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Supreme Court Won’t Immediately Revive Abortion-Pill Restriction

The first drug, mifepristone, blocks the effects of progesterone, a hormone without which the lining of the uterus begins to break down. A second drug, misoprostol, taken 24 to 48 hours later, induces contractions of the uterus that expel its contents.

The contested measure requires women to appear in person to pick up the mifepristone and to sign a form, even when they had already consulted with their doctors remotely. The women can then take the drug when and where they choose. There is no requirement that women pick up misoprostol in person, and it is available at retail and mail-order pharmacies.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups, all represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, sued to suspend the requirement that women make a trip to obtain the first drug in light of the pandemic. There was no good reason, the groups said, to require a visit when the drug could be delivered or mailed.

Judge Theodore D. Chuang, of the Federal District Court in Maryland, blocked the measure, saying that requiring pregnant women, many of them poor, to travel to obtain the drug imposed needless risk and delay, particularly given that the pandemic had forced many clinics to reduce their hours.

He imposed a nationwide injunction, reasoning that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more than 60,000 members practicing in all 50 states and that its membership includes some 90 percent of the nation’s obstetricians and gynecologists.

A unanimous three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, Va., refused to stay Judge Chuang’s injunction while an appeal moved forward. The Trump administration, which often seeks Supreme Court intervention on an emergency basis when it loses in the lower courts, asked the justices to stay the injunction.

The acting solicitor general, Jeffrey B. Wall, argued that the regulation was sensible, as it gave women an opportunity to consult with their doctors and ensured that they would receive the drug without delay. He added that the regulation did not impose the sort of substantial obstacle to access to abortion barred by the court’s precedents because it was still possible to obtain surgical abortions.

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Olivia Newton-John tearfully talks breast cancer diagnosis: ‘I knew immediately something was wrong’

Olivia Newton-John opened up about the first time she was diagnosed with breast cancer in a tearful video shared on Monday.

The “A Little More Love” singer was first diagnosed with the disease in 1992, had a secret battle with cancer in 2013 and her most recent diagnosis in 2017.

Newton-John, 72, currently has stage four metastatic breast cancer.

JOHN TRAVOLTA PRAISES ‘GREASE’ CO-STAR OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN AMID HER CANCER BATTLE: ‘I’M VERY PROUD OF HER’

The “Grease” actress announced a new foundation in her name to help other cancer survivors.

Olivia Newton-John attends 2018 G'Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie Gala 

Olivia Newton-John attends 2018 G’Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie Gala 
(Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

“I am probably one of those people who’s living beyond cancer, living beyond probably what people expected to happen,” the Australian singer said in her video.

She then got tearful recalling her 1992 diagnosis and said, “I knew immediately something was wrong.

“I had a mammogram. The mammogram was benign and I had a needle biopsy that was also benign,” Newton-John said. But she persisted and got a surgical biopsy, which then led to her breast cancer diagnosis.

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN GIVES HEALTH UPDATE ON BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS

The singer added: “I don’t say this to scare women, but you have to just trust your instincts.

“All this was overwhelming. It was a feeling of dread, terror, the unknown,” she said of that time.

Newton-John then added she chose to be strong moving forward for the sake of her daughter, Chloe Lattanzi.

“I made the decision that I was going to be okay. I had to believe I was going to be okay, that my daughter was the most important thing in my life and I would be okay for her,” the Grammy winner said.

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She also discussed her combination of cancer treatments ranging from chemotherapy, meditation, acupuncture, massage, and plant medicine to help her manage her pain.

Newton-John has long been an advocate for medicinal marijuana.

“Plant medicine has played an amazing role in my life. I have seen the incredible beauty of the plants and their healing abilities,” the actress said. “I know it sounds strange but if I hadn’t had that experience, I wouldn’t be sitting here talking to you about kinder therapies.”

She added: “Your body wants to heal itself. That’s why I’m excited to start this foundation.”

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The Olivia Newton-John foundation notes on their website, “We will fund the discovery of kinder therapies and advocate for more effective ways to prevent, treat and cure all cancers.”

In January, the actress gave a positive health update and revealed her tumors shrunk in size.

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