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Victims of disgraced Harley Street dentist call for ‘outrageous’ legal loophole to be closed as they launch battle for compensation

Victims of a disgraced Harley Street dentist who was kicked out of the profession for a catalogue of botched procedures have launched a legal bid for compensation.

Fraser Pearce, 51, was left with a pierced sinus from faulty dental work by Dr Shahram Sahba, while Helen Pitt, 55, had £10,000 of veneers fitted in a negligent attempt to fix a receding gum line.

Dr Sahba, who ran the Lister House Dental Clinic in London’s famous medical district, was struck off last year after his professional regulator found him guilty of more than 400 charges of misconduct, negligence, and dishonesty.


A first attempt by his patients to sue for damages was blocked, as the disgraced dentist had left England and his insurers had no obligation to pay out when their client was not co-operating.

Fraser Pearce 

Mr Pearce and Ms Pitt, represented by law firm Devonshires, are now using the Consumer Credit Act to bring fresh legal action, to get money back via the credit card transactions used to pay for the botched procedures.

William Collins, a specialist medical negligence lawyer from Devonshires, called situation “outrageous” and called for the government to close the legal loophole.

Mr Pearce, a business consultant from Sandwich, Kent, needed an operation to try to repair his sinus after work by Dr Sabha, and also discovered the dentist had applied a crown to a perfectly health tooth.

“I felt physically violated”, he said. “I was really angry as I felt like he had breached the relationship between a doctor and his patient.”

Helen Pitt (Submitted)

Ms Pitt, who was treated by Dr Sahba for six years, may need to have her veneers replaced every ten years. She said: “I was so angry as I would never have had them fitted if I’d known that was the case.”

She added: “Dentists are in a position to do serious damage to their patients, so how can it be that dentists are allowed to have insurance that is discretionary and does not protect patients?”

Dr Sahba, who ran his practice just off Harley Street between 2009 and 2015, did not return from Sweden for a General Dental Council disciplinary hearing last year, when he struck off the professional register.

As well as botched procedures, he was found to have charged patients for work they did not receive and also lied about his qualifications.

Source Article

Mexico, Plagued by Cartel Wars, on Cusp of Legal Cannabis ‘Green Rush’ | World News

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – For Guillermo Nieto, a Mexican businessman who grew up smoking pot, the cannabis greenhouse on his family’s vast farmlands in Guanajuato state is part of a bigger dream. One that involves deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies.

Nieto and several Mexican businessmen have spent years positioning themselves for a time when the country opens up what would be the world’s biggest legal cannabis market in terms of population, where the drug can be lawfully cultivated and sold.

Mexico finally outlined rules in July covering cannabis for medical use, and the sign-off is expected in coming weeks.

A bigger prize may also be close for Nieto and foreign companies; Senate majority leader Ricardo Monreal told Reuters he expected a law to be passed before December for recreational use of the drug, allowing regulated private firms to sell it to the public.

“It’s going to generate a market,” said Nieto, wearing a smart blue shirt, blazer, and bright marijuana-leaf print yellow socks. “We are expecting to create jobs and revenue for the government. We think it could really help our economy.”

Indeed the legal cannabis industry is already a multi-billion-dollar global trade, and some big players, including Canada’s Canopy Growth and The Green Organic Dutchman, and a unit of California-based Medical Marijuana Inc, told Reuters they were eager to tap the new Mexican market.

Business aside, Nieto says the new regulations will have a profound social impact on the conservative nation of 126 million people, where drugs are a sensitive subject due to a long and painful history of violence perpetuated by feuding cartels.

“The first thing that will happen is that no Mexican will die or go to jail because of this plant,” Nieto said.

“With that, everyone wins.”

Dario Contreras Sanchez aims to set up a business making products like soaps and pain-relieving oils from cannabis that he would grow legally near his family’s hacienda in Durango state, where the powerful Sinaloa Cartel has held sway for decades.

He believes farmers near him who cultivate the plant for narcos would want to sell their produce lawfully – if the government permits them.

“Most of the people want to work legally,” said Contreras Sanchez, whose sister married into the family of former Mexican drug lord Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

However Mexicans are by no means unified on this issue.

While a growing cannabis industry promises to be a money-spinner, it faces resistance from campaigners who are worried that regulations for both medical and non-medical cannabis will heavily favor big, often foreign corporations.

They fear legislation will shut out small family producers and fail to offer a path to legalization for many farmers who make a living by feeding Mexico’s illegal narcotics trade.

The initial regulations covering medical use permit entrepreneurs such as Nieto to grow marijuana on behalf of pharmaceutical companies and allows foreign businesses to import medical cannabis products into the country.

However Mexico’s Supreme Court, which has effectively legalized cannabis by ruling prohibition is unconstitutional, has given the government

Mexico, plagued by cartel wars, on cusp of legal cannabis ‘green rush’

By Drazen Jorgic

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – For Guillermo Nieto, a Mexican businessman who grew up smoking pot, the cannabis greenhouse on his family’s vast farmlands in Guanajuato state is part of a bigger dream. One that involves deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies.

Nieto and several Mexican businessmen have spent years positioning themselves for a time when the country opens up what would be the world’s biggest legal cannabis market in terms of population, where the drug can be lawfully cultivated and sold.

Mexico finally outlined rules in July covering cannabis for medical use, and the sign-off is expected in coming weeks.

A bigger prize may also be close for Nieto and foreign companies; Senate majority leader Ricardo Monreal told Reuters he expected a law to be passed before December for recreational use of the drug, allowing regulated private firms to sell it to the public.

“It’s going to generate a market,” said Nieto, wearing a smart blue shirt, blazer, and bright marijuana-leaf print yellow socks. “We are expecting to create jobs and revenue for the government. We think it could really help our economy.”

Indeed the legal cannabis industry is already a multi-billion-dollar global trade, and some big players, including Canada’s Canopy Growth and The Green Organic Dutchman, and a unit of California-based Medical Marijuana Inc, told Reuters they were eager to tap the new Mexican market.

Business aside, Nieto says the new regulations will have a profound social impact on the conservative nation of 126 million people, where drugs are a sensitive subject due to a long and painful history of violence perpetuated by feuding cartels.

“The first thing that will happen is that no Mexican will die or go to jail because of this plant,” Nieto said.

“With that, everyone wins.”

Dario Contreras Sanchez aims to set up a business making products like soaps and pain-relieving oils from cannabis that he would grow legally near his family’s hacienda in Durango state, where the powerful Sinaloa Cartel has held sway for decades.

He believes farmers near him who cultivate the plant for narcos would want to sell their produce lawfully – if the government permits them.

“Most of the people want to work legally,” said Contreras Sanchez, whose sister married into the family of former Mexican drug lord Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

However Mexicans are by no means unified on this issue.

While a growing cannabis industry promises to be a money-spinner, it faces resistance from campaigners who are worried that regulations for both medical and non-medical cannabis will heavily favor big, often foreign corporations.

They fear legislation will shut out small family producers and fail to offer a path to legalization for many farmers who make a living by feeding Mexico’s illegal narcotics trade.

‘GREEN RUSH’ FRONTIER

The initial regulations covering medical use permit entrepreneurs such as Nieto to grow marijuana on behalf of pharmaceutical companies and allows foreign businesses to import medical cannabis products into the country.

However Mexico’s Supreme Court, which has effectively legalized cannabis by