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Coronavirus may live much longer than the flu virus on smartphone screens

The virus that causes COVID-19 can stay active on smooth surfaces like smartphones, metal surfaces and paper money for much longer than the flu virus, according to researchers from Australia’s national science agency. They found that it can remain viable for up to 28 days, albeit in a very controlled environment. Under the same conditions, the influenza virus remains infectious for just 17 days, according to the study.

The team said the research proves that the coronavirus is “extremely robust” compared to other viruses. “These findings demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious for significantly longer time periods than generally considered possible,” the study concludes. (Cloth and other porous surfaces can carry infectious virus for just half the time, or around 14 days.)

While it shows the importance of cleaning and disinfecting phones and other surfaces, the study comes with some large caveats. It was conducted at a constant 68 degree F temperature in dark conditions to negate the effects of UV light, far from real-world conditions. The experiment also didn’t use fresh mucous — normally present with viruses on surfaces — which contain white cells and antibodies. “In my opinion infectious viruses will only persist for hours in mucus on surfaces rather than days,” Cardiff University professor Ron Eccles told the BBC.

Recently, experts have also downplayed the risk of coronavirus transmission from surfaces. According to the center for disease control (CDC), “spread from touching surfaces is not thought to be a common way that COVID-19 spreads.” Rather, the most common vectors are respiratory droplets produced by coughing or sneezing. New guidelines also suggest that it can also be transmitted by airborne transmission in “poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise.”

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Doctor says Trump no longer a transmission risk to others

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus

On Saturday night, a little over a week after President Donald Trump announced his COVID-19 diagnosis, White House physician Sean Conley released a memo stating that the president “no longer poses an infection risk” to others.

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that, in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” Conley wrote in the memo.

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According to The Hill, the White House has not provided the exact date when the president last tested negative for COVID-19. But Conley’s memo gives Trump permission to resume holding public gatherings.

Read More: Trump makes 1st public appearance since his hospital stay

On Saturday, the president spoke from a balcony to hundreds of supports standing on the South Lawn of the White House. At the event, social distancing guidelines were ignored and mask-wearing was minimal at best, showing that Trump’s approach to the virus has not changed, despite being personally stricken by the disease that has killed almost 215,000 in the country at Sunday afternoon’s check of Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at the point where their symptoms ebb and they have gone at least 24 hours without a fever. However, the agency says that some severely ill patients may need to isolate for 20 days.

Read More: Trump to give White House balcony speech on ‘law and order’

In the memo, Conley also said that Trump has been “fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved,” but he did not specify the last time the president had a fever.

Conley wrote that diagnostic tests indicated “there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus.” Conley said that moving forward, he will continue to clinically monitor the president as he returns to an active schedule.

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The post Doctor says Trump no longer a transmission risk to others appeared first on TheGrio.

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Trump No Longer a COVID-19 ‘Transmission Risk,’ White House Doctor Says

President Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, his doctor said Saturday evening, nine days after the president first tested positive for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Conley added.

Conley’s announcement came hours after Trump held his first public event since his October 1 diagnosis, which had been followed by a three-day stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Ahead of the event, the White House would not say whether Trump had yet tested negative for the coronavirus.

Trump delivered remarks in a brief 18-minute address on law and order from the White House balcony to a crowd of several hundred mostly- masked supporters on the South Lawn.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, only briefly mentioning his health.

He said he was thankful for the good wishes and prayers he received and said the pandemic was “disappearing,” though it has killed more than 210,000 Americans and shows no signs of slowing down.

Conley issued a statement Thursday evening saying that he anticipated Trump would be able to hold public events again by Saturday.

“Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote, adding that, “Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagement at that time.”

The president has also announced he would hold a campaign rally on Monday in Florida, as well.

More than two dozen coronavirus cases have been tied to the White House or people who spent time with Trump, according to NPR. A number of attendees of the White House’s ceremony for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett have tested positive, including the president, several top staffers, senators and military officials. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Friday called the September 26 event in the Rose Garden, in which most attendees closely mingled mask-less, a “super-spreader” for the coronavirus.

