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Trump suggests he may hold weekend rallies in Florida, Pennsylvania after receiving green light from doctor

President Trump told Fox News’ Sean Hannity in an exclusive interview Thursday that his campaign is trying to make last-minute arrangements for holding weekend rallies in Florida and Pennsylvania after White House physician Dr. Sean Conley cleared him for public engagements earlier in the day.

“I think I’m going to try doing a rally on Saturday night if we have enough time to put it together,” Trump said on “Hannity”.

WH DR: TRUMP CAN RETURN TO PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTS THIS WEEKEND

“We want to do a rally probably in Florida on Saturday night. I might come back and do one in Pennsylvania the following night,” he said, adding that “it’s incredible what’s going on. I feel so good.”

Dr. Conley sent out a memorandum Thursday evening stating that Trump will be able to return to public engagements this weekend, noting that Saturday will mark ten days since he was first diagnosed with the coronavirus.

Conely’s memo stated that Trump has responded “extremely well to treatment” and added there is no sign of “adverse therapeutic effects.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says people “with mild to moderate COVID-19 remain infectious no longer than 10 days after symptom onset. People with more severe symptoms can remain infectious for longer.”

TRUMP ACKNOWLEDGES HE WAS ‘VERY SICK’ WHEN HE WAS HOSPITALIZED FOR COVID 

Trump said he will “probably” take a test on Friday to be sure of a negative result, but claimed his doctors “found very little infection or virus, if any,” in a previous unspecified test.

“I don’t know if they found any,” he said. “I didn’t go into it greatly with the doctors. We have these great doctors at Walter Reed, and you do rely on them, they are really fantastic talents and they came in from Johns Hopkins also and other places.

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Trump said he was being closely monitored, telling Hannity that he “never saw so many doctors looking over me.

“I think I’m the most analyzed human being in the world right now,” he said.

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Mexico, Plagued by Cartel Wars, on Cusp of Legal Cannabis ‘Green Rush’ | World News

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – For Guillermo Nieto, a Mexican businessman who grew up smoking pot, the cannabis greenhouse on his family’s vast farmlands in Guanajuato state is part of a bigger dream. One that involves deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies.

Nieto and several Mexican businessmen have spent years positioning themselves for a time when the country opens up what would be the world’s biggest legal cannabis market in terms of population, where the drug can be lawfully cultivated and sold.

Mexico finally outlined rules in July covering cannabis for medical use, and the sign-off is expected in coming weeks.

A bigger prize may also be close for Nieto and foreign companies; Senate majority leader Ricardo Monreal told Reuters he expected a law to be passed before December for recreational use of the drug, allowing regulated private firms to sell it to the public.

“It’s going to generate a market,” said Nieto, wearing a smart blue shirt, blazer, and bright marijuana-leaf print yellow socks. “We are expecting to create jobs and revenue for the government. We think it could really help our economy.”

Indeed the legal cannabis industry is already a multi-billion-dollar global trade, and some big players, including Canada’s Canopy Growth and The Green Organic Dutchman, and a unit of California-based Medical Marijuana Inc, told Reuters they were eager to tap the new Mexican market.

Business aside, Nieto says the new regulations will have a profound social impact on the conservative nation of 126 million people, where drugs are a sensitive subject due to a long and painful history of violence perpetuated by feuding cartels.

“The first thing that will happen is that no Mexican will die or go to jail because of this plant,” Nieto said.

“With that, everyone wins.”

Dario Contreras Sanchez aims to set up a business making products like soaps and pain-relieving oils from cannabis that he would grow legally near his family’s hacienda in Durango state, where the powerful Sinaloa Cartel has held sway for decades.

He believes farmers near him who cultivate the plant for narcos would want to sell their produce lawfully – if the government permits them.

“Most of the people want to work legally,” said Contreras Sanchez, whose sister married into the family of former Mexican drug lord Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

However Mexicans are by no means unified on this issue.

