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Jennifer Kocour Named Chief Operating Officer of CCT Research as Company Continues U.S. Expansion

An experienced clinical research leader, Kocour will oversee business operations and strategic growth for the CCT Network of Sites

CCT Research, a company offering an innovative approach to conducting clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of debilitating diseases, announced today that Jennifer Kocour has joined the company as its Chief Operating Officer. Kocour brings a wealth of industry experience, having started her career as a Clinical Research Assistant before advancing to roles as a Site Coordinator, Regional Manager, Clinical Team Lead, and Vice President of Operations.

Kocour’s appointment comes as CCT Research continues to rapidly expand its geographic and therapeutic reach since opening its doors in 2017. “I’m excited to join a company that’s dedicated to industry innovation, exceptional patient care, and the growth and development of our staff as we continue to grow as a company,” said Kocour.

CCT Research currently has 17 sites across Arizona, Nebraska, and Utah. The sites are located in physicians’ offices, medical clinics, and senior living communities; and the company is looking to add partner sites in new markets. By embedding its clinical research infrastructure and staff into these facilities, CCT Research provides convenient and comfortable study locations for qualified patients in a variety of therapeutic areas. Recently, the company was selected to partner with several top pharmaceutical companies to conduct trials for a COVID-19 vaccine.

“Strong leadership is key to supporting these critical study efforts and future medical research,” said CJ Anderson, President of CCT Research. “Jennifer is a proven leader, and her diverse background provides an understanding of each individual’s role in conducting a successful clinical trial. We’re happy to have her as the newest member of our executive leadership team.”

About CCT Research

CCT Research is a company offering an innovative approach to conducting clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of debilitating diseases. CCT’s research sites are located within physicians’ offices, medical clinics, and senior living communities to support research in the fields of Neurology, Family Practice, and Dermatology, with plans to include additional therapy areas in the near future. The company’s unique model simplifies the process for trial participants and provides pharmaceutical sponsors with high quality data. For more information, visit cctresearch.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005945/en/

Contacts

CJ Anderson, President
CCT Research
480-702-3501
[email protected]

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Broadway Icon Jennifer Holliday’s 60th Birthday Virtual Concert to Support National Affordable Housing Program

As a part of her 60th birthday celebration, Broadway’s Original Dreamgirl has partnered with AIDS Healthcare Foundation and the Black Leadership AIDS Crisis Coalition (BLACC) to produce a 2-hour virtual concert event that will support the Healthy Housing Foundation

In recognition of her 60th birthday, Broadway’s original Dreamgirl, Jennifer Holliday, has partnered with AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) and the Black Leadership AIDS Crisis Coalition (BLACC) to produce a 90-minute virtual concert event, scheduled for Monday, October 19, 2020, starting at 8:00pm (EST). Tickets, which can be purchased at stellartickets.com, are $20 and $60 for VIP tickets, which includes a virtual meet & greet. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Healthy Housing Foundation, and their critical work in helping individuals and families move from homelessness to housing and providing truly accessible affordable housing for low-income families.

Joined by a six-piece band, Holliday will perform hits from the musical Dreamgirls, a tribute to her childhood idol, Aretha Franklin, and original songs from her diverse repertoire of recordings. The concert will also feature special messages from an array of celebrities, including Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg, Mariah Carey, Loretta DeVine, Sheryl Lee Ralph and many more.

“Our country is experiencing an affordable housing crisis at epidemic proportions. The Healthy Housing Foundation is committed to using innovative strategies to not only move individuals and families from homelessness to housing, but to also increase truly affordable housing for our most vulnerable population,” stated Anita Castille, AHF Vice-President, “AHF and the Black Leadership AIDS Crisis Coalition is so pleased to partner with the original Dreamgirl to not only celebrate her 60th birthday, but to have a party with a purpose.”

Most recently seen by audiences from across the globe in her earth-shattering portrayal of Shug Avery in the Tony-winning revival of The Color Purple, two-time Tony and Grammy award-winning artist Jennifer Holliday landed her first big role on Broadway in 1979 at age 19, in the production of Your Arms Too Short to Box with God the same day she auditioned for the show. Only two years later, at age 21, she would land the iconic role of Effie White in the Broadway musical Dreamgirls, which introduced her soul-stirring vocal abilities to audiences across the globe. Having originated the role of Effie, she remained with the show for nearly four years after its December 20, 1981 opening. During this time, Holliday’s sweep of awards included the Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical, a Grammy Award and Drama Desk and Theater World awards for her acting performance. Since winning the Tony in 1982 for her performance in Dreamgirls—as well as a Grammy for her pop cover of the anthem “And I Am Telling You”—Holliday has gone on to reprise her performance as Effie White numerous times, including on tour and at the Muny in 2012. Over her extraordinary career, spanning four decades, she has performed in the touring company of Sing, Mahalia, Sing, starred

Emmanuelle Charpentier, Jennifer Doudna win Nobel Prize in Chemistry for genome editing tool

Oct. 7 (UPI) — A French scientist and an American professor were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for their work in developing a “genetic scissors” used to fight human diseases.

Emmanuelle Charpentier, a French-born researcher and director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Germany, and Jennifer Doudna, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, were given the chemistry prize, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced in Stockholm.

The pair worked together to help develop the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editor, which is capable of cutting DNA genomes in precise locations and allowing researchers to add or delete pieces of genetic material or make changes by replacing an existing segment with a customized sequence.

The tool’s development has led to widespread applications for genome editing — and is faster, more accurate, more efficient and less expensive than other existing methods.

The CRISPR/Cas9 system is used to research a wide variety of diseases, including single-gene disorders including cystic fibrosis, hemophilia and sickle cell disease. It also holds some promise for treating and preventing complex diseases like cancer, heart disease, mental illness and HIV/AIDS.

Genome editing has also found a strong presence in agriculture, where it’s used to develop crops resistant to mold, pests and drought.

After publishing an initial discovery in 2011, Charpentier teamed with Doudna to develop the “genetic scissors” to make it easier to use. The next year, they proved it could be controlled and used to cut any DNA molecule at a predetermined site.

“There is enormous power in this genetic tool, which affects us all,” Claes Gustafsson, chairman of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, said in a statement Wednesday. “It has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to ground-breaking new medical treatments.”

Due to ethical considerations, scientists are limited to using CRISPR/Cas9 in humans on somatic cells — cells other than egg and sperm cells. Changes made in those cells are not passed from one generation to the next.

The Nobel Prize for medicine was awarded Monday to Americans Harvey J. Alter and Charles M. Rice and Briton Michael Houghton for their work on curing Hepatitis C; the prize for physics was given Tuesday to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez for their research on black holes.

The Nobel Prize in Literature will be awarded Thursday, the peace prize on Friday and the prize for economic sciences on Oct. 12.

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