Ahead of Trump’s Saturday remarks on law and order, in a show of newfound concern over the virus, guests were asked to wear a mask on the White House grounds and told they would be subject to temperature checks and a brief questionnaire about recent symptoms, the Wall Street Journal reported.

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Trump no longer poses infection risk, White House doctor says

President Donald Trump “no longer poses an infection risk” to others and can safely end his isolation period, according to a memo released Saturday night by White House physician Sean Conley, just over a week after the president announced his Covid-19 diagnosis.

The doctor’s memo came hours after Trump made his first public appearance since his three-day hospital stay — and released an ad touting his recovery from the coronavirus.

Tests of samples taken Saturday morning from the president show that “by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk,” Conley wrote. At ten days after he first developed symptoms, and after going fever-free for more than 24 hours, Trump met “CDC criteria” for ending isolation, the doctor added.

The CDC says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at or beyond that point when their symptoms ebb and they have gone at least 24 hours without a fever. But some severely ill patients may need to isolate for at least 20 days, the agency says.

Early in his illness, the president was given oxygen treatment as well as dexamethasone, a steroid normally reserved for severely ill Covid-19 patients with lung damage.

Conley also said the president’s medical team could not find any evidence that the coronavirus is replicating in his body, and the amount of virus present in Trump’s body has decreased over time.

But Conley did not say whether the president had tested negative for the virus, which could still be present in his body. And there is no FDA-authorized or approved test that can tell when a person is no longer contagious, making it hard to gauge the reliability of the tests that Conley cited in his memo.

The latest information still leaves out some crucial information for judging Trump’s health — such as the condition of his lungs, and whether he has any lingering damage from the virus.

Over the course of his infection, Trump received a combination of treatments that few if any other coronavirus patients have taken together. Although the FDA has authorized broad emergency use of one drug — the antiviral remdesivir — and dexamethasone has been on the market for decades, Trump also received an unproven antibody treatment made by Regeneron.

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With people living longer, advisors make sure you don’t outlive money

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Alfred Abraham has had colon cancer, prostate cancer, open heart surgery and his left eye removed.

Yet at 100, he’s still alive and well. Every day, he and his partner Brian eat fruit and salad and go for walks. He and his family were planning a big party to celebrate his becoming a centenarian this past April, but the pandemic wouldn’t allow for it. 

“At the present time, I’m doing very nicely despite what’s going on,” said Abraham, a former CPA and bank executive who lives in New York. 

One big part of why he’s doing so well is his financial advisor, he says.

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“He’s doing a very good job for me,” Abraham said. “We talk at least once or twice a month to discuss my investments and financial plans.” 

There were more than 450,000 centenarians in the world in 2015, a  number that is expected to balloon to more than 3.6 million by 2050.

Although life expectancy has actually decreased slightly over the last few years, due to a rise in drug overdoses, suicide rates and liver disease, it’s becoming more likely that people make it into their 80s, 90s and beyond. A 65-year-old woman today has a 50% chance of living to 85, and a 25% chance of crossing into her 90s, according to the Schwab Center for Financial Research. 

One of the biggest concerns investors have is outliving their money – and it’s often their financial advisors who work with them to make sure this fear doesn’t become a reality.

As a result, financial advisors are increasingly accounting for the real possibility that their clients could be around for very long time. That includes finding ways to stretch out their savings and to protect their money from the risks and expenses associated with old age.

Amy Irvine

Source: Amy Irvine

“When we’re planning for clients, we’re planning to 95 or 100,” said Amy Irvine, a certified financial planner at Rooted Planning Group in Corning, New York.

“Many of our retirees are still in great shape,” she said. “They’re living longer, and requiring resources for longer.”

Stretching out clients’ savings 

Carolyn McClanahan, a CFP and director of financial planning at Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida, said too many advisors don’t think about how long their clients could live. 

“If you have a client who lives a very healthy life, and especially if they have longevity in their family, you should be planning to age 100,” McClanahan said. 

And sometimes the planning needs to go in the opposite direction, she said. 

“If you have clients who are absolutely not taking care of themselves, say they’re obese and have diabetes and smoke, you shouldn’t be using age 100 because you’re going to make that person not enjoy their money because they’re worried about running out,” she said.

Still,