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Try Ashley Graham’s 5-Day Home Workout Challenge

Five days, five workouts, all less than 10 minutes long: all we can say is thank you, Ashley Graham, for an A+ fitness challenge! The supermodel released a 10-minutes-a-day plan as a part of her YouTube series, “Thank Bod,” which is all about getting strong and creating an accessible fitness routine, no matter where you are in your journey. And Graham, who’s seven months postpartum, isn’t just sharing the workouts — she’s doing each one with us, filming from her garage at her family home in Nebraska.

Ahead, check out each of the five at-home workouts, created by Graham’s trainer Kira Stokes, NASM. The circuits target abs, arms, lower body, and full body, and don’t require any dumbbells, kettlebells, or machines. (Booty bands are optional in the last workout if you want a little more resistance.) The workouts are great, Graham’s personality and humor are on full display, and we’re sweating just watching. Throw on your workout clothes and let’s get to work!

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The Challenge of Tracking COVID-Infected Students

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.



As students returned to the University of Missouri, the Columbia/Boone County Department of Public Health and Human Services saw a COVID spike, with the peak reaching more than 200 new cases per day.

As the return of college students to campuses has fueled as many as 3,000 COVID-19 cases a day, keeping track of them is a logistical nightmare for local health departments and colleges.

Some students are putting down their home addresses instead of their college ones on their COVID testing forms — slowing the transfer of case data and hampering contact tracing across state and county lines.

The address issue has real consequences, as any delay in getting the case to the appropriate authorities allows the coronavirus to continue to spread unchecked. Making matters worse, college-age people already tend to be hard to trace because they are unlikely to answer a phone call from an unknown number.

“With that virus, you really need to be able to identify that case and their contacts in 72 hours,” said Indiana University’s assistant director for public health, Graham McKeen.

And if the students do go home once infected, where should their cases be counted? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention highlighted this issue in a recent study of an unnamed North Carolina university’s COVID outbreak, stating that the number of cases was likely an underestimate. “For example, some cases were reported to students’ home jurisdictions, some students did not identify themselves as students to the county health department, some students did not report to the student health clinic, and not all students were tested,” it said.

The White House Coronavirus Task Force even addressed the problem in weekly memos sent to the governors of Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky and New Jersey. “Do not reassign cases that test positive in university settings to hometown as this lessens ability to track and control local spread,” it recommended late last month in the memos, made public by the Center for Public Integrity.

While the full scope of the address confusion is unclear, the health departments of California, Indiana, Iowa and Virginia all acknowledged the challenges that arise when college cases cross state and county lines.

The maze of calls needed to track such cases also lays bare a larger problem: the lack of an interconnected COVID tracking system. Colleges have been setting up their own contact tracing centers to supplement overstretched local and state health departments.

“It is very patchwork, and people operate very differently, and it also doesn’t translate during a pandemic,” said McKeen, whose own university has had more than 2,900 cases across its Indiana campuses. “It made it very clear the public health system in this country is horribly underfunded and understaffed.”

Colleges’ transient populations have forever bedeviled public health when it comes to reportable infectious diseases, such as measles and bacterial meningitis, Association of Public Health Laboratories spokesperson Michelle Forman said in an email to

‘The Challenge’ star Abram Boise and pregnant wife open up about ‘vanishing twin’

MTV’s “The Challenge” star Abram Boise and his wife, Rachel Missie Boise, recently shared with fans that she’s pregnant with their first child. But the pregnancy hasn’t been what they were expecting.

In an Instagram post on Sunday, Missie Boise explained that the couple experienced what’s called a vanishing twin.

“My husband and I are so excited to announce we’re expecting our first child!” the mom-to-be wrote alongside a photo of herself and Boise, 37, exchanging a kiss as she holds up a sonogram. “This pregnancy started out as twins however within the first trimester my body decided it could only support one baby.”

“We experienced what’s called ‘vanishing twin,'” she continued. “The body sacrifices and reabsorbs the other fetus into the uterine wall, putting all that nourishment towards the strongest baby. We had gotten so attached to the idea of twins and mourned the loss of what could have been.”

“Now we continue to celebrate what is, the beautiful life growing healthy and strong,” Missie Boise concluded. “Our bodies are so dedicated towards protecting, and making decisions towards the greater good. Remember to be gentle, take care, and love yourself as your body chooses to love you.”

