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Nina Agdal gets heart rates soaring in a red sports bra as she leads fitness class

In quarantine, Danish supermodel Nina Agdal has made the transition from walking runways to leading workout classes. 

The 28-year-old stunner whose been spending her time in the Hamptons with boyfriend Jack Brinkley Cook, 25, was spotted arriving at her socially distanced workout class in Amagansett. 

The model was masked up at The Reform Club Inn, as she prepared to get heart rates soaring at her Agdal Method class. 

Agdal method: Supermodel Nina Agdal, 28, prepared to teach one of her workout classes out in The Hamptons on Saturday. The Danish born beauty wore a red sports bra and a pair of tight spandex as she taught a group in a socially distanced class

For her day of teaching, Nina showed off her statuesque physique in a red Nike sports bra that she paired with black spandex leggings. 

She toted along a green sweatshirt around her waist, tucking her cell phone in her leggings as she walked to the front of the class. 

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Preparing to get barefoot for the lesson, Nina sported a fun pair of tie dye socks and slides as she went makeup free. 

The Victoria’s Secret stunner kept her hair out of her face in a tight topknot, as she slid her sunglasses atop her head.

Toned and ready: The Danish born model walked to the front of her class with a mask on as she got ready to sweat it all out on Saturday
Sweat session: Nina led her intimate class of fitness enthusiasts outside as they switched between various strength training and toning exercises

 Making sure to protect herself and others, Nina kept her mask on very tight until she was up at the front in her designated space. 

In snaps shared to social media, followers of the method were seen standing on yoga mats with resistance bands and ankle weights as they engaged in a sculpt session. 

The fitness method which launched in app form in mid March, allows its consumers to get access to various workouts, in addition to nutrition guides and tips.  

Nina has grown a loyal following, engaging her clients in various core-strengthening workouts weekly, and holding in person classes since August. 

Workout: The fitness method which launched in app form in mid March, allows its consumers to get access to various workouts Nina does, in addition to nutrition guides and tips

Work and play: Nina rocked a unitard as she joked it was her ‘everyday uniform’ on social media, taking her from her workout classes to the streets

On Friday, Nina took to Instagram to do a Q+A with her 1.6M followers as she answered questions about fitness and her health journey. 

The model shared a lot about herself, revealing that even as a model she struggles with body image and weight. 

She wrote, ‘My weight has fluctuated like crazy the past 12 years. I started full time modeling at 18 and my weight was all over the place. I’ve been 120 pounds and I’ve

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Postdoctoral researcher Susanne Vogeler (front left), Lucie-Liane Duchesne (back left) and Microbiologist Diane Kapareiko (right) study mussel feeding rates in the field. Credit: NOAA Fisheries

Shannon Meseck, a NOAA Fisheries research chemist and marathon runner, was initially interested in how ultra-runners can tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide than non-athletes. A chance conversation with a medical doctor about ciliated cells in the human lung turned on a light bulb in her head. Could similarities between the function of these cells in humans and in blue mussels explain the mussels’ response to increasing acidification in the ocean?


Blue mussels, one of the mollusks Meseck studies, are economically and environmentally important filter-feeding bivalves. Like other bivalves, they use their gills for feeding and respiration. Gill cilia—microscopic, hair-like structures—create and control the current that allows water and food to flow over the gills. The cilia also help capture and sort food particles.

Similar ciliated cells in the human lung have receptors that sense the environment, including carbon dioxide concentration. They signal responses that can include changes in cilia beat frequency. Ultra-runners’ lungs are very efficient at this. They can tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide in the body than non-athletes, and don’t get “winded” as quickly or for as long.

What if, thought Meseck, the increased carbon dioxide characteristic of ocean acidification also inhibited shellfish cilia? Feeding and respiration would also be inhibited. This “what if” question led to a study conducted by the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center’s laboratory in Milford, Connecticut.

This study may be the first to show that shellfish gill cilia slow down with increasing dissolved carbon dioxide. The results confirm that elevated carbon dioxide concentration reduces feeding rates of blue mussels. Further, the researchers found evidence that slowing the cilia beat frequency—how often they twitch and move water—causes these decreased feeding rates. This is similar to what can happen in human lungs. These findings are important to understanding how ocean acidification affects shellfish and marine ecosystems. The study appeared in Ecological Indicators.

What Happens to Mussels When There’s Too Much Carbon Dioxide?

Reduced feeding and filtration have important implications for energy and growth in blue mussels, as well as ecosystem level effects. “Bivalve filtration is an ecosystem service, and how ocean acidification may be affecting that must be better understood,” said Meseck.

As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration increases, the ocean is absorbing approximately 30 percent of it, making the water more acidic. In the Northeastern United States, dissolved carbon dioxide in seawater increased 2.5 percent from 2007 to 2015.

Researchers measured the feeding rates of mussels in low and high carbon dioxide conditions in a field experiment in Milford Harbor. They used a biodeposition method developed by other Milford researchers. For comparison, a similar experiment was conducted in the laboratory, exposing blue mussels to two different carbon dioxide concentrations using an experimental delivery system.

In both the field and laboratory experiments, the volume of water that the mussels filtered over time was lower at higher carbon dioxide