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Riskiest behaviors to avoid during coronavirus pandemic, according to an expert

Despite the fact that some may be experiencing so-called “caution fatigue,” the coronavirus pandemic is still raging, with certain areas across the country — namely the Midwest — seeing a surge in cases and hospitalizations. 

And with autumn officially here, bringing with it flu season, experts are urging the public to remain diligent in taking precautions to protect against both the seasonal illness and the novel virus. 

“Wearing a mask the wrong way. I've seen so many people not cover their nose, or letting it slide up their chin. I'm glad you are wearing a mask but when you wear it wrong, the effectiveness drops dramatically,” Dr. John Whyte said. (iStock)

“Wearing a mask the wrong way. I’ve seen so many people not cover their nose, or letting it slide up their chin. I’m glad you are wearing a mask but when you wear it wrong, the effectiveness drops dramatically,” Dr. John Whyte said. (iStock)

“I know everyone is tired of COVID but now is not the time to give up or go easy on the safeguards,” Dr. John Whyte, the chief medical officer of the health care website WebMD, told Fox News. 

Read on for a look at the worst things to do amid the pandemic, according to Whyte. 

DO YOU HAVE CORONAVIRUS ‘CAUTION FATIGUE’?

Gong to work when you feel unwell 

“Do not be around people —  whether at work or socially — when you aren’t feeling well,” said Whyte. “You could be infectious with COVID even before you test positive so listen to your body.  If you feel lousy, stay home and rest in bed. Don’t go out infecting others.”

Wearing your face mask incorrectly 

“Wearing a mask the wrong way. I’ve seen so many people not cover their nose, or letting it slide up their chin. I’m glad you are wearing a mask but when you wear it wrong, the effectiveness drops dramatically,” he said. 

 Avoid the buffet line 

“Sampling the buffet line” should be avoided, warned Whyte. “You often have to wait until it’s your turn. People are touching the same utensils. I’d wait a while until I’d hit the salad bar.”

THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS MAY INADVERTENTLY FUNCTION AS A PAIN RELIEVER, STUDY SUGGESTS

Going to large events — especially indoors 

“Going to an event of 50 or more people inside, not socially distanced, without masks” is a dangerous game to play, said Whyte. “I know everyone is tired of COVID but now is not the time to give up or go easy on the safeguards.”

Assuming a cure is ‘around the corner’

“Thinking there’s a cure around the corner. Although we have made progress in treatments and various vaccines are in development, you don’t want to let down your guard,” said Whyte. 

CLICK FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE 

Bonus: Avoid this popular Halloween activity

Thrill-seekers should avoid at least one popular Halloween activity this year, said Whyte: haunted houses. 

“It’s dark, crowded, and people are screaming. The chances of getting COVID-19 just aren’t worth it this year,” he said. 

Source Article

Coronavirus spikes are ‘driven more by our behaviors,’ doctor explains

Parts of the U.S. are experiencing spikes in coronavirus cases over the last several weeks, and experts fear it will only get worse as flu season begins.

“I’m reluctant to assign any of this to a change in the virus itself,” Dr. Seth Trueger, an emergency medicine physician based out of Chicago, said on Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker (video above). “It almost certainly is driven more by our behaviors and how we’re interacting with each other.”

The most prominent example of new transmission is President Trump, who tested positive for the virus and is now hospitalized as he recovers. The president, who has held public rallies and largely avoids wearing a mask, has been vocal about states reopening as soon as possible to help their struggling economies.

President Donald Trump holds up his facemask during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
President Donald Trump holds up his facemask during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

‘Really troubling’

Several states are seeing a new rise in the number of cases.

“This is really troubling,” Trueger said. “But unfortunately, it’s not really unexpected. What we’re seeing is a combination of a number of things. As weather gets colder, people are going to spend more time inside, and we know that indoors transmission is certainly higher than outdoors or in other places, especially as people spend more time with each other.” 

The Pacific northwest is seeing a surge in cases. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)
The Pacific northwest is seeing a surge in cases. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

Indoor dining has resumed in nearly every state, including New Jersey and New York City, two areas that had the most number of cases early on in the pandemic. In several states, capacity is limited to 25% but even that can spell trouble if safety guidelines aren’t properly followed, including keeping tables six feet apart, mandating masks for all staff and customers not eating, and keeping bar areas shut down. 

“This is hard for all of us,” Trueger added. “We’ve been doing this for months. And it’s really easy to let things slide. It’s really easy for that fatigue to set in, where: ‘Do I really need to wear my mask?’ We’ve been doing this for so long. ‘Is it time to have my kids do play dates? Is it time to go out to bars?’”

A bar manager at The Jackalope talks with agents from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission as they check that bars are maintaining social distancing protocols to help slow the spread of the coronavirus in Austin, Texas, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona
A bar manager at The Jackalope talks with agents from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission as they check that bars are maintaining social distancing protocols to help slow the spread of the coronavirus in Austin, Texas, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona

Some states that reopened too quickly had to revert back to their restrictions after seeing a surge in cases. 

“Just because we’re all exhausted from it doesn’t mean that it’s safe to do it,” Trueger said. “A lot of states are starting to do things like barge ahead because they want the economy to rebound. They want people to be doing better. But unfortunately, until we get the virus under control, it’s not going to be safe to open things up.” 

Bars, movie theaters, and