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Wisconsin restaurant installs virus-killing lights in its dining room, bar area

A Wisconsin restaurant is installing lights that reportedly kill airborne viruses

The Blind Horse Restaurant & Winery in Kohler, Wisconsin, is reportedly the first restaurant in the U.S. to install far-UVC light technology, according to a press release. 

Healthe, Inc., a Florida-based company, made the lights — called “Healthe Space” lights — which “provide real-time mitigation of harmful pathogens and viruses,” the release said.

According to the company, the lights are mounted on the ceiling and give off general light as well as “far-UVC 222 sanitizing light to clean air and surfaces.”

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Eighteen of the Healthe Space lights are being installed throughout the restaurant, in the dining and bar areas, as well as in other buildings on the property.  

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“Of utmost importance to us is that we provide a safe environment so our guests and employees have the opportunity to feel a sense of normalcy and well-being that has been shaken by COVID-19,” Thomas Nye, The Blind Horse’s general manager and master winemaker, said in a statement. 

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“Real time mitigation of the virus has been our goal since this crisis began,” Nye added. “The suite of safety protocols and technology that we are installing is extensive and unprecedented in our industry. Our customers have come to expect The Blind Horse to be a leader, and we are proud to be at the forefront in utilizing this technology in the restaurant and winery industry.”   

A restaurant in Wisconsin is installing virus-killing lights in its dining room. (iStock)

A restaurant in Wisconsin is installing virus-killing lights in its dining room. (iStock)

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In June, researchers from Columbia University Irving Medical Center found that far-UVC light kills the coronavirus safely, without harming human tissue. 

According to the study, which was published in “Scientific Reports” — 99.9% of two coronaviruses that were exposed to far-UVC light were killed.

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“The Blind Horse is exhausting all procedures, products and processes to create a safer hospitality experience and to lessen the impact of our current climate,” Nye said. “Everyone is seeking a positive way forward to inspire our struggling industry. The cost, especially for a small business, is daunting. Our customers and staff appreciate all the time, money and effort to create a safer environment.”

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Aside from the new lights, The Blind Horse has also implemented other health technologies including ultraviolet lighting treatments, improved air systems and ozone treatments at night. Servers at The Blind Horse also wear copper woven masks that have an additional layer of “antimicrobial protection,” the release said.

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A woman finished the Bar exam after having her baby between sections of the test

Brianna Hill, a recent graduate of the Loyola University School of Law in Chicago, knew she would be pregnant during her bar exam, but she wasn’t expecting a huge curveball in timing due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“I thought I would only be 28 weeks pregnant when I took the bar,” Hill told CNN. “However, due to the pandemic, the test was pushed to October and I was going to be 38 weeks. I joked about taking the test from my hospital bed. Lesson learned!”

The remote version of the test is four 90-minute sections spread out over two days. Hill said the exam is proctored so you have to sit in front of the computer the entire time to make sure you aren’t cheating.

“I thought I felt something about 30 minutes into the test and actually thought, ‘I really hope my water didn’t just break,'” Hill said. “But I couldn’t go check and so I finished the first section. As soon as I stood up when I finished, I knew my water had broken.”

But even the realization of going into labor didn’t stop Hill from accomplishing her goal.

“I took my break, got myself cleaned up, called my husband, midwife, and mom, cried because I was a little panicked, then sat down to take the second part because my midwife told me I had time before I needed to go to the hospital.”

Hill said she got to the hospital around 5:30 p.m. and her new baby boy arrived just after 10 p.m.

“The whole time my husband and I were talking about how we wanted me to finish the test and my midwife and nurses were so on board. There just wasn’t another option in my mind,” Hill said.

So, the next day, hospital staff provided Hill with an empty room to finish the test and put a “Do Not Disturb” sign on the door. Hill took the rest of the exam in that room and even nursed her baby during breaks.

“I’m so thankful for the support system I had around me. The midwives and nurses were so invested in helping me not only become a mom but also a lawyer,” Hill said.

“My husband and law school friends provided me with so much encouragement so I could push through the finish line even under less than ideal circumstances. And my family, especially my sister, just kept reminding me how I could do it even when I wasn’t so sure myself.”

Hill hasn’t received her bar exam results, but she already has a job lined up.

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