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10 More Children Catch COVID-19: New Hampshire Update

CONCORD, NH — The state of New Hampshire crossed over the 500,000 polymerase chain reaction test threshold Monday with another 65 residents, including 10 children, contracting COVID-19, according to state health officials.

After collecting nearly 4,900 specimens Sunday and waiting on nearly 900 test results, the State Joint Information Center reported a 1.2 percent positivity rate for Monday. About a third of the new positives came from antigen tests while the rest were polymerase chain reaction tests. The state has collected 503,076 PCR tests while testing 295,921 people.

Currently, there are 738 Granite Staters who have the virus, 9,208 accumulative cases, and 8,014 recoveries. Seventeen remain hospitalized receiving more extensive case and more than half of the new cases were male.

Of the new infections, 22 live in Rockingham County, 12 live in Nashua, 10 live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, and two live in Merrimack County.

Nashua has the most active cases — 96, following by Bedford and Manchester with 89, and Warner with 36. Merrimack has 19 cases and Salem has 13. Hampton has 11 with Amherst, Exeter, and Londonderry at nine, and Concord, Portsmouth, and Windham have eight. North Hampton has five cases Milford has between one and four active cases.

Approximately 3,500 people are under public health monitoring.

Because of new cases, Belknap County has moved from minimal community transmission to moderate on the community level transmission metrics data page. The entire state of New Hampshire is in the moderate category due to 66.5 cases per 100,000 during the past two weeks. The seven-day PCR counts and hospitalization rates are still in the minimal section statewide. Both Manchester and Nashua are in the substantial metrics category.

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New K-12 school infections including one case at the Paul A. Smith Elementary School in Franklin, a second new case at Londonderry Senior High School, the first case at Franklin High School, and the first case at the Granite State Arts Academy Charter School. The Ellis School in Fremont also has its second case and the Chester Academy has its second case, too.

According to the state’s data dashboard, 57 K-12 schools have active student or staff positive test results.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs

55 More COVID-19 Cases In New Hampshire; Another Death: Update

CONCORD, NH — Fifty-five more New Hampshire residents have tested positive for COVID-19, according to state health officials.

Fourteen of the new positive tests were children and 30 of them were female. Sixteen reside in Rockingham County, 11 live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, five live in Merrimack, and three live in Nashua. The state is still investigating the residency of three cases.

A few more than 6,900 specimens were collected Saturday with a little more than 1,100 tests pending. The state said 0.8 percent of the polymerase chain reaction tests were positive. Sunday’s positive tests were a mix of both PCR and antigen tests. More than 293,000 New Hampshire residents about 19.5 percent of all residents have been tested. The state has administered nearly 498,000 PCR tests.

Accumulatively, 9,143 people have contracted the coronavirus while 8,002 or 88 percent have recovered.

Two of the Granite Staters who have tested positive required hospitalization while 22 are currently hospitalized. All of the new positive cases have identified risk factors — meaning they were in close contact with a confirmed case or associated with an outbreak setting.

Another elderly resident of Hillsborough County has also died, according to health officials. He lived in a long-term care setting and was between 70 and 79 years of age.

Approximately 3,300 Granite Staters are under public health monitoring.

A few new cases were connected to K-12 school settings in the state.

The Tabernacle Christian School in Hudson has reported its first case. The Riddle Brook Elementary School in Bedford now has its third active cases. The Ellis Elementary School in Fremont also reported its first infection.

There are 53 active cases of COVID-19 in K-12 schools in New Hampshire.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs to stay home and not go out into public places.

  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic and underlying health conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.

  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.

  • Employers should work from home as much as possible.

  • There is increasing evidence that the virus can survive for hours or possibly days on surfaces. People should clean frequently touched surfaces, including door handles, grocery carts and grocery basket handles, etc.

Take the same precautions as you would if you were sick:

  • Stay home and avoid public places.

  • Wear

Merrimack County Woman Dies: New Hampshire Coronavirus Update

CONCORD, NH — Another elderly resident of New Hampshire has died due to complications of or due to COVID-19, according to state health officials.

The woman was 60 years of age or older and lived in Merrimack County but no other information was available at post time. The state updated yesterday’s information to report that the Hillsborough County man who died Sunday was 80 years of age or older and connected to a long-term care facility.

The state reported 35 new positive test results of the new coronavirus with the polymerase chain reaction tests showing a positivity rate of 0.4 percent. Thirty of the new cases were tested via PCR tests while five were antigen tests.

Of the new cases, one was a child while 21 were male. Seven live in Rockingham County, six live in Nashua, four live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, and two live in Merrimack County.

None of the new positive cases required hospitalization and only one had no identified risk factors.

Nearly 8,700 people have caught COVID-19 since March while 282,659 people have been tested and 465,878 PCR tests administered. On Sunday, 6,361 specimens were collected while results are pending for 1,207 tests.

About 2,750 people are under public health monitoring.

According to the latest data dashboard information, Nashua now has more cases than any other community in the state — 73. Bedford has 46 positive cases while Merrimack has 17 and Windham has 12. Salem has nine cases, Concord has eight, and Londonderry has seven. Exeter has five cases. Amherst, Hampton, Milford, and Portsmouth all have between one and four cases while North Hampton has no active cases.

A handful of K-12 schools reported new cases during the past couple of days: The Epping Elementary School has its first case while the Griffin Memorial School in Litchfield has a new infection and another active case. Merrimack High School has another active case — bringing its active count to four.

There are 28 active cases in K-12 schools in New Hampshire.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19
The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.
Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs to stay home and not go out into public places.

  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic and underlying health conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.

  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.

