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Launch a Global Medical Career with Manipal’s American University of Antigua, College of Medicine

Medical students can be an efficient contingency workforce, provided their lack of training is suitably addressed. Being capable and ready to respond to COVID-19 like pandemic situation needs crucial emphasis on disaster management and emergency medicine. The world is faced with the reality of the shortage of physicians and healthcare providers due to the challenges posed by the current epidemiological peak. From the larger perspective, it is about how the shortage of physicians worldwide is going to impact the global health scenario. A lack of training renders medical students non-essential to patient care; on the other hand, clinical training is essential to generate future responders against COVID-19. What should be the focus of medical institutions and aspiring medical students?

Manipal’s American University of Antigua College of Medicine (AUA) is one such renowned institute in the Caribbean that helps students from different corners of the world to fulfill their dreams of becoming doctors. For nearly two decades, the university is training future physicians and offering a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Gaining Experience in global healthcare is the way forward. AUA provides knowledge on global healthcare through its Global Health Track, which is conducted in collaboration with Florida International University (FIU). The purpose of the Global Health Track is to support and guide students in developing expertise in global health issues with the goal of subsequent career involvement involving patient care, service, policy making, research and education at a global level. 

Not all international medical universities and schools provide the opportunity to practice medicine in the US, Canada, the UK as well as in India. AUA’s curriculum is evaluated regularly to ensure that it is as per the standards of its USA and Canadian counterparts. AUA has collaborations/affiliations with many foreign universities like Florida International University (in the US), The University of Warwick (in the UK), and many others. Surrounded by beautiful nature with warm hospitality received from the people of the Caribbean region, AUA surely stands out to be a place to build a career in medicine and more than 3,000 students of AUA have graduated and are practicing in the US, Canada and the UK.

Manipal’s AUA emphasizes the need for well-rounded doctors. Hence, equal importance is given to the academic performance as well as emotional intelligence. The admission process is holistic that considers more than just the test scores

Alumnus Dr. Nandita Mahajan shares, “If anyone is planning to go for higher education in medicine, they should choose to go to AUA.”

The alumni of Manipal’s AUA stand testimonial to the difference being made by this institution in India as well as India’s contribution to global healthcare. The choice is usually driven by: greener pastures, studying abroad, acquiring a mere medical degree or contributing towards the larger purpose of improving the global healthcare scenario. 

Another alumnus Dr. Nandini Chattopadhyay reminisces, “The teaching that one receives in pre-clinical sciences in AUA, lay the foundation for clinical sciences. Everybody in AUA is always eager to help in

Radford woman started career as dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh.” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Regil.

She had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist, she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have to. I just have to,” said Regil.

Regil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting is a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

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A Radford woman started her career as a dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Teresa Regil.

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Ahe had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said  Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach, and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have too. I just have too,” said Regil.

Rigil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4th.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

Continue Reading

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The advice that shaped Insitro CFO Mary Rozenman’s biotech career

Mary Rozenman initially set out to be a doctor, after watching her sister deal with uncontrolled epilepsy throughout her childhood.

But she realized in college, that blood made her cringe. Instead, Rozenman got her doctorate in organic chemistry and chemical biology from Harvard University. 

Then as a 26-year-old working under David Liu, a gene-editing pioneer, something about drug development didn’t sit right with the young chemist. Among the thousands of new discoveries each year, just a small handful of them make it through the “funnel,” she said.

“I envisioned a funnel, where you have at the top of the funnel all of these amazing discoveries and innovations that sort of move through the system,” Rozenman told Business Insider. 

“And somehow only a small handful of them get filtered into medicines that actually make it out into the real world’s drug supply,” she said.

Rozenman needed to understand how that funnel works, she said. What happened behind the scenes to squelch each year’s hundreds of thousands of breakthroughs, and where did the money come from to advance some things and not others? It led her to consider a career outside of research. 

“I wouldn’t know what the right place for me to participate was because I only understood the top of the funnel and the very bottom, from a patient’s perspective. And that’s why I went to McKinsey,” Rozenman said.

Read more: Meet the 30 young leaders who are forging a new future for healthcare in the pandemic’s shadow

One piece of advice changed Rozenman’s approach to changing the industry

Rozenman joined McKinsey in 2008 with the goal of touching every single piece of the pharmaceutical business from discovery to marketing, she said.

But a year in, Rozenman’s mentor Diem Nguyen of Pfizer, who at the time managed a $10 billion slice of the business, gave her some tough advice. 

“She said ‘You’re really smart and really good. But you’re going to hit a wall in your career unless you learn how to read a P&L,'” Rozenman said.

A profit and loss statement, or income statement, is one of the primary financial statements detailing a company’s revenues and expenses. The advice made Rozenman feel defensive, but at the same time, she was making strategic recommendations to large companies without a sufficient understanding of corporate finance, she said.

So Rozenman carved out a focus area within McKinsey, the intersection of pharma and corporate finance, as consultants there do in order to make partner, she said. In 2012, as a junior partner and leader in the firm’s healthcare practice, she left to use her new skills for Longitude Capital, a $1.2 billion venture capital firm for healthcare startups.

“That was the reason that I actually left the firm to be a venture investor,” Rozenman said. “That was the funnest part for me — thinking about these early stage technologies and how do you actually really push them along, and how much are they worth, and how do you make it happen?”

Reinventing drug