While a growing cannabis industry promises to be a money-spinner, it faces resistance from campaigners who are worried that regulations for both medical and non-medical cannabis will heavily favor big, often foreign corporations.

They fear legislation will shut out small family producers and fail to offer a path to legalization for many farmers who make a living by feeding Mexico’s illegal narcotics trade.

The initial regulations covering medical use permit entrepreneurs such as Nieto to grow marijuana on behalf of pharmaceutical companies and allows foreign businesses to import medical cannabis products into the country.

However Mexico’s Supreme Court, which has effectively legalized cannabis by ruling prohibition is unconstitutional, has given the government

Mexico, plagued by cartel wars, on cusp of legal cannabis ‘green rush’

By Drazen Jorgic

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – For Guillermo Nieto, a Mexican businessman who grew up smoking pot, the cannabis greenhouse on his family’s vast farmlands in Guanajuato state is part of a bigger dream. One that involves deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies.

Nieto and several Mexican businessmen have spent years positioning themselves for a time when the country opens up what would be the world’s biggest legal cannabis market in terms of population, where the drug can be lawfully cultivated and sold.

Mexico finally outlined rules in July covering cannabis for medical use, and the sign-off is expected in coming weeks.

A bigger prize may also be close for Nieto and foreign companies; Senate majority leader Ricardo Monreal told Reuters he expected a law to be passed before December for recreational use of the drug, allowing regulated private firms to sell it to the public.

“It’s going to generate a market,” said Nieto, wearing a smart blue shirt, blazer, and bright marijuana-leaf print yellow socks. “We are expecting to create jobs and revenue for the government. We think it could really help our economy.”

Indeed the legal cannabis industry is already a multi-billion-dollar global trade, and some big players, including Canada’s Canopy Growth and The Green Organic Dutchman, and a unit of California-based Medical Marijuana Inc, told Reuters they were eager to tap the new Mexican market.

Business aside, Nieto says the new regulations will have a profound social impact on the conservative nation of 126 million people, where drugs are a sensitive subject due to a long and painful history of violence perpetuated by feuding cartels.

“The first thing that will happen is that no Mexican will die or go to jail because of this plant,” Nieto said.

“With that, everyone wins.”

Dario Contreras Sanchez aims to set up a business making products like soaps and pain-relieving oils from cannabis that he would grow legally near his family’s hacienda in Durango state, where the powerful Sinaloa Cartel has held sway for decades.

He believes farmers near him who cultivate the plant for narcos would want to sell their produce lawfully – if the government permits them.

“Most of the people want to work legally,” said Contreras Sanchez, whose sister married into the family of former Mexican drug lord Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

However Mexicans are by no means unified on this issue.

While a growing cannabis industry promises to be a money-spinner, it faces resistance from campaigners who are worried that regulations for both medical and non-medical cannabis will heavily favor big, often foreign corporations.

They fear legislation will shut out small family producers and fail to offer a path to legalization for many farmers who make a living by feeding Mexico’s illegal narcotics trade.

‘GREEN RUSH’ FRONTIER

The initial regulations covering medical use permit entrepreneurs such as Nieto to grow marijuana on behalf of pharmaceutical companies and allows foreign businesses to import medical cannabis products into the country.

However Mexico’s Supreme Court, which has effectively legalized cannabis by

Research gives green light for migraine relief

A pilot study suggests that exposure to green light of a particular wavelength and brightness may be as effective as drugs in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine.

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, about 12% of people in the United States experience migraine.

The condition involves moderate-to-severe headaches, which often accompany debilitating symptoms, such as visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and extreme sensitivity to sound and light.

Affected individuals frequently report having a lower quality of life and needing to take time off work as a result of their condition. Research suggests that they are more likely to use and overuse pain relief medications, including opioids.

Some people do not get adequate pain control from drugs or experience unpleasant side effects when they take them. Finding alternative therapies to replace or complement these treatments is, therefore, a priority.

