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Pence ordered the closure of US borders against CDC’s wishes: report

Vice President Pence in March reportedly ordered the director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to use its emergency powers to close the U.S. borders, despite top scientists saying there was no evidence that doing so would reduce the spread of COVID-19.



Mike Pence wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Pence ordered the closure of US borders against CDC's wishes: report


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Pence ordered the closure of US borders against CDC’s wishes: report

The vice president called the CDC’s director, Robert Redfield, and told him to use the medical agency’s special powers allotted during a pandemic, The Associated Press reported.

Title 42 of the Public Health Service Act gives federal health officials the authority to take certain wide-reaching measures during a pandemic in order to prevent the spread of a disease, including limiting immigration from countries with high numbers of confirmed cases.

Three people with direct knowledge of the situation told the AP that Pence’s request came after the CDC had initially refused to comply with a Trump administration directive to shut down borders, saying at the time that there was no valid health reason to issue such a directive.

A former anonymous CDC official who was not authorized to divulge internal discussions said that Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, and acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf were also on the phone call. The source told the AP that Redfield immediately ordered his senior staff to carry out the order.

Since the action was implemented in March, it has caused nearly 150,000 children and adults to be expelled from the U.S., according to the AP’s analysis.

The CDC’s order covered the U.S. borders with both Mexico and Canada, but has had a larger impact on the thousands of asylum-seekers and immigrants at the southern border.

Although public health experts recommended that the Trump administration focus on a national mask mandate, enforcing social distancing and increasing the number of contact tracers, top White House officials, including Trump aide Stephen Miller, pushed for the immigration order from the CDC.

“That was a Stephen Miller special. He was all over that,” said Olivia Troye, a former top aide to Pence.

Troye recently resigned, saying the administration was prioritizing politics over the health and safety of Americans.

“There was a lot of pressure on DHS and CDC to push this forward,” she told the AP.

Anthony So, an international expert at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, wrote in a letter to Redfield in April that “the decision to halt asylum processes ‘to protect the public health’ is not based on evidence or science,” and said “this order directly endangers tens of thousands of lives and threatens to amplify dangerous anti-immigrant sentiment and xenophobia.”

Pence spokeswoman Katie Miller told The Hill on Saturday that the AP’s reporting was “false.”

“Vice President Pence never directed the CDC on this issue,” Miller said when contacted with a request for comment.

The AP’s reporting comes as approximately 2,000 migrants from Honduras are traveling toward the U.S. southern border.

Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei reportedly said in a broadcast

Paris Hilton calls for Utah boarding school’s closure following her abuse allegations, starts petition

Paris Hilton is calling for the Provo Canyon School (PCS) — where the socialite alleges she was abused while she was enrolled as a teen — to be shut down.

The former “Simple Life” star shared never-before-heard details of what she allegedly endured in her new documentary “This is Paris,” as well as in an interview with People magazine last month. Hilton claimed she was traumatized daily at the Provo Canyon School in Utah, where she was enrolled for 11 months at age 17.

Provo Canyon School previously responded to People magazine’s original report, telling Fox News in a statement at the time: “Originally opened in 1971, Provo Canyon School was sold by its previous ownership in August 2000. We therefore cannot comment on the operations or patient experience prior to this time.”

Provo Canyon School did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request seeking additional comment.

PARIS HILTON’S BOARDING SCHOOL ABUSE: FORMER CLASSMATES REVEAL NEW DETAILS, DUB STAR A ‘HERO’

Now, the hotel heiress and pop culture phenomenon is calling for the facility to be shut down in a new video shared on her YouTube Channel on Monday.

“I was abused at Provo Canyon School,” Hilton, dressed in a sharp white blazer, claimed in the video, which is titled: “SHUT DOWN PROVO CANYON SCHOOL.”

Paris Hilton previously alleged she was traumatized daily at the Provo Canyon School in Utah, where she was enrolled for 11 months at age 17. The boarding school has said that it was 'originally opened in 1971' and 'was sold by its previous ownership in August 2000. We therefore cannot comment on the operations or patient experience prior to this time.' (Photo by Tibrina Hobson/WireImage)

Paris Hilton previously alleged she was traumatized daily at the Provo Canyon School in Utah, where she was enrolled for 11 months at age 17. The boarding school has said that it was ‘originally opened in 1971’ and ‘was sold by its previous ownership in August 2000. We therefore cannot comment on the operations or patient experience prior to this time.’ (Photo by Tibrina Hobson/WireImage)

Below the video, Hilton alleges that “Provo took away my childhood among thousands of other survivors, as early as 9 years old.” She added that “while this movement is so personal to me, it is much bigger than just my experience.”

The 39-year-old further maintained in the clip that she plans to “put all my effort into reforming the industry.”

PARIS HILTON DETAILS ALLEGED ABUSE AT UTAH BOARDING SCHOOL FOR THE FIRST TIME: ‘CONTINUOUS TORTURE’

In addition, Hilton plugged a Change.org petition, which had over 40,000 signatures at the time of publishing. She has been pushing for reform on her Twitter account as well.

