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Teen infected relatives in four states during family vacation, CDC says

In a recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released by the CDC, 11 separate coronavirus cases across four states were traced back to one 13-year-old child.



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coronavirus COVID-19 CDC HHS us centers for disease control and prevention department of health and human services federal agencies approve

Exposure to the virus occurred during a three-week family gathering at which five families met. The age of the attendees ranged from 9-72 years-old. The families shared a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house and the CDC report points out that the family members did not wear masks or practice social distancing.

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It should be noted that although several states began requiring masks to be worn in public in April, data confirming their effectiveness in combating the spread of the coronavirus was not known until late June and the shared house would not necessarily classify as a public space. Six relatives who later joined the event remained outdoors and practiced social distancing without staying at the house.

Of the 14 people who stayed inside the house, 12 were later diagnosed with COVID-19 after experiencing symptoms. None of the six people who stayed outdoors were diagnosed with the coronavirus.

The report used this incident to highlight that children and teens can be the source of COVID-19 outbreaks in their families even if their symptoms are mild and show the demonstrated benefit of social distancing.

The necessity to quarantine after possible exposure, even with a negative test, is also indicated in the report.

These recommendations come as President Trump recently held a rally in Florida on Monday less than 20 days after experiencing severe coronavirus symptoms. Trump’s doctor reported on Monday that he had tested negative for the virus on consecutive tests using the Abbott antigen test.

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Dozens infected, nine dead in COVID-19 outbreak at a Santa Cruz County nursing home

Coronavirus has infected dozens of residents, with nine dead, at a nursing home in Watsonville, Calif., in Santa Cruz County.
Coronavirus has infected dozens of residents, with nine dead, at a nursing home in Watsonville, Calif., in Santa Cruz County.

A skilled nursing home in Santa Cruz County is suffering a severe outbreak of COVID-19, with 61 people having tested positive and nine dead, a county health spokeswoman said Thursday.

Of the 61 infected at the Watsonville Post-Acute Center, nine were staff. All those who died were residents and ranged in age from their early 70s to 90s, said Corinne Hyland, a public information officer for the county Department of Public Health. The facility is licensed for 95 beds.

Hyland said the facility had been following state guidelines for employee testing, which exposed the outbreak. The center reported the outbreak to the county on Sept. 17 after a resident tested positive. An outbreak at a nursing home is defined as an infection in one resident. Visitors have been barred during the pandemic, she said.

“It spread pretty quickly,” Hyland said. “Unfortunately, this is a very vulnerable population.”

Dr. David Ghilarducci, deputy health officer for Santa Cruz County, said the county’s public health staff was working closely with the facility to control the outbreak.

Santa Cruz County health officials have been visiting the facility daily to review protocols on isolation, quarantine, testing and screening, and to respond to requests for more resources.

Officials from the California Department of Public Health have made multiple visits to the facility to assess the situation and make recommendations, and the California National Guard also is providing help, the county said.

Because many nursing home employees work in more than one facility, the county immediately alerted other homes of the outbreak, Hyland said. She added that the county was tracing the contacts of the infected.

“This is really a large outbreak,” Hyland said. “We haven’t seen this sort of thing in our county until now.”

The Watsonville center’s website has reported previous infections in the past but in small numbers. The website indicates that past infections have been among employees.

Gerald E. Hunter, the facility’s administrator, said on the website there were 23 residents and four staff members who were positive for the virus on Oct. 5. He said the county’s numbers reflected the total infected since the outbreak started.

“Each day we evaluate all of our residents following CDPH and County of Santa Cruz guidelines to determine whom meets the criteria to be transferred out of the unit,” said Hunter on the website. He did not immediately respond to a request for an interview.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

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Trump Returns to Oval Office While Infected With Coronavirus | National News

President Donald Trump, who announced he tested positive for the coronavirus less than a week ago, returned to the Oval Office on Wednesday.

Photos: Donald Trump, the Past 2 Weeks

trump covid

According to the White House, Trump was being briefed on Hurricane Delta in the Gulf of Mexico and stimulus talks, which he has delivered conflicting messages about this week. The president returned from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to the White House on Monday evening where he removed his mask and posed for photos.

Chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters at the White House on Wednesday that if Trump “decides to go to the Oval, we’ve got safety protocols there.”

Trump’s doctor on Wednesday released a statement on the president’s health, saying he reports feeling great and has no coronavirus symptoms.

Lab work from Monday detected antibodies in Trump’s system that were not detectable as of last Thursday, Dr. Sean Conley said. However, Trump was administered an experimental antibody combination from Regeneron last week, and Conley did not address what role that treatment could play in the lab results.

A Regeneron spokeswoman told The New York Times that “given the volume of IgG antibodies delivered in our therapy, and the timing of these tests, it is likely that the second test is detecting” antibodies from the treatment.