Vanishing twin syndrome usually occurs within the first trimester of pregnancy. They’re more commonly reported now than in previous years thanks to advancements in ultrasound technology, which can detect multiple pregnancies earlier than ever, according to WhatToExpect.com.

Vanishing twins are thought to occur in 20 to 30% of pregnancies, and often the mother doesn’t experience any symptoms. In fact, she usually goes on to have a normal pregnancy and deliver the single baby without complications, according to What To Expect.

A mom who lost one of her twins during pregnancy several years ago, Maura Deptula of Chicago, previously told TODAY that the experience left her “struck by how powerful my sadness was and how it lived alongside my great hope and joy.”

“I had people close to me say things like everything you went through was worth it because you now have this beautiful baby,” she recalled to TODAY. “And it will be easier for you to have only one, in the end, you’ll be happier.”

A vanishing twin left another mom, Julie Cook, a writer for the Daily Telegraph, wondering about the good and bad of early stage ultrasounds.

“Scans have enormous benefits, but do they also have a downside?” she wrote in a blog post a few years back. “Greater technology means greater awareness. But ignorance can sometimes be bliss.”

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This year’s Dubai Fitness Challenge will have an inflatable Aquapark challenge

AquaFun Park
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Dubai Sports Council has announced the addition of an exciting new event to its community sports calendar for the Dubai Fitness Challenge. The Aqua Challenge, which will take place at the AquaFun Waterpark in JBR on October 31, the second day of the city-wide sports event.  

The Aqua Challenge is the first event of its kind taking place in the Middle East, on one of the most fun and entertaining obstacles course in the country.There will be a total of 35 inflatable obstacles spread across the massive 50,000sqft AquaFun Waterpark, which is the largest inflatable aqua park in the world, and the obstacles will be arranged in the shape of “I Love Dubai”.

Participation is limited to a maximum of 150, so those interested in taking part will need to rush and visit PremierOnline.com to register. Registration is open to men and women aged 16 to 60. They can register as Individuals – Male and Female category – or as a mixed team of three. There will be prizes on offer for the podium finishers in collaboration with Dubai Sports Council.

The event will start at 3pm and due to adherence to social distancing and other COVID-19 safety protocols, no more than three people will be allowed to start in every wave, with a 60-second distance between every wave of participants.

Life jackets will be provided to the participants, but they will need to bring their own towel and a change of clothes. 

Key information:

Location: AquaFun Waterpark in JBR

Timing: October 31 from 3pm onwards

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Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced



a man doing a trick in the grass: Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced


© Provided by Khaleej Times
Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced

Dubai is all set to host a socially distanced version of the Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC), the city’s flagship fitness initiative. The fourth edition of the challenge, which seeks to get residents and tourists to commit to 30 minutes of fitness activities for 30 days, begins on October 30.

The event that runs till November 28 will feature a mix of virtual and physical events and activities. “This year’s programme will have in place the highest standards of safety precautions and social distancing measures,” organisers said on Sunday.

Over the course of the 30-day challenge, Dubai will put up events, sports, health and wellness programmes and virtual sessions  to make fitness accessible and easy for all.

“DFC welcomes the whole city to find the motivation to keep moving, discover their passion for fitness and embark on a truly holistic wellness journey, regardless of age, ability, interest, fitness level or location preference.”

Further details, including registration information and the full line-up of activities, will be released in the coming weeks. Participants are encouraged to set goals prior to the initiative’s kick-off and register on the DFC website.

The all-inclusive fitness movement launched in 2017 by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai, sees Dubai transform into an open gym with fitness activities hosted across the city.

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Pairing service dogs with disabled veterans is goal of fitness challenge event this month | Local News

Hi! My name is Zero Suit Samus (or Samus for short), and I’m an energetic pitbull mix who needs some love. And I really mean that. I need a family who will cuddle with me because your penalty for not giving me cuddles is to hear the cry of my people. My foster dad says that based on my crying, I must have descended from pterodactyls, but that’s silly because pterodactyls don’t even like peanut butter. And I looove peanut butter. And treats. And strawberries. And watermelon. And anything, really. Honestly kid, if you give me your salad, I’ll eat it. Don’t want your broccoli? I’ll take care of your problem. See that toy? It’s in my stomach now. See that puke? Well, you can have your toy back.

