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Crunch Fitness Channelside Renovations To Allow Boutique Classes

TAMPA, FL — Crunch Fitness announced the upgrade of its Channelside location in Downtown Tampa to a Crunch Select Club. The first of its kind in the area, this $200,000 renovation will allow Crunch Channelside to offer its members boutique-style fitness classes as well as increased workout space in the main gym by 20 percent.

The new fitness studio will be located directly across from the main entrance of the main gym in Grand Central to provide classes such as hot yoga, suspended yoga, barre classes and more. The renovations and new studio should be complete by the end of the year.

“Our goal is always to make serious exercise fun while offering a top-quality environment and fitness equipment,” said CEO Vince Julien. “We saw a need in the Channelside District community to revamp our group fitness programming, and we are extremely excited that this renovation will allow us to offer high-value classes at affordable prices.”

Prominent features of the expansion will include:

  • An extra 2,400 square feet of workout space in the main gym

  • A first-class cycle studio with a 100-inch video screen and low-voltage lighting that dances with the music

  • Upgrade the existing group fitness room with new flooring and fitness equipment

  • A new studio with infra-red heat panels, bamboo flooring, backlit mirrors and a stage

  • A new tanning and hydro bed area with two high-performance tanning booths

Crunch Channelside is owned by veteran fitness industry operators Vince Julien, Geoff Dyer, Tony Scrimale and Jeff Dotson, who are confident in the future of fitness and have successfully opened six clubs during the coronavirus pandemic starting in May. This franchisee currently owns and operates a total of 28 Crunch locations in the Tampa Bay community as well as in Orlando and Atlanta.

This article originally appeared on the Tampa Patch

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Equinox’s Variis App Is Making the Best of Boutique Fitness Accessible to All

When Equinox launched Variis—its first foray into digital fitness—earlier this year, it came with one major caveat: In order to access it, you had to either be an Equinox member or shell out $2500 for the SoulCycle at-home bike. As of today, though, the app is officially available to everyone, proving that an accessible blend of in-person and online workouts are officially the wave of the future.

In addition to Variis’s OG streaming workouts (spin classes from SoulCycle, treadmill sessions from Precision Run, yoga flows from PureYoga, and meditation and recovery classes hosted by Equinox trainers), the latest iteration of the platform will also stream classes from Solidcore, Rumble, and TB12, plus real-time, live classes. Or you can tune out and watch Netflix, Amazon, and Disney+.



a woman holding a phone: Variis


© Photo: Getty Images/Oscar Wong
Variis

At $40 a month, Variis pricing is in line with others in the industry (the “all-access” pass required to access Peloton’s spinning and treadmill classes costs $39 a month, while Obé charges $35 a month for its streaming service). If you consider that a single, in-person Solidcore class in New York City costs $32 and a SoulCycle class will run you $36, paying $40 for unlimited access to the digital classes could save you big in the long run. This, it seems, is representative of a larger, industry-wide shift of boutique gyms using affordable digital fitness to make their selections more widely available.

Over the last few months, after stay-at-home orders made living room workouts our only option, Equinox—like many other pricey, cult-fave brands such as Barry’s, AARMY, and SLT—have embraced an omnichannel approach of blending in-person and online classes, and this model is decidedly here to stay.  “I think people were kind of in one camp or the other before…but now it’s not an either/or—it’s what I call a hybrid model,” David Miller, the executive director of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at George Mason University’s School of Business previously told Well+Good. “When you look at what’s emerging, people are now more open [to doing both at-home and in-studio workouts], and are going to mix and match.”

As far as luxury gyms go, Equinox has long been the industry’s gold standard, but its clubs have only been located in major metros. This means that by removing the membership requirement for Variis and shipping the Soul bike nationwide, Equinox has done away with its financial and geographic barriers to entry, placing the brand squarely in competition with other major players in the space—including Peloton.

In the last seven months, Peloton’s stock ticked up more than 345 percent, and its app reportedly saw five times more downloads in March (when gyms in the US were forced to close) than it did in February. It remains to be seen whether or not Variis will see the same sort of success, but considering a 2,009-person survey from TD Ameritrade found that 59 percent of Americans say they don’t plan on renewing their gym memberships even after the pandemic is over,

Huma Mirza, D.D.S. of Smile! Dental Boutique in Warren, New Jersey Named 2020 NJ Top Dentist

SCOTCH PLAINS, N.J., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Huma Mirza, DDS of Smile! Dental Boutique in Warren, New Jersey has been reviewed and approved by NJ Top Dentists for 2020. Dr. Mirza provides a full spectrum of general dentistry and cosmetic dentistry services at her Warren, New Jersey office. She has expertise with porcelain veneers, dental implants, crowns, and bridges.

