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Nevada Halts Use of Rapid Coronavirus Tests in Nursing Homes, Citing Inaccuracies

Kristen Cardillo, BD’s vice president of global communication, said the company was aware of the situation in Nevada and was “conducting thorough investigations.” She added that “based on the information in the directive and the total tests performed, we believe the rate of reported false positives is well within what we would expect for the BD Veritor System.”

Representatives for the Department of Health and Human Services did not respond to requests for comment.

Concerns have also been raised about the ability of antigen tests to accurately pinpoint infections, especially if administered during a period when a person harbors low levels of the coronavirus. BD’s test is advertised as having a false negative rate of 16 percent. Quidel’s is just above 3 percent. The directive from Nevada’s department of health did not report whether the negative antigen test results from nursing homes — there were nearly 3,700 such results — had been confirmed by P.C.R.

In a call with LeadingAge members on Monday, Adm. Brett Giroir, who has been leading the nation’s testing efforts, said antigen tests were “clearly a lifesaving option,” and for many facilities the best test available, given the delays, expenses and shortages that had plagued P.C.R. tests.

“It is perfectly acceptable for congregate care, particularly nursing homes, to use an antigen test, even if they are, quote, off-label,” Dr. Giroir said in the interview. “Just because they don’t have an authorization doesn’t mean they’re not good for it.”

In response to questions about false positives, Dr. Giroir reminded LeadingAge members that in places where the coronavirus is scarce, false positives should be expected to outnumber true positives and do not necessarily invalidate the usefulness of a test. “That’s a function of the way life is,” Dr. Giroir said.

The halt to antigen testing in Nevada’s nursing homes comes just days after health experts criticized the White House, which is now in the midst of a coronavirus outbreak, for a misguided overreliance on rapid testing. For months, officials used two products made by Abbott Laboratories, the ID NOW and the BinaxNOW, to test people without symptoms — another off-label use — while eschewing masks and physical distancing. In September, the White House also began distributing millions of BinaxNOW tests to communities across the country, including nursing homes around the country.

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A night of rapid-fire interruptions and inaccuracies

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

U.S. President Donald Trump participates in the first presidential debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at the Health Education Campus of Case Western Reserve University on September 29, 2020 in Cleveland, Ohio. This is the first of three planned debates between the two candidates in the lead up to the election on November 3. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Tuesday night, President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden appeared for the first presidential debate, offering voters their first side-by-side comparison of the candidates.

Little was said about what either candidate would do if elected; at one point, Biden’s attempts to explain his health care plan were drowned out by Trump’s persistent interruptions about Biden’s Democratic primary opponents.

Instead, the presidential nominees traded a dizzying array of accusations and falsehoods. Our partners at PolitiFact unpacked a number of them for you in their wide-ranging debate night fact check.

Here are some health care highlights:

Trump: “I’m getting [insulin] so cheap it’s like water.”Rating: Mostly False

Trump signed an executive order on insulin at the end of July, but the scope was limited. It targeted a select group of health care providers that represent fewer than 2% of the relevant outlets for insulin. Between 2017 and 2018, insulin prices for seniors rose.

“The truth is that patients who need drugs like insulin are having a hard time affording them, particularly for the many who are now uninsured,” said Vanderbilt Medical Center’s Stacie Dusetzina.

Biden: “The president has no plan” for the coronavirus pandemic. Needs context

The Trump administration has announced a plan for distributing vaccines. The plan shows that the federal government aims to make the two-dose vaccine free of cost, for instance.

However, public health experts have said Trump and his administration did not have a plan to combat the pandemic or a national testing plan.

Biden: Trump suggested that “maybe you could inject some bleach in your arm and that would take care of [the coronavirus].” Needs context

Trump did not explicitly suggest that people inject bleach into their arms. He did express interest in exploring whether disinfectants could be applied to the site of a coronavirus infection. The comment came after an administration official presented a study that found sun exposure and cleaning agents like bleach could kill the virus when it lingers on surfaces.

Trump said at the time: “And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in one minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning, because you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs, so it’d be interesting to check that, so that you’re going to have to use medical doctors with, but it sounds interesting to me.”

During the debate Tuesday, Trump discounted his previous remarks as “sarcastic.”

Trump: Biden “wants to shut down the country.” Needs context

In an interview with CBS News, Biden