  • Employers should work from home as much

Another Elderly Man Has Died In New Hampshire: COVID-19 Update

CONCORD, NH — Another elderly man has died due to complications from or due to COVID-19, according to state health officials.

The State Joint Information Center reported Sunday that the man was 60 years of age or older and lived in Hillsborough County.

“We offer our sympathies to the family and friends,” the state said.

Officials also announced 53 new positive test results including six children. Twenty-nine of the new test results were males. Sixteen of the new positive test results live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, 11 reside in Rockingham County, nine live in Nashua, and five live in Merrimack Count.

The state reported no new hospitalizations with 23 currently receiving more extensive care. Six of the new cases had no identified risk factors — meaning they have not traveled, have not had contact with a confirmed case, and are not associated with an outbreak setting.

The new cases bring the state’s count to 8.645 with 7,710 recovering from the virus — about 89 percent.

The state said Sunday that limited information was available due to “a technical update impacting the reporting of lab data.” Because of that, “the percent positive calculation is not included” in the data but information will be posted later and will resume in daily updates moving forward.

About 2,750 people are under public health monitoring by state health officials.

School Data Dashboard Information

Another large New Hampshire city moved into the “substantial” community level transmission metric while another moved out.

According to the state’s school data dashboard, Nashua has entered into the substantial category — due to having 100.7 cases per 100,000 people during the past two weeks. Manchester was listed as substantial Saturday but moved out of the category Sunday. Manchester, Hillsborough County, and Strafford County are in the “moderate” category while the rest of the state is still in the minimal category.

Other data was not updated on the state’s dashboards Sunday.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs to stay home and not go out into public places.

  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic and underlying health conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.

  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.

  • Employers should work from home as much as possible.

  • There is increasing evidence that the virus can survive for hours or possibly days

500 Active Cases Of COVID-19 In New Hampshire

CONCORD, NH — The state of New Hampshire has more active cases of COVID-19 than it has seen since late July after reporting 66 new positive test results Saturday.

Of the new positive test results, eight were children and 35 were male with 51 testing positive via polymerase chain reaction tests and 15 testing positive by the new antigen test. Nineteen of the new cases live in Nashua, 12 in Manchester, nine reside in Merrimack County, and eight live in both Rockingham County and Hillsborough County outside of Nashua and Manchester.

The state said there were 500 current positive cases of the coronavirus in New Hampshire — the most since July 26 when there were 589 active cases with 8,597 accumulative cases and 7,655 recovered or about 89 percent.

Seventeen people remain hospitalized while 14 of the new patients have no identified risk factors.

The state collected 8,671 PCR specimens Friday and upgraded Thursday’s numbers to 8,170. Another 607 are pending meaning the positive test result rate is very low: 0.6 percent. Nearly 280,000 Granite Staters have been tested for the coronavirus while 461,000 PCR tests have been administered.

The city of Manchester has moved into a “substantial” community level transmission metric on the state’s school data dashboard. This means the city may move into a different form of learning in schools due to breaking the 103 per 100,000 new case metric during the past two weeks — even if only a handful of those cases were in a school setting.

In some circumstances, schools may want to take “a more restrictive approach than what is suggested,” depending on the level of community transmission and the level of school impact, the state said in September before schools opened. Shifts to remote learning from in-person, as an example, could be at least two weeks or potentially longer.

According to the school data dashboard, New Hampshire has 33 active cases in K-12 schools including new cases reported including a second case at Waterville Valley Elementary School; another new case at the Riddle Brook Elementary School in Bedford; two new cases at Merrimack High School, bringing the school to five active cases, the most in the state; a first case at Londonderry Senior High School; and a new case at the Golden Brook Elementary School in Windham.

Exeter High School is also reported its first case a few days ago but that case has since recovered from the virus.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told

More Than 270K Tested For COVID-19 In New Hampshire: Data Update

CONCORD, NH — State health officials reported 28 new positive test results Tuesday including two children.

The state said 52 percent of the new cases were male while 13 reside in Rockingham County, two live in Nashua, two live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, and one live Merrimack County.

The state has 8,233 confirmed positive tests since March with nearly 7,500 recovering from the virus.

One of the new positive tests required hospitalization while five had no identified risk factors meaning they had not traveled recently or been in contact with confirmed COVID-19 cases. Only 13 people remain hospitalized.

According to the state, 270,204 people have been tested for the virus after 5,764 specimens were gathered Monday. The state also reported 438,972 polymerase chain reaction tests have been performed in New Hampshire.

Approximately 2,725 people are under public health monitoring.

More School Infections Reported

The health department’s data dashboard reported a handful of new cases in New Hampshire.

Henry Wilson Memorial School in Litchfield reported a new case Monday bringing the school to two active cases and a recovered case. One of the two cases at Hopkinton High School has recovered. Merrimack High School also reported its third case Tuesday. North Londonderry Elementary School also reported its first case Tuesday. The Riddle Brook Elementary School in Bedford, which had two recovered cases, reported a new active case this week. Weston Elementary School in Manchester also reported its first case Monday.

Cases At Colleges Recover

A number of colleges have reported recovered cases of COVID-19.

Colby Sawyer College still has an active case while Dartmouth College has one active case and five recovered cases. Franklin Pierce University has six positive infections and 10 recoveries. New England College has two active cases and five recovered cases while its Manchester campus has three recoveries. Keene State College has eight recoveries and a single active case. Nashua Community College also has a new positive test result as well as a single recovered case. Rivier University in Nashua has two recovered cases. At UNH School of Law, three students have active positive test results. University of New Hampshire has 108 recoveries and 37 active cases. Three students at the Manchester campus of the school have also tested positive.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs to stay home and not go out into public places.