Trump’s current treatment regimen is unclear. He was scheduled to receive a final dose of remdesivir on Tuesday, but his doctor did not mention the treatment in his brief updates Tuesday or Wednesday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention generally recommends a person who had coronavirus can resume being around others 10 days after symptom onset if they have been fever-free for 24 hours without the help of medication and other symptoms are improving.

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10% of the world may have been infected by Covid-19, WHO official says



a person in a car: Health care workers greet people as they arrive at a temporary drive-through COVID-19 testing site at East Orange District Park on October 1, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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Health care workers greet people as they arrive at a temporary drive-through COVID-19 testing site at East Orange District Park on October 1, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The novel coronavirus may have infected about one in 10 people globally, meaning the majority of the world remains vulnerable to Covid-19, a World Health Organization official has said.

“Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus,” Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme, said at a WHO executive board meeting Monday.

“This varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies between different groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk,” Ryan added.

There are more than 35.5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases globally, according to the widely-used Johns Hopkins University dashboard, but WHO and other experts say that is almost certainly an enormous undercount. Over the summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said cases in the US had likely been undercounted by at least 90%.

With a global population of about 7.7 billion people, Ryan’s estimate would mean about 770 million have been infected — but most have not been diagnosed or counted.

Ryan noted Monday that Southeast Asia continues to see a surge in cases, while Europe and Eastern Mediterranean regions were seeing an increase in cases and deaths. However, he noted that the situation in Africa and the Western Pacific was “currently rather more positive.”

Worldwide, countries are struggling to contain resurgent outbreaks and are reintroducing measures in a bid to curb the spread of the virus.

“We are now heading into a difficult period. The disease continues to spread,” Ryan said.

Only four European countries are now measuring below a crucial level of Covid-19 cases, according the latest figures Monday, with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control’s (ECDC) warning in its latest risk assessment the risk of Covid-19 is high, with a very high probability of infection, while vulnerable individuals face a “very high impact” from the disease.

Overall cases in the US are on the rise as well, with the country reporting more than 50,000 daily cases on Friday and Saturday. The last time the US saw more than 50,000 cases back to back was in mid-August, and the country’s leading infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci has warned that the country is still behind on testing.

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About 200 workers infected with coronavirus at MOL’s new Hungarian plant

BUDAPEST (Reuters) – About 200 workers have been infected with coronavirus at Hungarian energy group MOL’s <MOLB.BU> polyol plant being built in the eastern town of Tiszaujvaros, MOL’s petrochemicals unit wrote in a letter to the town’s mayor.

A press official for MOL confirmed the authenticity of the letter, dated Oct. 5 and published by the mayor on Facebook.

The letter said the 200 infected workers have been quarantined and had no symptoms. MOL said work at the construction site was ongoing with reduced staff levels.

The $1.3 billion plant, built by Germany’s ThyssenKrupp <TKAG.DE>, will make MOL the only integrated producer of polyether polyols in Central and Eastern Europe.

The compounds are needed for products in the automotive, construction, packaging and furniture industries.

MOL said in the letter it was testing its blue-collar staff for coronavirus every two to three weeks and expected to test all white-collar workers by the end of this month. MOL said it expected subcontractors to test their staff as well.

As of Tuesday, Hungary reported 32,298 coronavirus cases with 853 deaths and 8,723 recoveries. New cases have spiked in the past weeks and the 20 deaths registered on Tuesday were the highest since the start of the pandemic.

(Reporting by Gergely Szakacs; Editing by Tomasz Janowski)

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We shouldn’t be surprised that Trump is infected

Donald Trump; Evening News with Norah O
Donald Trump; Evening News with Norah O

Donald Trump on “Evening News with Norah O’Donnell” CBS

That Donald and Melania Trump should test positive for what was described as relatively mild COVID-19 seems both sad and avoidable, the inevitable and ironic result of snubbing mask-wearing and physical distancing.

It is what it is, after all.

That the White House and the Trump campaign were not forthright about learning that close adviser Hope Hicks had been found infected and went ahead with fund-raisers and lots of contacts without taking precautions is reprehensible.

Amid calls for recovery were notes of open disbelief over whether the news as announced was true, questions about the First Couple’s medical status and a chaotic race to reach scores of people with whom Trump and Hicks had contact over the previous four days. Worry mounted about exactly how the government is functioning, as a result, to say nothing of the effects on elections.

The White House never acknowledged the Hicks contagion for at least a full day after learning of it. A bevy of others were exposed to the illness. People need to hold someone responsible.

Opponent Joe Biden tested negative after contact with Trump at the Tuesday debate, but three senators, the Trump campaign manager and head of the Republican National Committee, White House staffers and guests and three journalists at White House events are ill.

