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Figs, maker of scrubs, apologizes for ‘insensitive’ ad targeting osteopathic doctors

Figs, a medical apparel company known for stylish scrubs, apologized Tuesday for a video advertisement on its website that targeted doctors of osteopathic medicine.

“A lot of you guys have pointed out an insensitive video we had on our site — we are incredibly sorry for any hurt this has caused you, especially our female DOs (who are amazing!),” the company said in a statement. “FIGS is a female founded company whose only mission is to make you guys feel awesome.”

The company also tweeted: “We dropped the ball and and we are so sorry. We love you guys and we’ll always listen to what you have to say!”

The video, which is no longer on the company’s website, features a woman in neon pink scrubs reading a book titled “Medical Terminology for Dummies” while holding it upside down.

The camera zooms in on the woman as she adjusts the waist of her pants, capturing a work identification card that says “DO.”

Doctors of osteopathic medicine, or DOs, are fully licensed physicians, according to the American Osteopathic Association. They are different from traditional medical doctors in that they are trained to take a holistic approach to patient care.

Many people slammed Figs on social media Tuesday, accusing the company of exhibiting gender bias in the ad.

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine said in a statement that it was “outraged that in 2020, women physicians and doctors of osteopathic medicine are still attacked in thoughtless and ignorant marketing campaigns.”

“A company like FIGS that asks us to spend money on its product should be ashamed for promoting these stereotypes,” the statement said. “We demand the respect we’ve earned AND a public apology.”

Brenna Hohl, a first-year medical student in Lillington, North Carolina, said “the disrespect for female physicians and DOs exhibited in the ad is unforgivable.” She said she was offended by it.

“Not only did it offend female DOs, but it is also extremely disrespectful toward any woman working in the healthcare field,” she said in an interview.

Marie Thigpen, a neonatologist in North Carolina, said it was “shameful.”

“Female doc here,” she wrote on the company’s Facebook page. “How many execs saw this and no one said a thing? How many in your company thought this would be a good ad? That’s the real problem. You don’t even realize that your ad is trash. Well female docs, nurses and staff have spending power and we will spend elsewhere.”

Cara Norvell, a doctor of osteopathic medicine in Dallas, said she hoped the company’s founders “will gain access to a book called ‘Advertising for Dummies.’”

She said the ad was

Black Doctors Work to Make Coronavirus Testing More Equitable

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

When the coronavirus arrived in Philadelphia in March, Dr. Ala Stanford hunkered down at home with her husband and kids. A pediatric surgeon with a private practice, she has staff privileges at a few suburban Philadelphia hospitals. For weeks, most of her usual procedures and patient visits were canceled. So she found herself, like a lot of people, spending the days in her pajamas, glued to the TV.

And then, at the beginning of April, she started seeing media reports indicating that Black people were contracting the coronavirus and dying from COVID-19 at greater rates than other demographic groups.

“It just hit me like, what is going on?” said Stanford.

At the same time, she started hearing from Black friends who couldn’t get tested because they didn’t have a doctor’s referral or didn’t meet the testing criteria. In April, there were shortages of coronavirus tests in numerous locations across the country, but Stanford decided to call around to the hospitals where she works to learn more about why people were being turned away.

One explanation she heard was that a doctor had to sign on to be the “physician of record” for anyone seeking a test. In a siloed health system, it could be complicated to sort out the logistics of who would communicate test results to patients. And, in an effort to protect health care workers from being exposed to the virus, some test sites wouldn’t let people without cars simply walk up to the test site.

Stanford knew African Americans were less likely to have primary care physicians than white Americans, and more likely to rely on public transportation. She just couldn’t square all that with the disproportionate infection rates for Black people she was seeing on the news.

“All these reasons in my mind were barriers and excuses,” she said. “And, in essence, I decided in that moment we were going to test the city of Philadelphia.”



Dr Ala Stanford and her staff on duty a coronavirus testing site in Pennsylvania. Stanford created the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium and sends mobile test units into neighborhoods.

Black Philadelphians contract the coronavirus at a rate nearly twice that of their white counterparts. They also are more likely to have severe cases of the virus: African Americans make up 44% of Philadelphians but 55% of those hospitalized for COVID-19.

Black Philadelphians are more likely to work jobs that can’t be performed at home, putting them at a greater risk of exposure. In the city’s jails, sanitation and transportation departments, workers are predominantly Black, and as the pandemic progressed they contracted COVID-19 at high rates.

The increased severity of illness among African Americans may also be due in part to underlying health conditions more prevalent among Black people, but Stanford maintains that unequal access to health care is the greatest driver of the disparity.