Dr. Mirza’s key mission as a dentist is to provide her patients with a new, positive outlook on dentistry.

Dr. Mirza graduated from United Medical and Dental School of Guys’, Kings and St Thomas’ in London in 2002. This is one of the most prestigious dental schools in the United Kingdom. She graduated at the top of her class, winning prizes in orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, dental public health, microbiology, immunology, pathology, conservative dentistry, and was entered to win the Gold Medal prize for best dental student in London, in which she achieved the runner up position.

Upon graduating she married and moved to America where she attended NYU College of Dentistry graduating in 2006 with the highest GPA in her class. She was on the Dean’s list for all 3 years at NYU and won the Ethics prize and a certificate of achievement in recognition of outstanding achievements. Dr. Mirza then took part in the honors program in Oral Surgery, and was inducted into the omega chapter of OKU, an elite dental society joined by invitation only. Upon graduating from dental school Dr. Huma has taken extensive continuing education classes to improve her skill range, enabling her to be able to provide an extensive range of treatments for her patients, and helping her keep abreast of new technologies available.

Whether you need a simple filling or a full cosmetic reconstruction, Dr. Mirza has the knowledge, expertise and equipment to meet your needs with the best treatment the industry has to offer.

To learn more about Dr. Huma Mirza and her practice, Smile! Dental Boutique please visit: https://njtopdocs.com/nj-dentists/drhumamirza/

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The boutique fitness experience as we knew it is dead

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the previously-booming boutique fitness industry into crisis, with studios struggling to pay rent as classes remain closed or at limited capacity.
  • Consumers are increasingly pivoting to digital and at-home fitness as companies like Peloton and Mirror, already successful pre-pandemic, have been booming. 
  • Experts say the coronavirus exposed existing vulnerabilities in the boutique fitness industry, but the market for premium in-person fitness experiences will likely adapt and survive through the pandemic. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Flywheel Sports, the revolutionary spin class with a cult following, announced it was permanently closing its doors in September, other studios saw an ominous sign in the world of boutique fitness.

“When it’s as big as Flywheel, that’s when it really gets noticed. That’s exemplifying what’s going to happen over the next 6 months,” said Amanda Freeman, founder of SLT NYC, a pilates studio with locations in several states, including New York and New Jersey.

Flywheel was once widely lauded as a paragon of success, expanding to 42 studios since its founding in 2014. In March, the company laid off 98% of its staff. Flywheel declared bankruptcy September 15, joining the ranks of fitness corporations like Gold’s Gym and New York Sports Club parent company Town International Sports, which have had to permanently shutter locations and liquidate assets in response to pandemic-induced closures.

Six months into the pandemic, the boutique fitness industry is now facing a crisis. 

The business of small, often exclusive or luxury spaces, group exercise classes, and typically a specialization (such as high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, barre, spin, or pilates), has boomed in the past decade.

“The big success was built on that idea that you could have an experience with an individual rockstar trainer or the brand identity and community,” said Jared Kaplan, owner and founder of Studio 26, once called the “WeWork” of fitness, providing a co-working space for fitness professionals. 

“People really identified with the experience they were having rather than being a cog in a big box gym, whether that was a dark class with pumping music or a really serene, meditative studio.”

But that highly successful model of home-away-from-home studios with showers, saunas, and luxe changing rooms may be a thing of the past. Instagram-worthy ambience, amenities, and a trainer that remembers your name may not be enough to entice exercisers back into the studio, given evidence that the virus spreads more easily indoors. 

To compete with the at-home fitness industry that’s booming during the pandemic, boutique fitness has to also adapt to meet clients where they are now, which is increasingly at home. And under intense economic and social pressure, studios that are unable or unwilling to change rapidly may not survive at all. 

Even prior to COVID-19, the industry was being squeezed by platforms like ClassPass, which offered subscribers credits to attend multiple studios, rather than faithfully subscribing to one. While boutique studios typically charge a premium per-class fee, ClassPass leveraged lower prices by helping to