“This Is Paris,” a recent documentary centered on Hilton’s upbringing and wild teenage years which aired on YouTube earlier this month, put the Utah school on notice and shed light on the #BreakingCodeSilence initiative Hilton and her former Provo classmates launched to expose the industry.

Paris Hilton. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)

Paris Hilton. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)

A memorandum has since been placed on the boarding school’s website just below the masthead, referencing the Hilton’s documentary.

PARIS HILTON SAYS SHE WAS PHYSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY ABUSED IN PAST RELATIONSHIPS

“We are aware of a new documentary referencing Provo Canyon School (PCS),” the note reads. “Please note that PCS was sold by its previous ownership in August 2000. We therefore cannot comment on

Santa Fe dentist’s office reopens after COVID-19 closure | Coronavirus

A Santa Fe dental practice reopened Monday following a nearly two-week closure due to confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the doctor and one of his assistants.

Dentist Jared French said he saw one patient Sept. 14, a Monday, and then felt an itch in his throat and went home.

He took a test that afternoon to determine if he had contracted COVID-19, French said, and after it came back positive two days later, he closed his practice.

A patient, an assistant and a dental hygienist who were at the office Sept. 16 before the closure all tested negative.

“It’s a dicey situation. You have to open back up, but you want to protect people,” French said. “We were able to prevent transmission. In the end, that’s what really matters.”

Under guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for health care workers, French was not required to wait 14 days before returning to work. The CDC’s symptom-based guidelines say it’s safe to return to work if at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, at least 24 hours have passed since the patient last experienced fever and other symptoms have improved.

The doctor’s wife, Lara French, said she believes she might have become infected with COVID-19 while visiting family in Utah earlier this month and then infected her husband while she was quarantining after her return.

“It’s hard to know,” Lara French said. “I was only in close contact with a few family members there, but I think that’s where I got it.”

Maddy Hayden, a spokeswoman with the New Mexico Environment Department, said the agency performed a rapid response at the dental office, which involves ensuring employers are following COVID-19 safety guidelines. Monitors determined a further investigation by the Occupational Health and Safety Bureau was not warranted, Hayden said.

During the roughly 48 hours between when the time French left the office with a symptom of the illness and the time he closed the practice, a dental hygienist — who did not work at the office Sept. 14 — saw patients at the practice, the dentist said.

French said he felt comfortable leaving the practice open while he awaited his test result because people who had close contact with him were isolating and the facility had been following health, safety and cleaning guidelines.

“We followed policies and tried to be reasonable, and that’s the decision we made,” French said. “I think the proof is in the pudding, as there was no transmission.”

At least one patient thought French should have closed the practice sooner or at least alerted patients about the possible infection.

“If someone had told me he was sick and went to get tested, I would have changed my appointment,” said Harriet Schreiner, who visited the office the morning of Sept. 16, a Wednesday.

She believes French put her and others in harm’s way by not disclosing he had left the office two days prior with COVID-19 symptoms.

“Nobody said anything to me

Santa Fe dentist’s office reopens after COVID-19 closure | Coronavirus

A Santa Fe dental practice reopened Monday following a nearly two-week closure due to confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the doctor and one of his assistants.

Dentist Jared French said he saw one patient Sept. 14, a Monday, and then felt an itch in his throat and went home.

He took a test that afternoon to determine if he had contracted COVID-19, French said, and after it came back positive two days later, he closed his practice.

A patient, an assistant and a dental hygienist who were at the office Sept. 16 before the closure all tested negative.

“It’s a dicey situation. You have to open back up, but you want to protect people,” French said. “We were able to prevent transmission. In the end, that’s what really matters.”

Under guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for health care workers, French was not required to wait 14 days before returning to work. The CDC’s symptom-based guidelines say it’s safe to return to work if at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, at least 24 hours have passed since the patient last experienced fever and other symptoms have improved.

The doctor’s wife, Lara French, said she believes she might have become infected with COVID-19 while visiting family in Utah earlier this month and then infected her husband while she was quarantining after her return.

“It’s hard to know,” Lara French said. “I was only in close contact with a few family members there, but I think that’s where I got it.”

Maddy Hayden, a spokeswoman with the New Mexico Environment Department, said the agency performed a rapid response at the dental office, which involves ensuring employers are following COVID-19 safety guidelines. Monitors determined a further investigation by the Occupational Health and Safety Bureau was not warranted, Hayden said.

During the roughly 48 hours between when the time French left the office with a symptom of the illness and the time he closed the practice, a dental hygienist — who did not work at the office Sept. 14 — saw patients at the practice, the dentist said.

French said he felt comfortable leaving the practice open while he awaited his test result because people who had close contact with him were isolating and the facility had been following health, safety and cleaning guidelines.

“We followed policies and tried to be reasonable, and that’s the decision we made,” French said. “I think the proof is in the pudding, as there was no transmission.”

At least one patient thought French should have closed the practice sooner or at least alerted patients about the possible infection.

“If someone had told me he was sick and went to get tested, I would have changed my appointment,” said Harriet Schreiner, who visited the office the morning of Sept. 16, a Wednesday.

She believes French put her and others in harm’s way by not disclosing he had left the office two days prior with COVID-19 symptoms.

“Nobody said anything to me