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Porter dentist offers free oral cancer screenings for firefighters

As a thank you to local first responders, Porter Family Dentistry is offering free oral cancer screenings to firefighters in Montgomery County for the next several weeks.

The screenings will be held on Fridays when the office is usually closed so that firefighters don’t have to wait.

In 2016, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health published a multi-year study of cancer rates in firefighters, and the findings showed that firefighters had a higher number of cancer diagnoses and cancer-related deaths than the general U.S. population. Among the cancers found in the sample of nearly 30,000 firefighters, those most often found were digestive, oral, respiratory, and urinary cancers.

In recent months, firefighters across the country have been traveling to areas, like California, that their help is needed. Dr. Mustafa Yamani of Porter Family Dentistry went to school in California and has fond memories of the nature and beauty of the state.

“It’s such a beautiful place, it’s really sad reading all of the stuff in the news that’s going on there,” Yamani said. “From all around the country they (the firefighters) come together and they provide this service. It’s just amazing what they’re doing and I really appreciate that. I just want to do something for them.”


The generous act of the firefighters inspired him to give back, and since oral cancer screenings are a service his office already offers he decided to give them to firefighters for free.

While this is the first year that the dental office has offered free screenings, Yamani and his wife Sabrina, who is the office manager, plan on making it an annual thing. The trials of 2020 also helped them decide to give back.

“Things seem to be going from bad to worse, to even worse, and it just doesn’t seem to be stopping for our first responders,” Sabrina said. “They’re just being hit with things one after the other.”

Sabrina started by reaching out to fire departments in the east past of Montgomery County to let them know about the opportunity and the response was immediate and positive. Already, the dental office has screenings set up with local firefighters.

Because firefighters are at a higher risk of developing cancer, many departments take an aggressive approach to screenings and check-ups. Early detection is vital. Such is the approach of the East Montgomery County Fire Department where firefighters undergo a National Fire Protection Agency physicals annually.

“It’s huge to us,” Eran Denzler, captain and PIO with the department, said of being able to get the oral screenings for free. “It’s a great show of appreciation for what we do and the risks that we take. Every day we go and put our lives on the line for the community, and for them to give back and worry about our safety is something we’re not used to but it’s much appreciated.”

The department averages around one to two structure fires a week,

Minimally invasive procedure may free Type 2 diabetics from insulin

A small study suggests that a new procedure that treats part of the intestine just beyond the stomach may allow people with type 2 diabetes to safely stop taking insulin.

The procedure — which resurfaces the duodenum — was combined with a popular kind of diabetes medication called GLP-1 receptor agonists — such as Victoza, Trulicity, Ozempic — and counseling on lifestyle factors, such as nutrition and physical activity.

Six months after treatments began, three-quarters of participants taking insulin no longer needed it. The amount of fat stored in their livers dropped from 8% to less than 5%.

“The duodenum harbors a broad potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and this combination treatment could be a game-changing approach in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome,” said lead researcher Dr. Suzanne Meiring, of Amsterdam University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

This preliminary study included 16 patients, all of whom underwent Duodenal Mucosal Resurfacing, or DMR. There was no placebo group or medication-only group for comparison. The study was funded by Fractyl Laboratories, which developed the procedure.

DMR is a minimally invasive procedure that relies on an endoscope — a narrow, flexible tube containing a light and video camera that lets your doctor see inside the body. The endoscope may also carry special tools for treatment. The tube is threaded down the throat into the digestive system.

In DMR, the endoscope is guided to the duodenum, where doctors then resurface, or ablate, its lining. Meiring said it’s not yet clear why the procedure works.

“We think the effects result from a combination of changes that occur when the duodenal mucosa is ablated and rejuvenated,” she said. “We think that changes in hormonal signaling, including the gut hormone GLP-1, bile acid compositions and the microbiome play an important role.”

The 16 participants had type 2 diabetes for an average 11 years. On average, they had been on insulin just under three years. None had taken a GLP-1 receptor agonist before the study.

At the outset, their average A1C levels — an estimate of blood sugar levels over two to three months — were under 8%. After 12 months, the average fell to 6.7%. For most adults, the American Diabetes Association recommends aiming for an A1C below 7%.

After the DMR procedure, patients were given a specific diet for two weeks. After that, they began taking the GLP-1 receptor agonist medication.

Meiring said researchers added the drug because it also targets the duodenum. They hoped it would boost the effects of DMR, “possibly even causing a synergistic effect,” she said.

She said she doesn’t think the positive effects in this study stem from just the drug treatment. Other studies have shown that about 10% of people who start GLP-1 therapy are able to get off insulin, Meiring said. In this study, 75% of those taking insulin were able to stop.