Like all superdogs, I have an origin story: I ran across the highway and caused a 4-car pileup that I ended up underneath. It wasn’t my best choice, but it’s still a better love story than “Twilight.” I have to take daily medication now, or else I have pretty severe seizures. But I like to think of my epilepsy as my unbridled superpower that the world just isn’t ready for yet.

I’m a Tulsa native, but I’m still not a fan of the Bermuda grass around here – I get allergies in the summer, so that’s something you should know. Despite this, I still love running and rolling in the grass, and if you toss me a ball, I can jump and catch it in mid-air even when it’s 6-feet high. I’m not exaggerating. (Pterodactyl dogs never exaggerate.) And would you mind spraying me with a hose once in a while? I love playing in water, especially when it’s coming out of a tiny hose at jet-like speeds.

But if you have another dog in the home, then forget about it because I’m a single-dog dog. A lone wolf. A rebel. I will not share my toys, I will not share my food, and I will not share my family. I do just fine around other dogs in general, but once you introduce toys or food, then I get very territorial. Can we agree that I’ll be your only one?

By the way, I love kids. I don’t have these problems with other humans, so don’t worry about bringing me home to your young ones. I am loyal to the bone. Don’t believe me? Try going for a jog with me. I will keep pace with you the entire time, just running by your hip. Need me to lick the sweat off your face after an especially hot run? Baby, that’s what I’m about. I’m a good dog. My foster family says so, too. I will take care of you if you let me. I’m eager to learn, I don’t catch coronaviruses, and I’m housebroken. I won’t poop in your Cheerios. Unless that’s one of your commands, but why would it be? Don’t want your Cheerios? Just let me have them

Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced – News

This year’s programme will have in place the highest standards of safety precautions and social distancing measures.

Dubai is all set to host a socially distanced version of the Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC), the city’s flagship fitness initiative. The fourth edition of the challenge, which seeks to get residents and tourists to commit to 30 minutes of fitness activities for 30 days, begins on October 30.

Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced (KT26287104.PNG)

The event that runs till November 28 will feature a mix of virtual and physical events and activities. “This year’s programme will have in place the highest standards of safety precautions and social distancing measures,” organisers said on Sunday.

Over the course of the 30-day challenge, Dubai will put up events, sports, health and wellness programmes and virtual sessions  to make fitness accessible and easy for all.

Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced (KT26285104.PNG)

“DFC welcomes the whole city to find the motivation to keep moving, discover their passion for fitness and embark on a truly holistic wellness journey, regardless of age, ability, interest, fitness level or location preference.”

Further details, including registration information and the full line-up of activities, will be released in the coming weeks. Participants are encouraged to set goals prior to the initiative’s kick-off and register on the DFC website.

Dubai Fitness Challenge is back, dates announced (KT26286104.PNG)

The all-inclusive fitness movement launched in 2017 by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai, sees Dubai transform into an open gym with fitness activities hosted across the city.

[email protected]

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Dubai fitness challenge will unite the city with action and purpose

  • Month-long calendar of exciting fitness and wellness events will exemplify Dubai government’s safety-first approach, with the highest standards of safety precautions and social distancing in place 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC) – the city’s flagship fitness initiative championed by His Highness Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of Dubai Executive Council, is returning for its fourth edition from October 30 to November 28, 2020 to energise the emirate and further unite the community. Featuring an exciting mix of virtual and physical events and activities, this year’s programme will have in place the highest standards of safety precautions and social distancing measures to ensure Dubai’s residents and visitors can stay connected as they commit to 30 minutes of daily physical activity for the 30 days.

Throughout the month, an inspiring calendar of events, sports, health and wellness programmes and virtual sessions will be available to make fitness accessible and easy for all to complete their 30 days of physical activity.  DFC welcomes the whole city to find the motivation to keep moving, discover their passion for fitness and embark on a truly holistic wellness journey, regardless of age, ability, interest, fitness level or location preference.

Further details, including registration information and the full line-up for Dubai Fitness Challenge will be released in the coming weeks. Participants are encouraged to set goals prior to the initiative’s kick-off and register on the Dubai Fitness Challenge website.

Health and safety of the city’s people remains DFC’s top priority. All events and activities will be held in accordance with the Dubai Government health and safety guidelines.

