Showing: 1 - 5 of 5 RESULTS

Trump trip to greet supporters outside hospital raises concerns

Washington — While he continues to receive treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed Medical Center, President Trump made a surprise trip out of the hospital on Sunday evening to greet well-wishers who have flocked to the medical facility, a move that came amid questions about the severity of his illness and the risk of infection to those around him.

Riding in the back of a black SUV and donning a mask, Mr. Trump was seen waving to his supporters during the brief jaunt, which he teased as a “little surprise” in a video on Twitter before departing the Maryland hospital. 

“It’s been a very interesting journey,” Mr. Trump said in his video. “I learned a lot about Covid.”

The president’s short trip prompted questions as to what precautions were taken to ensure the safety of Mr. Trump and those in the vehicle with him. Judd Deere, a White House spokesman, said Mr. Trump’s doctors approved the outing and “appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the president and all those supporting it, including PPE.”

Supporters Of President Trump Outside Walter Reed Medical Center
President Trump wears a protective mask while waving as he is driven in a motorcade past supporters outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, on Sunday, October 4, 2020.

Bloomberg/Getty Images


The president’s drive-by came hours after his medical team attempted to clear up confusion about his condition after providing limited — and conflicting — information Saturday. While his doctors said the president could be discharged for continued treatment at the White House as early as Monday, questions remain as to the severity of Mr. Trump’s health status, as his doctors revealed he was given a dose of dexamethasone, a steroid, on Saturday after two episodes in which his oxygen levels dropped.

Dexamethasone is recommended by the World Health Organization for COVID-19 patients who are “critically ill.” Mr. Trump also remains on the five-day course of remdesivir, which has been found to shorten recovery time for patients hospitalized with the coronavirus.

Source Article

Doctors slam Trump’s drive to greet supporters outside Walter Reed hospital

  • In a video posted via Twitter on Sunday, Trump said he would “pay a little surprise to some of the great patriots that we have out on the street.”
  • Shortly thereafter, the presidential motorcade drove by the perimeter of the Walter Reed National Medical Center, with Trump seen through the window of an SUV wearing a face covering and waving to supporters.
  • “Traveling in a car with several staff members while still in isolation also poses a risk of infecting those other exposed passengers. There was no obvious justification for this action,” Michael Baker, an epidemiologist at the University of Otago in Wellington, New Zealand, told CNBC via email.



a passenger seat of a car: US President Trump waves from the back of a car outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on Ocotber 4, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
US President Trump waves from the back of a car outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on Ocotber 4, 2020.

LONDON — President Donald Trump on Sunday briefly ventured outside Walter Reed hospital in a motorcade to greet cheering supporters, a move that doctors have condemned for flagrantly disregarding precautions designed to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Trump, 74, has released a series of videos over the weekend to try to reassure voters that he is recovering after testing positive for Covid-19.

“It has been a very interesting journey. I’ve learned a lot about Covid,” Trump said in a video posted via Twitter on Sunday. The president also suggested he would “pay a little surprise to some of the great patriots that we have out on the street.”

Shortly thereafter, the presidential motorcade drove by the perimeter of the Walter Reed National Medical Center, with Trump seen through the window of an SUV wearing a face covering and waving to supporters.

Trump has repeatedly downplayed the threat of the pandemic, criticizing Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden as recently as last week for wearing a protective mask, even as the virus has infected millions of people and resulted in the deaths of more than 200,000 Americans.

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary Presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die. For political theater,” James Phillips, doctor of emergency medicine at George Washington University, and an attending physician at Walter Reed hospital, said via Twitter on Sunday.

“Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity,” he said.

In a second tweet, Phillips added the risk of Covid-19 transmission inside the car was “as high as it gets outside of medical procedures,” saying the presidential SUV was not only bullet proof but hermetically sealed against chemical attack.

“The irresponsibility is astounding. My thoughts are with the Secret Service forced to play,” Phillips said.

In response to the criticism, White House spokesman Judd Deere told the Associated Press that Trump’s trip outside the hospital “was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.”

Deere added precautions were taken, including the use of personal protective equipment, to protect the president, White House officials and Secret Service

Trump criticized for leaving hospital to greet supporters

US President Donald Trump sparked an angry backlash from the medical community Sunday with a protocol-breaking visit to his supporters outside the hospital where he is being treated for the highly-infectious, potentially deadly new coronavirus.

He was masked as he waved from inside his bulletproof vehicle during the short trip outside Walter Reed military medical center near Washington, which appeared designed to take back the narrative on his improving health after a weekend of muddled messaging from his doctors.

But experts complained that the outing broke his own government’s public health guidelines requiring patients to isolate while they are in treatment and still shedding virus — and endangered his Secret Service protection.   

Trump, who has been repeatedly rebuked for flouting public health guidelines and spreading misinformation on the pandemic, said in a video that dropped on Twitter just before the appearance that he had “learned a lot about Covid” by “really going to school” as he has battled the virus.

But health experts took to the airwaves and social media to criticize the “stunt,” which they said demonstrated that he had learned nothing at all. 

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary Presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days,” said James Phillips, chief of disaster medicine at George Washington University.

“They might get sick. They may die. For political theater. Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity.”

White House spokesman Judd Deere said “appropriate” precautions had been taken to protect Trump and his support staff, including protective gear. 

