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A Canadian spin studio followed public health guidelines. But 61 people still caught the covid-19.

Now, despite appearing to have complied with public health regulations, at least 61 people linked to the studio have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“They had done all sorts of things to remove the potential for spread,” Richardson told reporters. “Unfortunately, gyms are a higher-risk place because of the fact that generally people are taking off their masks, they’re breathing at a higher rate.”

Although Hamilton requires masks to be worn in most public settings, the law includes an exemption for anyone “actively engaged in an athletic or fitness activity.” In keeping with that policy, the studio, SPINCO, allowed riders to remove their masks once clipped into their bikes, and told them to cover up again before dismounting.

In a recent Instagram post, SPINCO’s owners said that they had been “hesitant” to reopen after getting the green light in July, and would not resume classes “until it is safe to do so.” Health officials have said that the studio is temporarily closed and cooperating fully with the investigation.

“We took all the measures public health offered, even added a few, and still the pandemic struck us again!’” the owners wrote. SPINCO has more than a dozen locations across Canada.

As of Tuesday, 44 cases linked to specific classes were detected, Richardson said. An additional 17 instances of “secondary cases” were found among other contacts.

The city will reexamine gym protocols, Richardson added Tuesday, but in the meantime, “what seems to be the case is that you need to wear that mask” even though government guidelines do not strictly require it.

“It’s still a good idea to do it, in terms of keeping others safe,” she said.

People should also avoid “classes where you’ve got that kind of yelling or coaching over music.”

She declined to use the term “superspreader” to describe the event but said it is a “very large outbreak.”

“It is concerning that it is extended beyond the initial cases who were related to the classes but gone into of course their household contacts and other contacts,” she said. “We continue to look at what does it mean, what do we need to understand about exercise classes?”

The outbreak offers further evidence of the dangers of people gathering indoors without masks, as health experts warn that cases could spike further in the coming months as winter weather sets in and outdoor gatherings and exercise classes will be harder to maintain.

In August, South Korea confirmed dozens of cases linked to a single Starbucks in the city of Paju where many customers did not wear masks. The store employees, who wore masks, were not infected. The outbreak prompted Starbucks to limit its indoor seating in the country and encourage masks among patrons.

In other instances, mask usage has been credited with preventing potential outbreaks. In May, after the reopening of a hair salon in Missouri that required masks, two stylists — who had worked with more than 100 clients — tested positive for the virus. But masks were

Nurse fired after video shows Canadian hospital staff mocking Indigenous patient

A nurse at a Quebec hospital has been fired after a dying Indigenous woman streamed hospital staff mocking her.

The patient, Joyce Echaquan, recorded the footage Monday on Facebook Live while she was at Centre Hospitalier Régional de Lanaudière in Joliette for stomach pains.

In the video, reviewed by NBC News, Echaquan makes noises of extreme discomfort from her hospital bed. Hospital staff can be heard calling her “stupid as hell” in French while one nurse says Echaquan, a mother of seven, is “good at having sex, more than anything else.” Echaquan, 37, died later that day.

The local public health department said it “finds the comments heard in the video circulated on social media unacceptable” and “does not tolerate any such language on the part of its staff within the organization.”

“The investigation is underway, and a nurse has been fired,” the department said, according to NBC News.

The video sparked demonstrations outside the hospital. Quebec’s premier, François Legault, said Tuesday that a task force on racism would “take action” and issue recommendations.

“First, I want to offer my condolences to the family. Second, what happened is totally unacceptable,” he said, according to NBC News.

Perry Bellegarde, the national chief for the Assembly of First Nations, said the incident showed how little progress had been made since a government report last year indicating racism in public health services against Indigenous people.

“One year after the release of the Viens Commission Report, Joyce Echaquan, a young Atikamekv woman died while facing incredibly racist and insensitive taunts by Quebec health care staff,” he tweeted.

Canadian Senator Leo Housakos, who represents Quebec’s Wellington region, tweeted “the lack of human compassion and dignity shown to this mother, daughter, friend, must not be tolerated in our society.”

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KA Imaging’s Portable Dual-energy X-ray Receives Canadian Medical Device Licence from Health Canada

Canadian market comprises more than 1,000 hospitals. Number of medical and diagnostic laboratories (which include x-ray) surpasses 3,000.

A Canadian Medical Device Licence was issued September 24 by Health Canada for Reveal 35C™, created by KA Imaging – a University of Waterloo spin-off company.

Reveal is a portable dual-energy X-ray detector that enables bone and soft-tissue differentiation without motion artifacts in a single X-ray exposure. The detector simultaneously delivers DR, bone, and tissue images in one shot. Reveal can be taken to the bedside of vulnerable patients in hospital and used easily to aid emergency procedures. It is also affordable and comes at a quarter of the price of many fixed dual-energy systems.

“Getting this Health Canada licence is a major step forward for KA Imaging, especially coupled with the recent FDA clearance. As a Canadian company we are thrilled to have received Health Canada’s approval and eagerly anticipate providing our solution to the Canadian market for advance in the field of X-ray,” said Amol Karnick, President and CEO of KA Imaging.

Statistics from the Industry Canada database from 2019 show that there are more than 1,000 hospitals (including general and specialized facilities) in the country, and more than 3,000 medical and diagnostic laboratories – including X-ray services. In addition, because the detector is portable – it is the only portable dual-energy solution on the market – less obvious sectors can also benefit from the technology.

“At long-term care facilities, which care for vulnerable populations that can suffer from mobility limitations or health concerns, taking the detector to the patient can be very beneficial,” said Dr. Karim S. Karim, CTO of KA Imaging.

Reveal is already being used in clinical trials with promising results. The detector is being tested on patients suspected of having lung cancer at Grand River Hospital in Kitchener, and for detection of pneumonia (including COVID-19) in a Toronto-based hospital.

“Early triaging is an essential countermeasure to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infection, and we are confident that our technology can make a significant contribution,” said Karim.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005044/en/

Contacts

Fernanda Fraga
[email protected]
226 215 9897

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