Through the day, as Trump was moved to Walter Reed Hospital, it sounded as if Trump was sicker than acknowledged. But then again, it was hard to tell: The White House is controlling closely the information.

Public health enforcement

I could not help but compare these circumstances with the earlier days of HIV/AIDS, when some with that illness who continued to practice unprotected sex ended up facing criminal charges of homicide or attempted homicide and assault. Criminal transmission of HIV is  better known as HIV non-disclosure.

What exactly is different here?

There are 37 states with laws that criminalize HIV exposure in cases where those testing positive intentionally infect others – or simply fail to notify contacts. Some states even extend criminality to undisclosed status in blood donation or amp up prostitution charges.

In other words, when it came to HIV/AIDS, our Law and Order administrations took it seriously.

By contrast, in the case of COVID-19, a global pandemic, the Trump administration occasionally talks about masks. Then it goes out of its way to avoid mask-wearing or physical distancing in its campaign rallies, in White House gatherings, in meetings. Trump steps on his own medical advisers when they contradict him and promote mask-wearing.

Obviously, Team Trump has resisted actively public health enforcement by either the federal government or states and localities, arguing anything that slows down the economy will be worse for Americans. Trump and allies have made clear – and made political – the idea that church-going outscores any acknowledgment of contagion and that mask-less campaign rallies are more important than public safety.

Somehow, Team Trump succeeded

321 infected at garment factory in Sri Lanka

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Sri Lanka confirmed more than 300 garment factory workers have been infected with the coronavirus, after reporting its first community infection in two months.

The health ministry said 321 cases have been identified in the cluster as of Tuesday after the first patient was diagnosed at a hospital two days ago.

To contain the outbreak, the government imposed a curfew in two suburbs of the capital where the majority of patients live, closed schools and universities, and imposed restrictions on public transport.

For more than two months, Sri Lanka health officials have said they have prevented a community spread of the virus and that all diagnosed patients had belonged to two known clusters.

The country has reported 3,471 patients with 13 deaths. Of the total patients, 3,259 have recovered.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House after leaving hospital where he received unprecedented level of care for COVID-19

— Trump’s return to the White House puts focus on people who could be further exposed if he doesn’t abide by isolation protocols

— Some survivors and kin of those who have died are angry over Trump’s advice not to fear COVID-19

— White House blocks FDA guidelines on bringing potential vaccines to market that would almost certainly prevent approval before election

— Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for over one-third of Israel’s virus patients as non-compliance tests gov’t and public health officials

— About 25 residents from Easter Island stranded 6 months in Tahiti will finally be able to return home this week on French military plane

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

NEW DELHI — India has registered 61,267 new coronavirus cases, its lowest daily increase since Aug. 25.

The country with nearly 6.7 million reported infections has had the highest single-day increases in the world for nearly 45 days. The last three weeks, however, have seen a gradual decline.

The Health Ministry on Tuesday also reported 884 deaths in the past 24 hours. The death toll now stands at 103,569.

India has the second-highest number of reported infections and is on track to exceed the caseload in the United States within weeks.

India’s recovery rate is more than 84%, the highest in the world, and nearly 5.7 million people have recovered, according to the Health Ministry.

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Trump Was Already Infected with COVID-19 When He Called Into Fox News on Thursday: Reports

Drew Angerer/Getty Images President Donald Trump heads to Marine One outside the White House en route to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday night.

Amid a wave of conflicting information from the White House about when President Donald Trump was first diagnosed with COVID-19, multiple news outlets now report the president knew he had already tested positive by the time he called into Sean Hannity’s Fox News program on Thursday night.

The president had already tested positive for COVID-19 on a rapid test and was awaiting further confirmation from a more secure PCR test while he was speaking with Hannity, according to CBS News and The Wall Street Journal which cited White House sources.

Calling into the program from the White House, Trump revealed his close adviser Hope Hicks had tested positive earlier in the day, calling it a “terrible thing.”

Trump, 74, then told Hannity that he and First Lady Melania Trump, 50, were waiting on their own test results—but failed to mention he already tested positive on a rapid test earlier that afternoon.

“So whether we quarantine or whether we have it, I don’t know,” Trump said, referring to Hicks’ infection.

RELATED: Trump’s Chief of Staff Says President’s ‘Blood Oxygen Level Dropped Rapidly,’ Had ‘Fever’ on Friday

Shutterstock Donald Trump

The reports further extend the timeline of Trump’s infection last week, while White House officials and the president’s doctors have since given contradictory statements about the president’s current health status and when, or how, he contracted the highly contagious respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus.

The Trumps’ positive diagnoses added their names to the 7.4 million Americans who have contracted the virus, according to a New York Times tracker. At least 209,603 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19 this year.

“Don’t tell anyone,” Trump reportedly told a senior aide after he initially tested positive on Thursday, according to The Wall Street Journal.

ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images President Donald Trump waves to onlookers during a brief trip outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Sunday.

RELATED: Ivana Trump ‘Stressed’ and ‘Afraid’ Over Ex-Husband Donald’s Hospitalization: ‘He Was Careless’

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images Donald Trump’s doctors

A White House official told CBS News that the Trump administration learned Hicks had tested positive “minutes before” Trump took off for a fundraising event at his private golf club in New Jersey on Thursday, forcing some officials to stay behind from the trip while a likely infected Trump carried on with his travels despite knowingly being exposed to the virus.

The official told CBS News that the White House isn’t able to do rapid testing on the road and Trump only received the rapid test upon returning back to Washington, D.C., later that evening.

RELATED: Secret Service Agents Slam Trump’s Car Ride Outside Walter Reed While Hospitalized with COVID-19

Yuri Gripas/POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock President Donald Trump returns from Bedminster, New Jersey, on Thursday.

The Times reported that an infected Trump came in contact with

WHO: 1 in 10 people worldwide may have been infected by coronavirus

As much as 10 percent of the world’s population may have been infected with the coronavirus since the beginning of the pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated on Monday.

The United Nations (UN) agency’s head of emergency response said at a briefing that millions of people remain at risk of contracting the virus due to persistent outbreaks in Southeast Asia and Europe, according to multiple news outlets.

“Our current best estimates tell us about 10 percent of the global population may have been infected by this virus. It varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies depending on groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk,” Dr. Michael Ryan said, according to Reuters.

“We are now heading into a difficult period. The disease continues to spread,” he continued.

Reuters also reported that the WHO official appeared to criticize China’s efforts to stop the virus from spreading in his remarks, blasting the country for a “failure” to provide accurate information to public health officials.

His comments come as the U.S. has for months accused China’s government of not doing enough to ensure that public health officials had access to accurate data about COVID-19 during the early months of the pandemic’s emergence in Wuhan, China.

U.S. officials have up until now also blamed the WHO for past statements they argued were too deferential to Chinese authorities, criticism which led the Trump administration to withdraw the U.S. from the organization.

Other top U.S. officials such as President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE have attempted to coin nicknames for the virus linking it to China, efforts which have been sharply criticized as leading to instances of discrimination and bigotry against Asian-Americans.

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Infected Trump greets supporters in motorcade outside hospital; his health unclear

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Doctors treating President Donald Trump for COVID-19 sent conflicting signals about the severity of his condition on Sunday, hours before the president surprised supporters gathered outside the hospital with an impromptu motorcade.

Trump, 74, wore a mask as he waved from the back seat of a black SUV that crawled in a caravan of vehicles in front of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center outside Washington, while supporters waving Trump 2020 flags chanted: “USA! USA!”

Trump, who said on Friday morning he had the infectious disease, was swiftly criticized for risking the health of support staff.

It was Trump’s first appearance in public since he was evacuated to the hospital on Friday.

“It’s a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID,” he said in a video posted on Twitter shortly beforehand.

Democratic presidential challenger Joe Biden tested negative again for the disease that has killed more than 200,000 Americans, his campaign said on Sunday. The former vice president, who shared a debate stage with Trump last Tuesday, previously tested negative in two tests on Friday, the day Trump disclosed his coronavirus infection.

Doctors said the president was improving, although they were monitoring the condition of his lungs after he received supplemental oxygen. They said he could be sent back to the White House as soon as Monday.

But Dr. Sean P. Conley said the president’s condition had been worse than he previously admitted. Conley said Trump’s blood oxygen levels had dropped in prior days and that he had run a high fever on Friday morning.

Asked what tests had revealed about the condition of Trump’s lungs, Conley replied: “There’s some expected findings, but nothing of any major clinical concern.”

Conley’s response suggested the X-rays revealed some signs of pneumonia, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University.

“The expected finding is that he has evidence of pneumonia in the X-ray. If it was normal they would just say it is normal,” Adalja said.

Other doctors not involved in Trump’s treatment said there was evidence his case was severe. Trump is being given dexmethasone, a steroid used in severe COVID cases, as well as the intravenous antiviral drug Remdesivir and an experimental antibody treatment from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

“It would be very unlikely for him to be out and about, and on the campaign trail in less than 14 days,” said Dr. David Battinelli, chief medical officer at New York’s Northwell Health.

Administration officials have given contradictory assessments of Trump’s health. Conley and other doctors delivered a positive prognosis on Saturday, which was promptly undercut by Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.

“I was trying to reflect an upbeat attitude of the team and the president about the course his illness has had,” Conley told reporters on Sunday. “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction.”

‘IRRESPONSIBILITY’

Trump spent much of the year downplaying the risks of the COVID-19