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Cy-Fair ISD school board approves additional desk shields for second half of semester

With more students returning for the second half of the fall semester, the Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees approved the purchase of additional desk and tabletop protective dividers for protection during the COVID-19 pandemic.

After Trustee Tom Jackson asked about the desk shields’ effectiveness, Chief of Staff Teresa Hull said the shields have been approved by Memorial Hermann doctors collaborating with the school district and advising the district on precautionary COVID-19 measures.


“When we started looking at the number of students that we anticipated would be returning to campus, especially the second marking period, we reached out to Memorial Hermann and asked that very question,” Hull said. “They felt very strongly that that absolutely was a layer of protection; when you couple it with the mask, it definitely is helping us minimize the number students that may be identified as a close contact (during contact tracing).”

Previously, Chief Financial Officer Karen Smith said the district is working on recovering funds used on COVID-19 precautions and online learning.

“Because we didn’t have face to face (instruction) in the building there are costs we simply did not incur,” Smith said. “But if you recall we have instructional packets that we delivered. We purchased PPE when we were planning for this before COVID actually hit so bad that the schools were closed.”

Cy-Fair ISD has lost $2.2 million in revenue from food services, $16.1 million is expected to be spent from the general fund for the 2020-2021 school year, $500,000 was spent on personal protective equipment and $5.2 million for social distancing measures and more according to the presentation from Oct. 8.

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Humble ISD prepares volleyball, football events to bring awareness to breast cancer in October

With breast cancer awareness month beginning in October, the Humble ISD athletics department will do their part in the fight to bring awareness to the battle against the deadly disease.

Across the district, several sports will hold special games dedicated to cancer survivors, people fighting cancer and the people that have been lost.

Volleyball teams throughout the month of October will have matches raising money and awareness for breast cancer. Humble ISD has donated all proceeds in the past to the American Cancer Society.


Kingwood Park’s famous Dig Pink at the Park game will be back to raise money for breast cancer on Oct. 20 against Porter at 6:30 p.m.

Schools will hold raffles during volleyball matches to raises money and schools will also make T-shirts as well to donate to charities.

During volleyball matches players will wear pink on their uniforms from hair ties, to knee pads, and even bracelets while the whole crowd is covered with pink.

People are asked to stand and be recognized during the match for those who are cancer survivors and are give standing ovations by the crowd.

The district will also celebrate breast cancer awareness at Turner Stadium during the football season as well in October.

The District 21-6A contest between North Shore and Humble at 7 p.m. Oct. 29 has been named the Breast Cancer Awareness game of the season.

Football players will wear pink on their uniforms whether it’s a towel, gloves, or socks. Cancer survivors, people fighting cancer and the lives that have been lost to cancer will be recognized along with fans in the stands.

Players will wear pink throughout the month of October to honor and bring awareness to breasts cancer during football games at Turner Stadium.

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Conroe ISD to extend free lunches to all students

With the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, Conroe ISD will be offering free breakfast and lunch meals to all students in the district starting Thursday.

In response to the increased need for free meals due to the economic impact of COVID-19, the USDA allowed districts to apply for a waiver to continue the free meal program for all students and members of the community. Typically, this program is only offered in the summer months. The extension will last through Dec. 31 or until funding runs out.

“This unprecedented move will help ensure — no matter what the situation is on-the-ground — children have access to nutritious food as the country recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to a release from the federal office. “USDA has been and continues to be committed to using the Congressionally appropriated funding that has been made available.”

The district applied for the waiver right after the USDA announced the opportunity and received approval this week. The program is available to youth 18 years old and younger, they do not have to be students of the district.


Robyn Hughes, Director of Child Nutrition for CISD, estimates that the district will be serving between 35,000 and 40,000 students through this program. Currently, the district gives free meals to around 16,000 of the 65,000 students in the district. Since March, when schools closed, the district has given away around one million free meals to students.

“Over the past six months, partners across the country have stood up nearly 80,000 sites, handing out meals at a higher reimbursement rate than the traditional school year program,” according to the USDA release. “USDA has continuously recalculated remaining appropriated funds to determine how far we may be able to provide waivers into the future, as Congress did not authorize enough funding for the entire 2020-2021 school year.”

The only requirement for the program is that the meals are meant for youth 18 years old and younger. Parents can pick up the meals but will need to bring some form of identification for their child, like their student ID or birth certificate. Pick up for meals will be Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the seven Junior High campuses in the district.

“We feel like it’s going to be a benefit to our community because so many people have been impacted financially by the pandemic, so this is going to help them with their daily expenses,” Hughes said. “It’s just going to be one less thing for parents to have to worry about and we’re going to be able to provide a nutritious meal.”

Applying for the waiver was a “no-brainer,” Hughes said, because of how it could benefit the community. This is not usually an option for districts during a regular year, so it came as a surprise to Hughes when it was announced.

“We were really glad o hear that,” she said. “It was a pleasant surprise.”

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