the president’s motorcade rolled past before returning to the Walter Reed military hospital near Washington.”We’re going to pay a little surprise to some of the great patriots that we have out on the street,” Trump said in a video posted to Twitter shortly before his appearance.”I’m about to make a little surprise visit.”Trump also said he “learned a lot about Covid” by “really going to school,” as he has battled the virus in hospital.”This is the real school. This isn’t the ‘let’s read the books school,’ and I get it, and I understand it, and it’s a very interesting thing,” he added.Trump’s doctors said Sunday that he has “continued to improve,” adding that he could be discharged as early as Monday.bur-jm/to

————————————————————- 

Source Article

We’re paying a lot of attention to Trump’s case, but the US just recorded the most daily COVID-19 infections in nearly 2 months

The news of President Donald Trump and members of his inner circle testing positive for COVID-19 has sent shock waves across the country, but it’s not just the White House dealing with an onslaught of cases: Friday’s nationwide case count was the highest daily total in nearly two months, while the weekly average of cases reported has seen an increase.

The world reacts after President Trump and first lady Melania test positive for COVID-19

UP NEXT

UP NEXT



chart, line chart, histogram: The United States recorded its highest single-day case count since mid-August on Friday, October 2, 2020.


© USA TODAY
The United States recorded its highest single-day case count since mid-August on Friday, October 2, 2020.

There were more than 54,000 positive cases of the coronavirus reported on Friday, the highest single-day case count since Aug. 14, when the country recorded just over 64,000 cases, per Johns Hopkins University data. 

Loading...

Load Error

The country’s daily cases peaked on July 16, when 77,362 positive tests were reported. 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

The seven-day rolling average for daily U.S. case counts has risen in recent weeks as well. The moving average has held above 42,000 in recent days, the highest mark since late August, according to COVID Tracking Project data.

Meanwhile, deaths have held relatively steady in recent weeks, as the weekly average is down a bit from a flare-up in late July and early August. Still, 906 Americans were announced dead from COVID-19 on Friday.

Keep up with the latest data in your state: Tracking coronavirus in the US

A USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Saturday shows six states – Alaska, Indiana, Kentucky, Montana, Wisconsin and Wyoming – set records for new cases in a week while two states – South Dakota and Wisconsin – had a record number of deaths in a week.

The spike in Wisconsin has been particularly sharp.

The state, which did not report a weekly average of more than 1,000 cases per day until September, has been routinely reporting more than 2,000 since Sept. 17. Deaths have started to tick up as well – the state reported its highest single-day number, 27, this week. 

New York state, once a hot spot for the virus, has experienced a jump in cases as well. After daily case counts held steady in the state for much of the summer, New York is holding its highest seven-day rolling average since early June, per COVID Tracking Project data.

Gallery: Dr. Fauci Says This One State Is ‘Asking for Trouble’ (Best Life)

The overall national COVID-19 “positivity rate” in the U.S. has hovered around 5% since the middle of September, according to John Hopkins. At the beginning of August, it was 8%. A “positivity rate” is the percentage of all coronavirus tests that are positive and it is a useful indicator of whether testing is keeping up with infections. 

If the number is too high it could mean that health authorities are disproportionately testing sicker patients or missing milder or asymptomatic cases. A low figure