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Aiming to hit top fitness levels post Covid recovery, says Surender Kumar

(MENAFN – IANS)

New Delhi, Oct 12 (IANS) Defender Surender Kumar, who was one of the six players of the Indian men’s hockey team too have tested positive for Covid-19 in August, has revealed that the entire period was mentally very challenging for him.

“I would often tell myself that so many people around the globe have battled this virus including top sports people and have come out of it. It was a difficult phase but I am really grateful for the kind of support system we had from Hockey India and SAI who made every effort to get us the best treatment,” Kumar said.

Unlike his other compatriots who had tested positive and recovered, Kumar had developed venous thrombosis, a condition in which there are blood clots. It is one of the many complications related to Covid-19 recovery phase.

“Again, I am grateful to Hockey India and SAI for ensuring my recovery is closely monitored. I get my routine check-ups done regularly. We also have a doctor on campus who I can consult in case of any discomfort. I feel we are just fortunate to have this kind of support. My focus now is on hockey,” he said.

“The team coaching staff ensured we were in a good space mentally for that entire period of two-three weeks where we were in the hospital followed by mandatory isolation,” added the defender from Karnal Haryana who was part of the Indian Team for Rio Olympics in 2016.

Having returned to the pitch in mid-September and join the rest of the team, his main aim is to gain full-fitness.

“I am happy to be back to regular schedule with the rest of the core group. Initially, chief coach would emphasis on taking it slow and not exerting too much even though we would feel no discomfort in pushing ourselves. It’s now been over three weeks since I have returned to training. I am feeling good and aiming to hit top fitness levels,” he said.

–IANS

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Aiming to Hit Top Fitness Levels Post Covid-19 Recovery, Says Surender Kumar

Defender Surender Kumar, who was one of the six players of the Indian men’s hockey team too have tested positive for Covid-19 in August, has revealed that the entire period was mentally very challenging for him.

“I would often tell myself that so many people around the globe have battled this virus including top sports people and have come out of it. It was a difficult phase but I am really grateful for the kind of support system we had from Hockey India and SAI who made every effort to get us the best treatment,” Kumar said.

Unlike his other compatriots who had tested positive and recovered, Kumar had developed venous thrombosis, a condition in which there are blood clots. It is one of the many complications related to Covid-19 recovery phase.

“Again, I am grateful to Hockey India and SAI for ensuring my recovery is closely monitored. I get my routine check-ups done regularly. We also have a doctor on campus who I can consult in case of any discomfort. I feel we are just fortunate to have this kind of support. My focus now is on hockey,” he said.

“The team coaching staff ensured we were in a good space mentally for that entire period of two-three weeks where we were in the hospital followed by mandatory isolation,” added the defender from Karnal Haryana who was part of the Indian Team for Rio Olympics in 2016.

Having returned to the pitch in mid-September and join the rest of the team, his main aim is to gain full-fitness.

“I am happy to be back to regular schedule with the rest of the core group. Initially, chief coach would emphasis on taking it slow and not exerting too much even though we would feel no discomfort in pushing ourselves. It’s now been over three weeks since I have returned to training. I am feeling good and aiming to hit top fitness levels,” he said.

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Face masks have negligible negative effect on CO2 and O2 levels

A new study suggests that face masks have a negligible negative effect on the levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen that a person breathes.

The findings even hold true for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The research, which appears in the journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society, contributes to dispelling some of the myths surrounding the use of face masks in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

As the world gains access to more information about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, scientists have become increasingly convinced that masks can help reduce its spread.

The primary way that SARS-CoV-2 transmits involves viral particles entering a person’s respiratory tract. This typically happens after another person coughs, sneezes, or speaks near them, producing droplets or aerosols that transport the virus.

Consequently, face masks play an important role in reducing exposure to the virus and limiting the amount of the virus that a person can project toward others.

There is a growing consensus about the value of face masks in reducing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, though this has not always been the case.

Initially, little was known about the new virus and policy had to be developed based on the best available evidence, following scientific models that drew on data from earlier epidemics involving similar viruses.

As a consequence, guidance about mask wearing has varied from country to country, and some major health bodies, including the World Health Organization (WHO), have changed their advice over time.

In many ways, these changes and discrepancies are inevitable when providing advice about an urgent public health crisis while scientists are continually discovering new information. Dogmatically sticking to a position despite the changing evidence or offering advice when there is little evidence to justify it are unlikely to be better approaches.

However, research has shown that significant changes in official guidance reduce people’s trust in the science that is the basis of the policy.

In addition, the use of face masks has become a political battleground, with vocal proponents on the right denouncing enforced mask wearing, either as an infringement of freedom or a suspected element in a broad conspiracy that COVID-19 was mobilized or fabricated.

In this context, some people have proposed that face masks are a threat to public health, supposing that the masks reduce the amount of inhaled oxygen or increase the amount of inhaled carbon dioxide.

To test this theory, the researchers behind the present small study recruited 15 house staff physicians, who had no health issues affecting their lungs, and 15 veterans with COPD.

The veterans were in the hospital so that doctors could check their oxygen levels as part of their regular COPD monitoring.

The monitoring involved, among other things, blood oxygen levels checked with a blood test before and after a 6-minute walking exercise. This exercise was done while wearing a mask, as per hospital protocol during a pandemic.

The researchers used a LifeSense monitor to check the baseline room air, and then continually took

Elderly hit so hard by COVID-19 because of lower levels of certain immune cells

Elderly people who get COVID-19 have lower levels of important immune cells, which may explain why they are more likely than younger patients to have severe symptoms or die, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed blood samples from 30 people with mild COVID-19, ranging in age from the mid-20s to late-90s. Compared with healthy people, all of the COVID-19 patients had lower numbers of T cells — which target virus-infected cells — in their blood.

But COVID-19 patients over 80 years of age had fewer T cells than those who were younger, and so-called “killer” T cells in older patients produced lower amounts of cytotoxic molecules that find and kill infected cells, the investigators found.

This age-related difference in immune response may partially explain why older COVID-19 patients have more severe illness, according to the authors of the study published this month in the journal mBio.

“Elderly people have more severe diseases compared to young people, and we found that the cytotoxic part of immune control is not as efficient to respond to the virus in older people,” said study leader Gennadiy Zelinskyy, a virologist at University Hospital Essen, in Germany.

The lower levels of T cells in COVID-19 patients is among the many unwelcome surprises of the pandemic, he noted in a news release from the American Society for Microbiology.

Once inside the body, most viruses trigger a boost in T cells, including cytotoxic-producing killer T cells that play a critical role in destroying virus-infected cells. If a person’s immune system produces fewer of these T cells, it has greater difficulty combating a viral infection.

The findings suggest that cytotoxic T cells play a key role in control of early infections, but Zelinskyy said it’s too soon to know if these cells can be used to create an immunotherapy against the new coronavirus.

More study is needed to understand the potential risks and benefits of interfering with T cells as a way to control the new coronavirus and other viruses, he concluded.

More information
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on COVID-19.

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