For further information and to register, please visit www.dubaifitnesschallenge.com 

-Ends-

For further information, please contact: Dubai Tourism on [email protected]  or Edelman on [email protected] 

For more information, see:
Facebook:        www.facebook.com/dubaifitnesschallenge
Instagram:        @dubaifitnesschallenge
Twitter:             @dxbfitchallenge
Hashtag:           #Dubai30x30

About Dubai Fitness Challenge

The Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC) is an initiative of His Highness Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of Dubai Executive Council. DFC has been created to motivate the people of Dubai to boost their physical activity and commit to 30 minutes of daily activity for 30 days. Running from October 30 to November 28 2020, the Challenge encompasses all forms of activity – from cycling and football, to kayaking, team sports, walking and yoga, as well as wellness and healthy lifestyle.  Everyone is encouraged to participate individually or together with friends, family and colleagues and enjoy new and exciting ways to improve their fitness and health levels, and help make Dubai the most active, healthiest, and happiest city in the world.

© Press Release 2020

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Sheikh Hamdan’s Dubai Fitness Challenge is back

Dubai: Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC) – the city’s yearly fitness initiative championed by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of Dubai Executive Council, is returning for its fourth edition. The event starts on October 30 and ends on November 28, The goal of DFC is to energise the emirate and unite the community.

This year, DFC will feature a mix of both virtual and physical events and activities and will have high standards of safety precautions and social distancing in place. This ensures that Dubai’s residents and visitors can stay connected as they commit to 30 minutes of daily physical activity for the 30 days.

Throughout the month, a calendar of events, sports, health and wellness programmes and virtual sessions will be available to make fitness accessible and easy for all to complete their 30 days of physical activity. DFC asks that the whole city to find the motivation to keep moving, discover their passion for fitness and embark on a holistic wellness journey, regardless of age, ability, interest, fitness level or location preference.

Further details, including registration information and the full line-up for Dubai Fitness Challenge, will be released in the coming weeks. Participants are encouraged to set goals prior to the initiative’s kick-off and register on the Dubai Fitness Challenge website.

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Diversity emerges as key challenge for coronavirus drug trials

The coronavirus pandemic has hit disproportionately hard in Black and Hispanic communities, where infection rates and death rates have reached staggering levels. 

But as scientists race to develop vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus and treatments for the COVID-19 disease it causes, many trials are struggling to enroll people from those very communities.

Government and private sector scientists trying to enroll tens of thousands of Americans in a handful of studies of potential coronavirus vaccines are working overtime to reach out to underrepresented communities. But they have reported running up against rumors and misinformation in minority communities in places like Seattle and New York City, where mistrust remains deeply rooted. 

That mistrust comes from America’s long history of discrimination against minority groups, some of whom have been used as human guinea pigs for sadistic experiments.  

The U.S. Public Health Service denied treatment to 600 Black men who had syphilis, even after penicillin became a widely available treatment, in the gruesome Tuskegee experiments. Native Americans were forced to undergo sterilization procedures, and some were used to test dangerous new pharmaceuticals. 

To many, that history is all too recent. Surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in recent years have found both Black Americans and Native Americans are less trusting of medical doctors than are whites. 

“There are countless examples that all get pushed into a general well-founded feeling that when people are coming to do experiments or trials in Black communities, maybe there’s an ulterior motive,” said Prabhjot Singh, a health systems expert at the Arnold Institute of Global Health.

Enrolling a diverse set of patients and volunteers in trials is both a scientific and cultural imperative, said some of those involved in designing trials today.  

On the scientific side, so little is known about the way the coronavirus attacks the body and the way COVID-19 manifests that diversity — in age groups, ethnic groups and even socioeconomic status — is necessary to learn who is at risk of serious or severe symptoms. 

Some diseases strike certain ethnic groups more than others. People of African descent, Hispanic descent and Middle Eastern descent are more likely to be impacted by sickle cell disease. Some cardiovascular drugs are less effective in people of Asian descent than in those of European origin. 

Studies that include a diverse range of people can identify whether a vaccine would have different safety and efficacy profiles among different racial or ethnic groups. The goal, scientists said, is to develop treatments that work for everyone, even if that means different groups respond better to one treatment over another. 

“Having a clear representation of different minorities in these trials, you can ensure a vaccine is working across populations,” said Alejandro Cané, head of Vaccines Medical and Scientific Affairs at Pfizer. 

On the cultural side, enrolling a diverse range of people during the trial phase can lead to a broader acceptance once a vaccine or treatment is approved and becomes widely used.

“There is an element