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A woman finished the Bar exam after having her baby between sections of the test

Brianna Hill, a recent graduate of the Loyola University School of Law in Chicago, knew she would be pregnant during her bar exam, but she wasn’t expecting a huge curveball in timing due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“I thought I would only be 28 weeks pregnant when I took the bar,” Hill told CNN. “However, due to the pandemic, the test was pushed to October and I was going to be 38 weeks. I joked about taking the test from my hospital bed. Lesson learned!”

The remote version of the test is four 90-minute sections spread out over two days. Hill said the exam is proctored so you have to sit in front of the computer the entire time to make sure you aren’t cheating.

“I thought I felt something about 30 minutes into the test and actually thought, ‘I really hope my water didn’t just break,'” Hill said. “But I couldn’t go check and so I finished the first section. As soon as I stood up when I finished, I knew my water had broken.”

But even the realization of going into labor didn’t stop Hill from accomplishing her goal.

“I took my break, got myself cleaned up, called my husband, midwife, and mom, cried because I was a little panicked, then sat down to take the second part because my midwife told me I had time before I needed to go to the hospital.”

Hill said she got to the hospital around 5:30 p.m. and her new baby boy arrived just after 10 p.m.

“The whole time my husband and I were talking about how we wanted me to finish the test and my midwife and nurses were so on board. There just wasn’t another option in my mind,” Hill said.

So, the next day, hospital staff provided Hill with an empty room to finish the test and put a “Do Not Disturb” sign on the door. Hill took the rest of the exam in that room and even nursed her baby during breaks.

“I’m so thankful for the support system I had around me. The midwives and nurses were so invested in helping me not only become a mom but also a lawyer,” Hill said.

“My husband and law school friends provided me with so much encouragement so I could push through the finish line even under less than ideal circumstances. And my family, especially my sister, just kept reminding me how I could do it even when I wasn’t so sure myself.”

Hill hasn’t received her bar exam results, but she already has a job lined up.

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Having a baby later in life may increase longevity, study suggests

Women who have kids later on in life may live longer, according to the findings of a recent study.

Following the birth of a woman’s last child, certain measurements may be linked with her projected lifespan, according to a study published Wednesday in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

More specifically, leukocyte telomere length – telomeres “are repeating DNA-protein complexes that protect the ends of chromosomes and have proven to be critical for maintaining genomic stability,” per a news release on the findings – may play a role in a woman’s longevity. A woman’s age at the birth of her last child may affect telomere length, ultimately impacting long-term health, the researchers said.

Longer telomeres are thought to be beneficial for long-term health, while shorter ones can signify “various chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some neurologic conditions, and various cancers,” past studies have suggested, according to the news release.

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At least one previous study has suggested that a woman’s age at the birth of her last child affected telomere length, said researchers. The study published Wednesday was larger, including more than 1,200 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women of “various ethnicities and backgrounds.”

“In addition, unlike previous studies, this study took into consideration sociodemographic factors related to childbearing patterns and health decisions,” per the release.

The researchers who conducted the new study found that a woman’s age at the birth of her final child “is positively associated with telomere length, meaning that women who delivered their last child later in life were likely to have longer telomeres, a biomarker of long-term health and longevity.”

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However, “more research is needed to determine whether older maternal age at last birth causes telomeres to lengthen or whether telomere length serves as a proxy for general health and corresponds with a woman’s ability to have a child at a later age,” said Dr. Stephanie Faubion, NAMS medical director, in a statement.

The findings were also limited to women who had one or two live births or those who had used birth control orally, they said.

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Johnson & Johnson Paying Over $100 Million To Settle Baby Powder Lawsuits: Report

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) appears to be reaching deep into its coffers to settle a clutch of lawsuits. According to an article published on Monday by Bloomberg and citing “people with knowledge of the pacts,” the healthcare giant has agreed to pay over $100 million to settle more than 1,000 lawsuits over its Johnson’s Baby Powder.

The lawsuits, some of which stretch back several years, allege that repeated use of the talc-based powder caused cancer. Some claimants say that the product is tainted with asbestos, a substance notorious for causing the illness.

That $100 million would only be an initial outlay; according to regulatory filings, the total number of lawsuits pending is around 20,000. Several have already been resolved, with substantial awards. One, completed in 2018, saw a court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4.7 billion, although this was significantly reduced to $2.1 billion on appeal. Other lawsuits have been dismissed.

“In certain circumstances, we do choose to settle lawsuits, which is done without an admission of liability and in no way changes our position regarding the safety of our products,” Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman Kim Montagnino wrote in an email statement quoted by Bloomberg.

The company has maintained from the start of the Johnson’s Baby Powder controversy that its product is not carcinogenic. It isn’t wavering on that stance. “Our talc is safe, does not contain asbestos, and does not cause cancer,” Montagnino added in her statement.

Johnson & Johnson Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a Missouri jury to pay over $110 million to a Virginia woman after she developed ovarian cancer from using its talc-based products, May 4, 2017. In this photo, a Johnson & Johnson logo at Safe Kids Day 2016 at Smashbox Studios in Los Angeles, California, April 24, 2016. Photo: Getty Images

This article originally appeared in the Motley Fool.

Eric Volkman has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Johnson & Johnson. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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Israeli baby formula maker Else to complete share offering this week

TEL AVIV (Reuters) – Israel’s Else Nutrition BABY.V, which has developed a plant-based infant formula not made from soy, plans to complete a C$25.7 million ($19.3 million) private placement of its shares this week, its chief executive said.

Shareholder H&H International Holding 1112.HK of Hong Kong has bought 11.6% of the shares offered, while Canaccord Genuity CF.TO has taken the rest to sell to investors, Else CEO Hamutal Yitzhak told Reuters.

Else’s formula, made from almonds, buckwheat and tapioca, is organic, vegan and gluten free. Many babies allergic to cow’s milk are also allergic to soy-based formula, Yitzhak said.

“Currently cow’s milk accounts for more than 90% of the market and soy protein for less than 10%,” she said.

Almond is 10 times less allergenic than cow’s milk among babies, according to a 201‮8‬ U.S. allergy prevalence study, said Yitzhak, former head of infant nutrition at Abbott Labs Israel.

Else is seeking a place in the global baby formula market, which is expected to reach nearly $100 billion in 2024 from about $80 billion in 2020, she added.

A month ago Else launched a product online aimed at toddlers in the United States, where it plans this month to start selling its formula through KeHE Distributors, a supplier of chains such as Target and Walmart, and through other distributors.

Else, which is also developing nutrition for adults, will distribute through H&H in China and in Europe, starting in France.

The company need only comply with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations to market its product for toddlers, but must complete a clinical trial to sell formula for infants under 12 months.

“We are working on an FDA pathway, which will take us about two years,” Yitzhak said.

($1 = 1.3300 Canadian dollars)

Reporting by Tova Cohen; Editing by Jan Harvey

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