“When an elderly funeral home director in West Philly tries to get tested

Barcelona doctors strike to improve conditions [Video]

Holding up banners and chanting “enough, enough”, health workers demonstrated in front of the Catalan healthcare headquarters.

Despite health workers offering only “minimal healthcare services” during the four-day strike, local residents said they supported the health workers´ battle and still received good healthcare attendance.

“I very much agree that there is a strike and I am very happy with how they have treated me, I was a little worried about that (the strike) but no, they have treated me very well and I think that the health personnel are the ones who have the most reasons to go on strike as things are today,” Jose Enrique Gargallo said.

Spain has reported nearly 28,000 new coronavirus cases since Friday (October 9), bringing the cumulative total to 888,968, health ministry data showed on Monday (October 12).

The death toll from the virus rose by 195 from Friday to a total of 33,124. Spain does not report its coronavirus data during the weekend.

Video Transcript

[SPEAKING SPANISH]

INTERPRETER: We’re asking for help because we cannot give people the resources they need to be treated during this COVID pandemic. I mean, we are not treating people as we should in the current circumstances we’re facing in this pandemic.

JOSE ENRIQUE GARGALLO: [SPEAKING SPANISH]

INTERPRETER: I very much agree that there is a strike and I am very happy with how they’ve treated me. I was a little worried about that, but no, they have treated me very well. And I think the health personnel are the ones who have the most reasons to go on strike as things are today.

Source Article

Alignment Healthcare Adds MemorialCare Hospitals and Doctors to 2021 Medicare Advantage Provider Network

Nationally ranked nonprofit health system and Medicare Advantage insurance provider sign agreement to expand access to care for Medicare-eligible beneficiaries in Southern California

MemorialCare, a leading nonprofit health system in Southern California with hundreds of primary care and specialty providers, four top hospitals and 200 locations, is joining Alignment Healthcare’s Medicare Advantage provider network starting Jan. 1, 2021, expanding its scope of coverage to 2 million Medicare-eligible residents in Los Angeles and Orange counties.1

This means that Medicare beneficiaries who enroll in select plans from Alignment – named one of four 2020 Best Insurance Companies for Medicare Advantage in California by U.S. News & World Report – will have access to MemorialCare’s hospitals, health centers and urgent care locations and may seek “in-network” care from physicians associated with MemorialCare Medical Foundation. Medicare’s annual enrollment period for the 2021 plan year begins Oct. 15.

“As part of Alignment’s network, we will ensure that more people will have increased access to MemorialCare’s renowned services,” said Mark Schafer, M.D., CEO, MemorialCare Medical Foundation, which includes MemorialCare Medical Group, Greater Newport Physicians, and Edinger Medical Group. “MemorialCare has a long, 113-year history of providing quality care to Southern California communities, and joining Alignment’s network allows us to continue delivering on that commitment.”

Alignment Healthcare continues to grow and recently announced in August that it plans to expand its Medicare Advantage plans into several new markets across California, Nevada, and North Carolina starting in 2021. Alignment’s health care delivery model – powered by its proprietary command center technology AVA™ – and ACCESS On-Demand Concierge program, launched in 2019, offers its Medicare Advantage members white-glove service such as round-the-clock access to a doctor by phone or video, a dedicated concierge team, and a black benefits card that can be used like a debit card – all at no additional cost. Depending on their plan, members receive a monthly allowance automatically loaded onto their black card to purchase eligible over-the-counter and grocery benefit items at more than 50,000 retailers nationwide.

“At Alignment Healthcare, we are always looking for ways to make our members happy, and we hope they will be pleased with having access to MemorialCare’s top-rated doctors, hospitals and services,” said Dawn Maroney, president of consumer and markets, Alignment Healthcare. “This announcement is also an important consideration for Southern Californians who are making a decision about their 2021 Medicare coverage during this year’s Medicare Annual Election Period – to know what health care providers will be available to them in their health plan’s network when they need it in 2021.”

MemorialCare’s Long Beach Medical Center, Orange Coast Medical Center, Saddleback Medical Center and Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach have been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of America’s Best Hospitals and “high performing” in numerous clinical categories since the rankings began. In addition, MemorialCare Medical Foundation comprises more than 350 primary care physicians and 2,250 specialists in the areas of internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, pulmonology,

Some U.S. doctors flee to New Zealand where the outbreak is under control and science is respected

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Hagen Hopkins | Getty Images

Dr. Judy Melinek knew it was time to make a change when she started fear for her health and safety.