One possibility is light therapy. Previous research by doctors at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson found that green light had pain-relieving effects in rats.

The same team has now conducted the first clinical study of green light as a preventive therapy for migraine, with promising results.

“As a physician, this is really exciting,” says lead author Dr. Mohab Ibrahim, an associate professor at the college and director of its Chronic Pain Management Clinic. “Now, I have another tool in my toolbox to treat one of the most difficult neurological conditions — migraine.”

The researchers report their study in Cephalalgia, the journal of the International Headache Society.

The researchers recruited 29 people, seven of whom had episodic migraine (defined as up to 14 headache days per month), while 22 had chronic migraine (15 or more headache days per month for 3 or more months). All of the participants were unsatisfied with their current treatment.

Initially, for 10 weeks, the participants spent 1–2 hours daily at home in an otherwise dark room lit by a white LED (light-emitting diode) strip. The white lighting served as a control condition.

A “washout period” of 2 weeks without any light treatment followed.

Finally, for a further 10 weeks, all 29 individuals spent 1–2 hours daily with an LED strip emitting green light with a wavelength of about 525 nanometers and the same brightness as the white light.

The researchers encouraged the participants to stay awake during the light treatment and do things that required no additional lighting, such as reading a book, listening to music, or doing exercise.

Throughout the study, each participant filled out questionnaires reporting the number of headaches that they experienced and their intensity. In addition, they answered questions relating to quality of life, such as their ability to work and to fall and stay asleep.

Overall, the green light treatment was associated with a significant decrease in the frequency of headaches, from an average of 18.4 days per month before the treatment to 7.4 days per month afterward (a reduction of about 60%).

Among those with episodic migraine, the number of headache days per month declined

15-minute coronavirus test gets the green light for a European rollout

Dr. Vincent Carrao draws blood from a patient for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test at Palisades Oral Surgery, in Fort Lee, New Jersey, U.S., June 15, 2020. Picture taken June 15, 2020.

Brendan McDermid | Reuters

A test to detect Covid-19 that can be done at the point of care and gives results in 15 minutes has been given the greenlight in Europe, according to its maker Becton Dickinson.

The test should be commercially available in Europe by the end of October, the diagnostics specialist said Wednesday, as it announced its antigen test had been granted a “CE mark” in Europe, meaning it conforms with health, safety, and environmental protection standards for products sold within the region.

The new test delivers results in 15 minutes on a small, portable instrument, BD said in a statement Wednesday, adding that this is a “critical improvement in turnaround time for Covid-19 diagnostics, because it provides real-time results and enables decision-making while the patient is still onsite.”

“The addition of a truly portable, point-of-care test that can deliver results while the patient waits will be welcomed by health care providers and patients alike to help protect against additional waves of Covid-19,” Roland Goette, president of BD EMEA, remarked. 

In July, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted emergency use authorization to the company’s rapid antigen test, that works by looking for proteins that can be found on or inside the Covid-19 virus.

It has been widely reported that while antigen tests can be carried out faster than molecular diagnostic tests which are conducted in laboratories, they are generally less accurate.

Becton Dickinson says that clinical studies performed at more than 20 sites across the U.S. demonstrated that the test is capable of achieving 84% sensitivity (a measure of how well it correctly identifies infections) and 100% specificity (how well it correctly identifies negative tests) but the U.S. FDA recommends that negative test results be confirmed by a molecular method to confirm the result.

BD said it is leveraging its global manufacturing network and scale to produce 8 million Covid-19 antigen tests per month by October and expects to produce 12 million tests per month by March 2021.

It is by no means alone in developing a rapid antigen test for the virus, with Roche announcing earlier in September that its own 15-minute antigen test had received the CE mark and German diagnostic test maker Qiagen also announcing earlier this month that it planned to launch a 15-minute antigen test.

In mid-September it was reported that BD was looking into reports from nursing homes that its rapid Covid-19 testing equipment was producing false positive results in some cases.

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