Participants who weren’t insulin-free after 12 months needed only about half the insulin they required before the procedure.

Free Fitness at Canalside offerings extended through end of 2020

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Looking for a way to stay in shape now that the changing weather means more time spent indoors?

BlueCross BlueShield in partnership with the Buffalo Waterfront says they are extending the popular Free Fitness at Canalside virtual exercise classes through the end of the year. The offerings will also include a new dance fitness series.

A new Funday Fitness class will be available every week on the Buffalo Waterfront website through December 19. Participants can take part in virtual up beat dance routines choreographed to the latest hits.

“As our community continues to adapt our routines in every way, BlueCross BlueShield is pleased to provide free options for individuals to enhance their overall health and wellbeing,” said Julie R. Snyder, Senior Vice President, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York. “BlueCross BlueShield’s free virtual classes will give individuals a healthy outlet, which is especially important this year and as the colder weather comes our way.” 

The free classes are open to everyone regardless of fitness level or experience. The virtual videos go live every Monday at 11 a.m. and are taped using social distancing guidelines. The video will stay active for a week on the Buffalo Waterfront website until the next class is posted.

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Trump claims he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was ready to return to the campaign trail despite unanswered questions about his health on the eve of a Florida rally meant to kick off the stretch run before Election Day.

His impending return comes after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it. The president insisted he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and added to the unknowns about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures.” “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.


But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

His return to full-fledged rallies will be in Florida on Monday, a comeback that comes with the president facing stubborn deficits in the polls. The Trump campaign and White House has not indicated that any additional safety measures will be taken to prevent the transmission of the virus among those traveling on Air Force One, at the event site or at rallies scheduled for Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week.

Campaign officials have signaled that Trump will be traveling nearly every day the rest of the campaign, and sometimes making more than one stop, an aggressive schedule for a 74-year-old who was hospitalized just days ago.

On Sunday, Trump asserted in a tweet that he had “total and complete sign off from White House Doctors” to fully return to the campaign trail, insisting he can no longer spread the disease to others and was impervious to getting sick again.

That’s far from certain, and Twitter later flagged his tweet with a fact-check warning.

While there’s evidence that reinfection in unlikely for at least three months even for those with a mild case of COVID-19, very few diseases leave people completely immune for life. Antibodies are only one piece of the body’s defenses, and they naturally wane over time.

“Certainly it’s presumptuous to say it’s a lifetime,” said Dr. Albert Ko, an infectious disease specialist and department chairman at the Yale School of Public Health.

As to whether Trump could still be

Trump Insists He’s Free of Virus, Ready for Campaign Trail | Political News

By JONATHAN LEMIRE, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was healthy enough to return to the campaign trail, a day after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

Trump, who was poised Monday to host his first rally after his COVID-19 diagnosis, declared he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and comes amid a series of outstanding questions about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News. “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.

But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

The memo followed Trump’s first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus at a military hospital. Hundreds of people gathered Saturday afternoon on the South Lawn for a Trump address on his support for law enforcement from a White House balcony.

Trump took off a mask moments after he emerged on the balcony to address the crowd on the lawn below, his first step back onto the public stage with just more than three weeks to go until Election Day. He flouted, once more, the safety recommendations of his own government days after acknowledging that he was on the brink of “bad things” from the virus and claiming that his bout with the illness brought him a better understanding of it.

His return was a brief one. With bandages visible on his hands, likely from an intravenous injection, Trump spoke for 18 minutes, far less than his normal hour-plus rallies. He appeared healthy, if perhaps a little hoarse, as he delivered what was, for all intents and purposes, a short version of his campaign speech despite the executive mansion setting.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, adding that he was thankful for their good wishes and prayers as he recovered. He then declared that the pandemic, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans, was “disappearing” even though he is still recovering from the virus.

In either an act of defiance or simply tempting fate, officials organized the event just steps from the

Trump insists he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was healthy enough to return to the campaign trail, a day after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

Trump, who was poised Monday to host his first rally after his COVID-19 diagnosis, declared he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and comes amid a series of outstanding questions about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News. “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”


In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.

But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

The memo followed Trump’s first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus at a military hospital. Hundreds of people gathered Saturday afternoon on the South Lawn for a Trump address on his support for law enforcement from a White House balcony.

Trump took off a mask moments after he emerged on the balcony to address the crowd on the lawn below, his first step back onto the public stage with just more than three weeks to go until Election Day. He flouted, once more, the safety recommendations of his own government days after acknowledging that he was on the brink of “bad things” from the virus and claiming that his bout with the illness brought him a better understanding of it.

