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The best cheap fitness tracker deals for October 2020: Garmin, Fitbit and more



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(Pocket-lint) – If you’re in the market for a new tracker or smartwatch, then you’re in the right place, as we’re covering the top offers on some of the best fitness devices out there.

There great savings are from well-known and popular brands such as Fitbit, Garmin and Samsung, and with Prime Day 2020 soon to be on us, we’re expecting a lot more deals over the coming weeks. 

Garmin Fenix 5

  • Great for the outdoors
  • Long battery life
  • Accurate

The Fenix is the top tier of Garmin devices, offering accurate tracking in all conditions. It’s designed to be a little tougher and last a little longer than the top Forerunner devices. The Fenix 5 is a little older, but that’s why there’s usually good deals to be had on it.

Fitbit Inspire

  • Slim and stylish design
  • Sleep tracking
  • Great for tweens

The Fitbit Inspire replaced the Alta and offers step and activity tracking in a fitness band. This entry-level model lacks some the heart rate tracking that you get on the model up, but it’s great for tracking daily activity while also giving you smartphone notifications. It will also offer sleep tracking, so it’s great for younger users.

Garmin Forerunner 35

  • Accurate fitness tracking
  • Strong battery life
  • Reliable heart rate sensor

If you’re looking for an entry into the world of running watches then the Garmin Forerunner 35 is a watch that tunes itself brilliantly to the rigours and requirements of a dedicated running watch. It’s a little older, but still a reliable option for those who want to track their running with GPS and heart rate.

Garmin Vivoactive 3

  • Accurate activity tracking
  • Lifestyle focused

With a slightly slicker design that some of the Forerunner models, the Vivoactive is aimed at lifestyle users rather than hardcore athletes. That means it has a touchscreen interface, but it still uses the same core tracking skills and sensors. That means it’s just as accurate as many of the top Garmin devices, but slightly more approachable.

Other fitness tracker deals

Not seeing a good bargain above? Feel free to use the quick retailer links below to to find your idea deal.

Source Article

Trump says insulin is now so cheap, it’s ‘like water.’ It isn’t

President Trump made a number of claims about lowering drug prices during his debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden. Most were untrue. <span class="copyright">(Arkasha Stevenson / Los Angeles Times)</span>
President Trump made a number of claims about lowering drug prices during his debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden. Most were untrue. (Arkasha Stevenson / Los Angeles Times)

There was much to dislike in this week’s presidential debate — the lies, the rudeness, the inability of the White House incumbent to rise above the level of a cranky kindergartner.

For me, the low point came not when President Trump refused to condemn white supremacy, and not when he tore into the sons of Democratic candidate Joe Biden, but when he once again sought to convince the American people that he had single-handedly lowered the cost of prescription drugs.

Trump claimed that drug prices “will be coming down 80% or 90%” thanks to him.

He claimed that a series of executive orders have forced pharmaceutical companies to slash prices.

And the one that floored me: Trump claimed that the cost of insulin is now so low, it’s practically free.

“I’m getting it for so cheap, it’s like water,” he said. “You want to know the truth? So cheap.”

Like water.

“Saying that insulin is as cheap as water is a complete disconnect from reality,” said Vivian Ho, a healthcare economist at Rice University.

“For the overwhelming majority of the millions of Americans with diabetes who depend on insulin, the prices are outrageous,” she told me. “People have been dying because they can’t afford insulin.”

I don’t want to make this about me. This is about a country saddled with a former game-show host who believes he can say anything to advance his personal and political interests.

But as someone with Type 1 diabetes, who relies on daily insulin doses to stay alive, I found Trump’s remarks particularly offensive, even for him.

It may take some effort for many Americans to fact-check Trump’s claims that Mexico is paying for his border wall or that he’s accomplished more than all other presidents.

The high price of drugs — no ambiguity there. Stratospheric drug costs hit nearly every American family where they live.

Spending on prescription meds soared from $354 billion in 2009 to about $535 billion in 2018, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

This is an increase of 50% compared with 17% inflation over the same period. Drug spending is expected to approach $600 billion this year.

As for insulin, well, Trump is taking a modest improvement for a relatively small number of people with diabetes and presenting it as a political triumph for all.

What he was apparently referring to with that comment about insulin now being “like water” was an announcement in May from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that some (but not all) Medicare plans would cap monthly insulin co-payments by seniors at $35.

This won’t begin until next year. It also will affect fewer than half the estimated 7.4 million Americans with diabetes who use insulin, leaving everyone else to continue paying as much as $300 per vial, which in many

Diabetic Americans dispute Trump’s claim he made insulin so cheap ‘it’s like water’

That came as a shock to the Americans who shell out hundreds of dollars a month on insulin, a number of whom posted triple-digit pharmacy bills to social media immediately after the president’s assertion.

“I looked at my husband and slapped my leg and said, ‘Can you believe that!’ ” said Tiffany Garrioch, 36, a public health nurse and educator in Minnesota with Type 1 diabetes, who watched the debate with her family.

“We’re already an underserved and highly vulnerable population,” she said. “To hear the president say it costs as much as water makes us look like we’re crybabies or liars.”

Insulin costs her $36.76 a day, she said. In 2008, it was $9.81.

Insulin prices have ballooned over two decades, including during the Trump administration. A subset of people enrolled in Medicare drug plans that cap payments at $35 a month are insulated from those costs. Otherwise a patient with diabetes can spend hundreds of dollars on a monthly insulin supply.

A few decades ago, people could pay about $20 per month for insulin, said Jeremy Greene, a primary care physician and medical historian at Johns Hopkins University. “Insulin prices have been a travesty of American pharmaceutical policy.”

The only way Trump’s statement could not be anything but an “out-and-out fabrication,” Greene said, is if insulin were compared to some of the priciest bottled water on Earth — such as the liquid harvested twice a year from melting Arctic polar ice that the doctor once spotted for sale in a Norway airport.

“The cost of insulin is still high for the majority of Americans who need it to survive,” said Laura Friedman, vice president for federal payment policy at the American Diabetes Association, which supports insurance co-pay caps and Medicaid expansion to help people with diabetes afford the drug.

“The ADA and the millions who are living with diabetes look forward to the day when insulin is affordable so that people can stop suffering from the consequences of dangerous practices like rationing insulin due to exorbitant costs,” she said in a statement.

About 1 in 4 patients with diabetes report underusing insulin because of financial pressure, which “effectively means that they are trying to make their insulin stretch, or having difficulty buying groceries or paying utility bills,” said physician Jing Luo, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing.

Switching to cheaper but less effective forms of insulin, or rationing it, can be devastating. People with diabetes can suffer strokes, kidney failure or death without sufficient insulin.

“The consequence of the untenable price of insulin can be measured in body counts,” Greene said.

Three companies — Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi — dominate the market for insulin.

Insulin sold by Novo Nordisk, under the brand name NovoLog, was priced at $40 per vial in 2001 and rose to $289 in 2018, as The Washington Post reported last year. Eli Lilly’s Humalog insulin was $275 a vial as of last year, up from