“The movement was cleared by the medical team as safe to do,” he added.

But Zeke Emanuel, chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania and regular TV pundit, described the appearance as “shameful.”

“Making his Secret Service agents drive with a COVID-19 patient, with windows up no less, put them needlessly at risk for infection. And for what? A PR stunt,” he tweeted.

– Confused messaging –

The episode came hours after a briefing by Trump’s medical team, who said he had “continued to improve” and could be returned to the White House, which has the facilities to treat and isolate the president, as early as Monday.

The president was flown to Walter Reed with a high fever on Friday after a “rapid progression” of his illness, with his oxygen levels dropping worryingly low, Trump’s physician Sean Conley said in a Sunday briefing.

Health experts have complained that the messaging from the administration — and particularly Trump’s medical team — has caused widespread confusion.

Conley admitted Sunday that he had kept from the public the fact that the president had been given extra oxygen, in a bid to reflect an “upbeat attitude.”

And he gave a rosy account of Trump’s progress Saturday only for White House chief of staff Mark Meadows to tell reporters immediately that Trump’s condition had been “very concerning” and that he was “still not

Infectious Trump briefly leaves Walter Reed to greet fans as confusion continues over his health

Adding to the confusion about his status, Trump briefly left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda to wave to supporters from a motorcade, after releasing a video on Twitter thanking people who had gathered outside the facility.

“We’re getting great reports from the doctors,” Trump said in the video before promising a “little surprise” to his supporters. “It’s been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about covid.”

At a news conference earlier Sunday, Trump’s medical team tried to clear up muddled picture it had created the previous day when White House doctor Sean Conley falsely suggested that Trump had not been given supplemental oxygen.

But Conley continued to evade directly answering specific questions about Trump’s health Sunday, even as he revealed that the president had been given dexamethasone, a steroid that is typically reserved for severely ill coronavirus patients needing oxygen. Conley openly admitted to withholding truthful information about Trump’s plummeting blood-oxygen levels Friday, indicating he did so to put a positive spin on the president’s improving condition.

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, that his course of illness, has had,” Conley said Sunday, explaining why he told reporters Saturday that Trump had not been given oxygen Friday. “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction. And in doing so, you know, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true.”

Conley also announced that Trump’s oxygen levels had dropped again on Saturday. Asked if Trump had been administered supplemental oxygen as a result, Conley said that he did not know and would have to check with the nursing staff.

The episode continued what has been a days-long torrent of falsehoods, obfuscation, evasion, misdirection and imprecision from those surrounding Trump as he faces the greatest threat to a president’s health in decades. From the chief White House doctor to the president’s chief of staff, the inability to provide clear, direct and consistent information about Trump’s condition has been widespread since the coronavirus began rapidly circulating in the West Wing.

Trump, his doctors and White House aides sought to portray him as improving and largely unencumbered by the virus that has killed more than 209,000 Americans. White House aides emphasized that Trump was continuing to work while at Walter Reed, casting him as a triumphant warrior.

In the Twitter video, Trump said that he has spent part of his time at Walter Reed visiting wounded warriors and first responders without providing details about how those patients were protected against the president infecting them with covid-19. He also indicated that he understood the coronavirus better than medical experts after having contracted it.

“I learned it by really going to school — this is the real school. This isn’t the let’s-read-the-book school,” he said. “And I get it, and I understand it.”

The president donned a mask as he waved to a crowd of fans from inside a

Trump leaves hospital briefly to greet supporters outside

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump declared, “I get it,” in a message to the nation Sunday evening before briefly leaving the hospital to greet cheering supporters from his motorcade, a surprising move that suggested that his health — and his understanding of the coronavirus — may be improving.

Hours earlier, the president’s medical team confirmed that his blood oxygen level dropped suddenly twice in recent days. But they also said he could be discharged as early as Monday.

“It’s been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID,” Trump said, standing in his hospital room in a video posted on social media. “I learned it by really going to school.”

He added, “I get it, and I understand it.”

At least one medical professional inside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump has been hospitalized since Friday evening, questioned whether Trump had really learned anything.

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die. For political theater. Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity,” Dr. James P. Phillips, an attending physician at Walter Reed, tweeted.

Earlier in the day, Trump’s doctors revealed they gave the president a steroid treatment typically only recommended for the very sick. But they sidestepped questions about exactly when Trump’s blood oxygen dropped — an episode they neglected to mention in multiple statements the day before — or whether lung scans showed any damage.

It was the second straight day of confusion and obfuscation from a White House already suffering from a credibility crisis. And it raised questions about whether the doctors treating the president were sharing accurate, timely information with the American public about the severity of him condition.


Pressed about conflicting information he and the White House released on Saturday, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley acknowledged that he had tried to present a rosy description of the president’s condition.

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude of the team, that the president, that his course of illness has had. Didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction,” Conley said. “And in doing so, came off like we’re trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true. The fact of the matter is that he’s doing really well.”

The briefing outside the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center lasted just 10 minutes.

Medical experts said Conley’s revelations raised new questions about how ill the president was and are hard to square with the doctor’s upbeat assessment and talk of a discharge.

“There’s a little bit of a disconnect,” said Dr. Steven Shapiro, chief medical and scientific officer at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Blood oxygen saturation is a key health marker for COVID-19