His return was a brief one. With bandages visible on his hands, likely from an intravenous injection, Trump spoke for 18 minutes, far less than his normal hour-plus rallies. He appeared healthy, if perhaps a little hoarse, as he delivered what was, for all intents and purposes, a short version of his campaign speech despite the executive mansion setting.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, adding that he was thankful for their good wishes and prayers as he recovered. He then declared that the pandemic, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans, was “disappearing” even though he is still recovering from the virus.

In either an act of defiance or simply tempting fate, officials organized the event just steps from the Rose Garden, where exactly two weeks ago the

Trump says he is ‘medication free’ in an interview with Fox News.

President Trump, in his first televised interview since he announced that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, said Friday night that he was “medication free” and back to normal, a week after he was hospitalized after having trouble breathing.

“I feel very strong,” he said.

In the interview with Dr. Marc Siegel on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Fox News, Mr. Trump claimed that he went to Walter National Reed Military Medical Center last Friday because he “didn’t feel strong.” But the president denied that he had experienced any trouble breathing, despite multiple people close to the White House saying in interviews that he had, in fact, had trouble breathing and that doctors had given him supplemental oxygen at the White House before his transfer to the hospital.

Mr. Trump said that there had been congestion in his lungs and he lauded his CT scans, which he called “amazing.” He also said he had been tested on the day of the interview — a White House official said that it had been filmed earlier Friday — and claimed to be “either at the bottom of the scale or free” of the virus. He added that he was being tested “every couple of days.”

Mr. Trump said that he didn’t know the results of his most recent Covid test.

Credit…Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Siriusxm

“I didn’t feel strong,” he told Dr. Siegel, a Fox News contributor who joked that he was conducting a telemedicine appointment free of charge. “I didn’t have a problem with breathing, which a lot of people seemed to have. I had none of that. I didn’t feel very vital. I didn’t feel like the president of the United States should feel.”

Mr. Trump repeated his claim that he wanted to give all Americans for free an experimental antibody cocktail from Regeneron, which he credits with his quick recovery. He did not explain how he would do that when the drug does not yet have government approval.

“You would have sort of a sore throat, but I felt really very good after taking this for a period of time,” he said. “It’s a transfusion, not a shot. I’d like to send it to everybody.”

Regeneron’s treatment is a combination of two powerful antibodies that are believed to boost the immune response to the virus.

Of the steroid he had taken, dexamethasone, Mr. Trump said he had “tolerated it very well.”

When asked where he thought he had contracted the virus, Mr. Trump used the passive voice and took no responsibility for the spread of the virus after the White House announcement of the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court — a gathering that Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday qualified as a “super-spreader event.”

Mr. Trump said that as of eight hours before the taping, he was “medication free.”

On Friday, the White

‘I’m Either at the Bottom of the Scale or Free’

In his first on-camera interview since he tested positive for the coronavirus, President Donald Trump told Fox News he was confident that even though he had not received results from it, his retest for the disease showed that he was on the mend.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump at Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies in Morrisville, North Carolina on July 27, 2020. He has said he has been tested again for COVID-19 but has not got the results.


© JIM WATSON/Getty Images
President Donald Trump at Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies in Morrisville, North Carolina on July 27, 2020. He has said he has been tested again for COVID-19 but has not got the results.

Appearing remotely from the White House, his appearance on Tucker Carlson Tonight included questions and what was dubbed a medical evaluation of Dr. Marc Siegel.

The segment was introduced by Carlson who said that “by any measure, it’s been a remarkable turnaround,” and that after rumors that Trump had been “very sick” on Saturday, by Monday “he seemed essentially himself.”

After explaining that it was a White House film crew and not one from Fox News filming the president, Carlson threw to the pre-recorded segment in which Siegel started by asking the president how he felt.

Describing it as the “China virus,” Trump replied: “I feel really good, I feel very strong.”

When asked what the main symptoms were when he went into Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Trump said that he “didn’t have a problem with breathing, which a lot of people seem to have.

However, his personal physician, Sean Conley, had said that early on during treatment, the president had been given supplemental oxygen.

Trump continued: “I didn’t feel very vital, I didn’t feel like the president of the U.S. should feel.” He then said that when in hospital he “tired” but that “I got lucky with a certain medicine,” going on to say that after taking Regeneron, “within a period of 24 hours I felt very different.

“I think I could have left the hospital a lot earlier,” Trump said, before adding, “right now, I am medication free.”

Siegel asked: “I heard you said you were going to test again today, have you been retested?” Without revealing when the procedure had taken place, Trump replied: “I have been retested and I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet.”

If someone has a COVID-19 test in the hospital, they will usually get the result the same day, according to Medical News Today.