While working as acting chief forensic pathologist for Alameda County in California, she read early reports about a virus in Wuhan, China. By June, after repeatedly sounding the alarm about the need for health workers to have sufficient personal protective equipment, she’d had enough. She also hoped for temperature checks, social distancing and masks, but she noticed that not all of the staff in her office were taking these steps.

And then an email appeared offering her the opportunity to relocate to New Zealand, a country that has reported less than 2,000 coronavirus cases and 25 deaths, drawing widespread praise from around the world for its science-led response. Melinek jumped at the opportunity. 

After a period of quarantine, she’s now living and working in Wellington City, New Zealand. She’s been impressed so far. “There’s a lot more respect for the government and for science here,” she said. 

Melinek is part of a wave of U.S. doctors plotting a move to New Zealand. A spokesperson for Global Medical Staffing, a recruitment group that helps doctors find short and long-term positions around the world, noted that inquiries have increased about relocating to New Zealand from the U.S. as more physician jobs have been affected during the pandemic. In addition, more physicians currently employed in New Zealand who already located are choosing to extend their contracts “because of fewer reported cases of Covid-19,” meaning that there’s a slight dip in open roles. 

Melinek has been open about her decision on social media, and has subsequently heard from half dozen of her peers considering doing the same. She expects the number to keep rising as the pandemic continues. “America will suffer an exodus of professionals to other countries that have responded better, with economies that have recovered faster,” she said. 

In the the United States, where the federal government has largely left the response for the pandemic up to the states, more than 213,000 people have died from the virus. Across the country, some states have largely reopened, despite recent surges in cases. An outbreak that tore throughout the White House has spread to at least 37 people, including President Donald Trump, according to a website tracking the infections. 

New Zealand, by contrast, recently declared victory over the virus after eradicating community spread for the second time. 

In addition, many public health workers and scientists based in the United States say they have faced online harassment and threats while sharing guidance to the public about measures to keep them safe, including masks and social distancing. New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has repeatedly praised scientists, and offered empathy to the public at the most trying times, including during the early lockdown. 

New Zealand

Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’



a group of people standing in front of a building: Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: 'No more spin doctors'


© Getty Images
Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’

The Washington Post’s editorial board on Friday called for the White House to be more transparent about the state of President Trump’s health, demanding “more than spin doctors.”

“All presidents like to project robust health and are loath to admit weakness, even if caused by events beyond their control.” the board wrote in an opinion piece, citing when President Reagan was shot in 1981.

“But when a president’s health is abnormal, the public has a right to know, especially if the problem has any effect on his fitness to perform his duties. In Mr. Trump’s case, the unanswered questions are glaring,” they continued.

Trump was brought to the Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday, Oct. 2, just hours after announcing that both he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus.

The next day, doctors offered a rosy assessment of Trump’s health during a televised briefing. But statements The Associated Press and other outlets later attributed to White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and other sources gave a more alarming account of the president’s health.

The White House later acknowledged that Trump had received oxygen as he was being treated for COVID-19 after White House physician Sean Conley initially sidestepped answering on the topic. Conley maintained the team briefing on Trump’s condition wasn’t “necessarily” trying to “hide” anything from the public.

Conley later disclosed during a briefing with reporters that Trump received supplemental oxygen after his diagnosis.

When asked why he had been reluctant to disclose whether Trump had received oxygen, Conley said he was “trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, that his course of illness has had.”

This week, Conley repeatedly ducked more questions about Trump’s health and the timeline of his infection, even though Trump was deemed well enough to leave the hospital and return to the White House.

The Washington Post board noted that Trump had a packed schedule the week before his coronavirus diagnosis, which included introducing his Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett in a White House Rose Garden event.

The White House has battled a spate of recent COVID-19 diagnoses among staff, leading Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, to describe what he called a “superspreader event” at the White House.

According to a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) memo obtained by ABC News this week, 34 White House staffers and “other contacts” have been infected with the coronavirus in recent days.

“Leadership matters, and Mr. Trump has been calamitously unable to provide it. In the pandemic, he offered glib reassurances when the nation needed realism,” The Post’s editorial concluded. “On the question of his personal health, a matter of public interest, we need more than spin doctors. We need real doctors providing real information.”

Trump plans to hold an in-person event at the White House on Saturday, two officials confirmed to The Hill, his first

Is Trump ready to hit the campaign trail? Here’s what doctors say

Just days after receiving oxygen therapy for Covid-19, US President Donald Trump is busy giving long TV interviews and says he’s eager to return to the campaign trail. 

But is he risking his recovery by taking on too much too soon, and could he still infect others? 

