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Dentist reveals how much toothpaste you should REALLY be using based on your age & you’re definitely getting it wrong

ANY parent will know getting kids to brush their teeth can be an ordeal, but it turns out you’ve probably been giving them way too much toothpaste. 

A dentist, Dr Gao, has gone viral on TikTok after sharing a video outlining how much toothpaste we should be using – according to our age. 

A dentist claimed the amount of toothpaste used in adverts is way too much

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A dentist claimed the amount of toothpaste used in adverts is way too muchCredit: Tik Tok

Dr Gao’s clip has racked up more than six million views, as he pointed out the lashings of toothpaste used in adverts was excessive. 

He said: “The amount used in commercials is way too much. 

“For ages three and below, all a smear is all you need.”

He demonstrated with a tiny amount spread on a brush, before saying: “For anyone older, a pea size amount is plenty.” 

Dr Gao shared a clip on TikTok explaining the right amounts to use which quickly went viral

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Dr Gao shared a clip on TikTok explaining the right amounts to use which quickly went viralCredit: Tik Tok

Dr Gao explained why you shouldn’t squeeze loads on your brush, saying: “Trust me it doesn’t make your teeth any cleaner.”

And it can lead to dental problems, particularly for children. 

In a separate video, he said: “Not only is it a waste for children whose adult teeth are still developing, swallowing too much toothpaste that contains fluoride can cause dental fluorosis. 

He claimed a smear is all you need for kids under the age of three

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He claimed a smear is all you need for kids under the age of threeCredit: Tik Tok

“Dental fluorosis is a cosmetic condition that causes a change in the appearance in the tooth and enamel.

“The appearance can range from brown and light discoloration,to brown strains and even obvious pits.”

While it can be ‘cosmetically treated’, Dr Gao warned the damage was permanent. 

Parents will know the battle of getting children to brush their teeth

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Parents will know the battle of getting children to brush their teethCredit: Tik Tok

Thousands of people commented on the clip in shock, admitting they’ve been getting it wrong their whole life. 

One person said: “Thinking of all the toothpaste I’ve wasted.”

Another wrote: “That’s why electric brushes can only hold pea size toothpaste.” 

Anyone older than that should use a pea-sized amount - and no more

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Anyone older than that should use a pea-sized amount – and no more Credit: Tik Tok

A third commented: “My friends were surprised when I only used that much. I was right all along.” 

Someone else thought: “We’ve been mislead by advertisement all these years.” 

While another said: “Finally! I’ve been trying to tell my husband for ages.”

Thousands of people commented on the post in shock as they realised they've been getting their amounts wrong

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Thousands of people commented on the post in shock as they realised they’ve been getting their amounts wrong

Expert Breast Cancer Treatment Recommendations Based on Latest Evidence Updating for Multiple Languages

Expert Breast Cancer Treatment Recommendations Based on Latest Evidence Updating for Multiple Languages

PR Newswire

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., Oct. 5, 2020

Ongoing updates are underway for NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer in Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Polish, and Portuguese, free online at NCCN.org/global. Follow #NCCNGlobal for more.

NCCN Foundation is hosting free metastatic breast cancer webinars for patients and caregivers on October 8 and 12 at NCCN.org/patients.

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — During Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) is sharing and updating evidence- and expert consensus-based management recommendations which lead to optimal outcomes for people with breast cancer.1 Translations of the English-language NCCN Guidelines® for Breast Cancer have recently been updated in Chinese, Japanese, and Spanish. The currently-available Korean, French, Polish, and Portuguese versions will be updated by the end of the month. All are free at NCCN.org/global.

NCCN Guidelines® for Breast Cancer in Chinese, French, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish.
NCCN Guidelines® for Breast Cancer in Chinese, French, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish.

“Breast cancer has a very high cure rate, but remains the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death for women worldwide,” said Robert W. Carlson, MD, Chief Executive Officer, NCCN and Professor of Medicine (Emeritus), Stanford University Medical Center, who specialized in breast cancer. “We want health care providers everywhere to have access to the carefully-vetted treatment recommendations included in the NCCN Guidelines. That’s why we’re always looking for ways to increase the readability and accessibility of these resources.”

NCCN also adapts NCCN Guidelines into tiered and pragmatic approaches for varying resource availability in low- and middle-income countries, called the NCCN Framework for Resource Stratification of NCCN Guidelines (NCCN Framework™). There are also International Adaptations of the NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and Spain, as well as NCCN Harmonized GuidelinesTM for Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, all written in collaboration with regional oncology experts.

The NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer have also served as the basis for creation of three volumes of NCCN Guidelines for Patients®, to help cancer patients talk with their physicians about the best treatment options for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), Invasive Breast Cancer, and Metastatic Breast Cancer.

“We are expanding our knowledge of this disease at a rapid pace,” said William J. Gradishar, MD, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chair, NCCN Guidelines Panel for Breast Cancer. “We’ve made six updates to the main breast cancer guidelines already this year. They include multiple new treatment recommendations covering management, staging, and special circumstances such as pregnancy.”

NCCN also has separate guidelines on topics like screening, genetic/familial risk assessment, risk reduction, and supportive care.

The NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer were downloaded more than 890,000 times in 2019, making it the most-downloaded NCCN guideline across all cancer types. At least 335,000 of those downloads came from outside the United States