Trump continued: “But I’ve been retested and I know I’m either at the bottom of the scale or free” he added, although almost all Covid tests register only a binary positive or negative result, and even a small viral load would likely mean a positive test.

‘Get Out There’: Trump Removes Face Mask For Photo Op As He Returns To White House

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An unclear or inconclusive result means it’s not possible to say if you had coronavirus when the test was done, according to the NHS website.

On Saturday, Trump is expected to hold his first official public event since his coronavirus diagnosis at an event on the White House

Disneyland Resort Offers Free Coronavirus Testing To Cast Members

ANAHEIM, CA —They’re the people we see walking into Downtown Disney, the ones taking temperatures, reminding you to put on your mask or socially distance amid the coronavirus slow reopening of Disneyland Resort. Now, Disneyland is showing how they are protecting their workers by offering more testing.

On Friday, the theme park shared a new offering for cast members: a free and accessible method to test for coronavirus, a spokesperson for the park tells Patch.

Starting Oct. 26, through a partnership with Quest Labs, employees can request a coronavirus test from their own homes.

The program, increasing options for testing, is all part of the Disneyland Resort’s comprehensive approach to health and safety measures, according to Dr. Pamela Hymel, Chief Medical Officer for Disney Parks, Experiences and Products.

One week ago, the Walt Disney Co. alerted workers that 28,000 of their ranks would be laid off across the country due to the ongoing coronavirus shutdown. Though Orange County and the Disneyland Resort have attempted to work with Gov. Gavin Newsom to formulate a reopening guideline, those plans were tabled by Newsom’s office. Still, employees who work behind the scenes, at Downtown Disney, in offices, and remotely from home, all who remain employed can participate in this program, should they need to be tested.

“We have taken a robust science-based approach to responsibly reopening our parks and resorts across the globe,” Hymel wrote in a prepared statement. “Our comprehensive approach emphasizes a combination of health and safety measures to help reduce risk, and with that in mind, we have finalized a plan for all working cast members of the Disneyland Resort to have access to free, easily accessible testing options.”

See also:

Disneyland Resort Final Walt Disney Co. Property To Reopen

Disneyland Resort Reopening Guidelines Back To Drawing Board

28,000 Employees Laid Off At Disneyland, Walt Disney World

This article originally appeared on the Mission Viejo Patch

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The Daily 202: Trump tries frantically to make up lost ground with seniors, promising free medicine and checks

Other polls released over the last week show Biden leading among voters 65 and older, including in the battlegrounds of Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Pew’s survey was in the field from Wednesday, the day after the first presidential debate, through Monday, the day Trump checked himself out of Walter Reed after his three-night stay in the hospital. Pew’s unusually large sample size of 10,543 registered voters means smaller margins of error for subgroups, which allows for deeper analysis.

Trump and many of his top advisers see his weakness among seniors as an existential threat to his hopes for a second term, and the president is demanding that his aides use all the levers of the federal government to woo older voters who have drifted away during the final 25 days of the campaign.

The president tweeted a two-and-a-half minute video Thursday afternoon of himself speaking directly to seniors, whom he referred to as “MY FAVORITE PEOPLE IN THE WORLD.”

“I’m a senior,” the 74-year-old said to the camera. “I know you don’t know that. Nobody knows that. Maybe you don’t have to tell them, but I’m a senior.”

Trump said he was “very sick” when he went to the hospital, but the experimental antibody treatment he received helped him feel better immediately. He promised that he’s going to make sure that other seniors can also access the medicine he got by pushing the FDA to immediately authorize its emergency use. 

“They like to say ‘the vulnerable,’ but you’re the least vulnerable, but for this one thing, you are vulnerable. And so am I. But I want you to get the same care that I got,” Trump said. “You’re going to get the same medicine, you’re going to get it free, no charge, and we’re going to get it to you soon. … All free! … I do know what I’m doing. The seniors are going to be taken care of, and then everybody is going to be taken care of.”

Assuming the medication gets approved for wider use, doctors say there will not be enough doses to make it widely available and note that there are potentially significant side effects. Just as importantly, Trump cannot distribute any medicine free of charge unless he agrees to a coronavirus relief deal with Congress, something he has sent mixed messages about all week. Evan Hollander, a spokesman for the Democratic majority on the House Appropriations Committee, said Trump is lying: “Without new legislation, the Trump administration cannot make covid-19 treatment available for free.” 

About 4 in 5 of the 212,000 Americans killed by the coronavirus have been over the age of 65. This group is less antsy about getting workers back into offices or kids back into school. Many seniors have sacrificed a great deal, foregoing time with loved ones to avoid potential exposure to a virus they know is more likely to kill them.

After temporarily halting negative ads against Trump while he was hospitalized, the Biden campaign unveiled several new