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CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta puts Trump’s odds of surviving COVID-19 at ‘greater than 90 percent’

President Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, and “obviously, given the president’s age and his pre-existing illnesses, he’s going to be at increased risk from this disease,” CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta said on Friday morning’s New Day. “Still, the odds are very much in his favor … greater than 90 percent, 95 percent chance that he will get through this.”

We know that his age, 244 pounds of weight, heart disease, and cholesterol level put Trump at higher risk, Gupta said. “When you’re at his age, 65 to 74, it’s about a five times greater likelihood that somebody will be hospitalized for this, as compared to somebody younger.” But we don’t know lots of other important information, he added, like whether he has symptoms or when he was infected, and “we still don’t have full vision on his past medical history,” including the story behind “that strange visit to Walter Reed back in November.”

Either way, Trump now has to isolate — not quarantine, isolate — for up to 14 days now, Gupta advised. and everyone he’s been in contact with will “need to be quarantined, not just tested.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson “kept on working for several days and then it got worse over time,” George Stephanopoulos said on Friday’s Good Morning America. ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton said Trump will likely avoid the worst but not get off scot free: “About 80 percent of people infected with COVID-19 do not require hospitalization. That doesn’t mean, though, that their disease course will be mild. It just means that they can be managed in a home environment. And we also know that 45 percent of those infected — up to 45 percent — will show no symptoms.”

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Late night hosts have a pretty good idea why Trump shockingly refuses to condemn white supremacists
Trump flew to New Jersey for a fundraiser, reportedly after learning Hope Hicks had COVID-19 symptoms

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Irregular periods linked to a greater risk of an early death

A team of mostly US-based researchers found that women who reported always having irregular menstrual cycles experienced higher mortality rates than women who reported very regular cycles in the same age ranges. The study took into account other potentially influential factors, such as age, weight, lifestyle, contraceptives and family medical history.

The study assessed 79,505 women with no history of cardiovascular disease, cancer or diabetes. The women reported the usual length and regularity of their menstrual cycles at three different points: between the ages of 14 to 17, 18 to 22, and 29 to 46 years. The researchers kept track of their health over a 24-year period.

“This study is a real step forward in closing the data gap that exists in women’s health. It raises many interesting research questions and areas of future study,” Dr. Jacqueline Maybin, a senior research fellow and consultant gynecologist at the University of Edinburgh’s MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, told the Science Media Centre in London.

“These data will encourage future interrogation of menstrual symptoms and pathologies as an indicator of long-term health outcomes and may provide an early opportunity to implement preventative strategies to improve women’s health across the lifespan,” said Maybin, who wasn’t involved in the research.

Irregular and long menstrual cycles have been associated with a higher risk of major chronic diseases including ovarian cancer, coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and mental health problems, the study said.

Fertility apps can be 'misleading' for women, review finds

In particular, the research, which published in the BMJ medical journal Wednesday, found that women who reported that their usual cycle length was 40 days or more at ages 18 to 22 years and 29 to 46 years were more likely to die prematurely — defined as before the age of 70 — than women who reported a usual cycle length of 26 to 31 days in the same age ranges.

The links were strongest for deaths related to cardiovascular disease than for cancer or death from other causes.

The authors were from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Michigan State University and Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China.

No cause for alarm

Experts said that women who experience irregular or long menstrual cycles shouldn’t be alarmed by the findings of the study. Maybin said it’s important to remember that irregular menstruation is likely a symptom, not a diagnosis.

“A specific underlying cause of irregular menstruation may increase the risk of premature death, rather than the irregular bleeding, per se. We already know that women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of irregular periods, have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer of the womb. It is important that women with PCOS speak to their doctor to reduce these risks,” she said.

Just say it: Yes, I'm menstruating

The study was observational and can only establish a correlation, not a causal link, between an irregular or long menstrual cycle and premature death. Other unmeasured factors could have influenced the results.

Maybin noted that the participants in