– Each case is unique – 

According to Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease and critical care doctor as well as scholar at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, there is a wide variation between patients in terms of the speed of their recovery.

“Some people are able to resume their activities of daily living pretty quickly. There are other people to take some weeks before they’re back to their baseline,” he said.

In general, “for someone in their 70s who was hospitalized with Covid, I would say it takes a couple of weeks to get back to their baseline.

“But because he’s the president, he has a lot of people assisting him with his activities of daily living. He probably doesn’t carry his groceries in, he doesn’t drive a car.” 

Trump was hospitalized for three nights on October 2 and has been in the care of the White House medical unit — which can provide hospital-level care — since October 5, four days ago.

Doctor Mangala Narasimhan, senior vice president of critical care at Northwell Health, New York, said patients of Trump’s age who had needed oxygen for Covid pneumonia often continue to experience “severe fatigue and myalgia, which are muscle pains and aches,” for some time after.

Both doctors stressed it is very difficult to know precisely where Trump is in his recovery, since his medical team and others around him have provided opaque and at times conflicting updates.

– Danger of coming back too soon – 

A well-known danger from over-exertion following disease is that it wears down the immune system.

“He needs his immune system to fight the virus — that’s why you’re always told to stick to rest and drink fluids, because your immune system needs to be at its optimum,” said Narasimhan.

She added this was particularly crucial for older patients who are more susceptible to experiencing a second viral replication phase where symptoms such as fevers and chills return.

Trump’s full medical history and underlying conditions aren’t fully known, but one thing we are aware of is that he has mild heart disease that could be aggravated, said Adalja.

Narasimhan added that Trump’s medical team hasn’t released key lab values, from which doctors could infer more information. 

These include “inflammatory markers” that would indicate how he was recovering from the inflammatory phase of the disease, and certain blood values that would reveal how likely he is to develop clots as a result of the virus.

“People tend to form clots, and depending on what his blood levels are of certain things, you would want to make sure that at 30 days afterwards that he is on medicine that would prevent clots,” she said.

“There’s all kinds

The Difference Between PCOS And Endometriosis, Explained By Doctors

In the world of reproductive conditions that can be tough to diagnose, two tend to get the most attention: polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis. While you’ve probably at least heard of both of these conditions, you might be fuzzy on the details. And, with that, it’s easy to confuse the two.

It’s important to know that it’s not rare to have either one of these health issues. “These are two relatively common gynecological conditions,” says Taraneh Shirazian, MD, an ob-gyn with NYU Langone Health. PCOS affects one in 10 women of childbearing age, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). Endometriosis is slightly more common, impacting more than 11 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the OWH.

Both conditions are notoriously tough to diagnose, given that their symptoms could be caused by a range of different issues, says Jessica Shepherd, MD, an ob-gyn in Texas. That doesn’t mean it’s impossible for a doctor to make the right diagnosis—it just can take a little more time and detective work than with some other conditions.

But, while both PCOS and endometriosis have some characteristics and symptoms in common, they’re not the same. “They’re very distinct, different conditions,” Dr. Shirazian notes. Here’s what you need to know about the differences between PCOS and endometriosis.

What exactly is PCOS?

What it is: PCOS is a health problem caused by an imbalance of reproductive hormones, the OWH says. That hormonal imbalance creates problems in the ovaries, which make an egg that’s released each month as part of a menstrual cycle. When you have PCOS, the egg might be develop the way it should or it might not be released during ovulation, the OWH says.

The most common symptoms:

  • Irregular periods
  • Excess hair growth on the face, chest, abdomen, or upper thighs
  • Severe acne, or acne that doesn’t respond to typical treatments
  • Oily skin
  • Patches of thick, velvety, darkened skin
  • Ovarian cysts

    What is endometriosis?

    What it is: Endometriosis, also commonly referred to as simply “endo,” happens when the endometrium, the tissue that normally lines the uterus, grows outside of the uterus and on other areas in your body where it doesn’t belong, according to the OWH. Endometriosis tissue growth is most commonly found on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, tissues that hold the uterus in place, and the outer surface of the uterus, although it can also show up on the vagina, cervix, vulva, bowel, bladder, or rectum, too.

    Endometriosis implants respond to changes in the female hormone estrogen, and the implants may grow and bleed like the uterine lining does during your period, ACOG says. That can cause the surrounding tissue to become irritated, inflamed, and swollen.

    The most common symptoms:

    • Chronic pelvic pain, especially before and during your period
    • Pain during sex
    • Pain when you poop
    • Pain when you pee
    • Heavy bleeding during your period

      Worth noting: Many women with endometriosis don’t have symptoms, according to