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Jasmine Food Named Their 16th Consecutive “Malaysia’s Reader’s Digest Most Trusted Brand Award”

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Amidst the current unprecedented time of economic downturn due to the Covid-19 outbreak, Jasmine Food Corporation (Jasmine) Sdn Bhd has demonstrated its sustainable performance as evidenced by 10th consecutive years of receiving awards by Reader’s Digest. The 2020 accolade saw Jasmine awarded with “Platinum Trusted Brand” in the Rice category among other Rice Brand in Malaysia. 

Jasmine Food supports Pusat Darah Negara’s (PDN) Blood Donation Drive
Jasmine Food supports Pusat Darah Negara’s (PDN) Blood Donation Drive

“We have established our presence for more than 5 decades as one of the leading rice market producers and distributors in Malaysia. We are proud of the awards that we have received for so many years. The awards, for us, is encouragement to enhance our trusted brand to keep providing the highest quality of our healthy rice variants,” Lim Swee Keat, CEO of Jasmine Food Corporation, explained.

Lim also concerns about healthy eating lifestyle. For that reason, Jasmine provides rice produced through the right cultivation that can grow healthy products. “Among our products range in the list are fragrant, basmathi, calrose, health rice, glutinous rice, rice vermicelli, and we also have imported white rice.”

Innovation is one crucial element that also attributes to the success of Jasmine, which is evidenced by the production of innovative products such as long grain basmathi rice. This type of low-fat and low carbohydrate rice contains a low level of glycemic index, protein, calcium and vitamins. Hence, Jasmine has won the trust and support achieved by partnering with the country’s health institute, Tung Shin Hospital, National Blood Donation Centre (PDN), National Diabetic Association, and National Heart Institute or Institute Jantung Negara (IJN).

“We became a subsidiary Padiberas Nasional Bhd (Bernas) in 1996 and have ever since imported a wide variety of rice from Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Pakistan, Australia, and USA to cater to diverse needs of customers from various countries,” Lim added.

Reader’s Digest has for 22 consecutive years held such a prestigious accolade to gain insights into customers’ views and trusted brands, based on trustworthiness and credibility, quality, value, understanding of customer needs, innovation, and social responsibility. The insights were collected from around 8,000 individuals from five countries/regions, including Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Philippines.  Platinum Trusted Brand Awards were given to brands that topped their category with an overwhelmingly higher score than their nearest competitor.

The trustworthiness, quality and credibility are also proven through Jasmine Rice’s money-back guarantee policy. Choose Jasmine products today, because you can trust in its quality and consistency.

For more information, visit: http://www.jasmine.com.my/ or https://www.facebook.com/jasminefoodcorporation

Photo – https://photos.prnasia.com/prnh/20201009/2927709-1

SOURCE Jasmine Food

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Knopp Biosciences NIH-Funded Pain Program Advances to Second Year of HEAL Award to Discover Non-Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain

Knopp Biosciences LLC today announced that it entered the second year of research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to utilize its Kv7 platform to discover and develop non-opioid therapies for the treatment of chronic pain. The project is funded by the NIH program called Helping to End Addiction Long-term (the NIH HEAL Initiative), which aims to improve treatments for chronic pain, curb the rates of opioid use disorder and overdose, and achieve long-term recovery from opioid addiction.

Knopp has developed a discovery platform of proprietary molecules directed to a non-opioid biological target linked to chronic pain caused by damage to nerves. The drug target is a cellular membrane potassium channel called Kv7.2/7.3, which regulates the flow of electrically charged ions required to modulate the excitability of cells. Growing scientific evidence suggests that selectively activating key Kv7 channel subtypes can control nerve-cell hyperexcitability associated with chronic pain.

“Knopp is pleased that the achievement of year one milestones positioned the company to continue research on solutions for this public health crisis,” said Michael Bozik, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Knopp. “In year two, we expect to identify a molecule from our Kv7 platform that is suitable for further development as a potential non-opioid treatment for patients suffering from certain types of chronic pain.”

The grant funding of as much as $8 million is contingent upon the attainment of milestones over five years. Knopp’s HEAL award was one of 375 grants made across 41 states in fiscal year 2019 to apply scientific solutions to help reverse the national opioid crisis.

Knopp’s Kv7 research is supported in part under Award Number U44NS093160 and Award Number U44NS115732 of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the NIH. The content of this announcement is solely the responsibility of Knopp and does not necessarily represent the views of the NIH.

ABOUT KNOPP BIOSCIENCES LLC

Knopp Biosciences is a privately held drug discovery and development company focused on delivering breakthrough treatments for immunological and neurological diseases of high unmet need. Knopp’s clinical-stage oral small molecule, dexpramipexole, is in Phase 2 clinical trials in moderate-to-severe eosinophilic asthma. Knopp’s preclinical Kv7 platform is directed to small molecule treatments for developmental and epileptic encephalopathies, other rare epilepsies, neuropathic pain, and tinnitus. Please visit www.knoppbio.com.

ABOUT THE NIH HEAL INITIATIVE

The Helping to End Addiction Long-termSM Initiative, or NIH HEAL InitiativeSM, is an aggressive, trans-NIH effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis. Launched in April 2018, the initiative is focused on improving prevention and treatment strategies for opioid misuse and addiction, and enhancing pain management. For more information, visit: https://heal.nih.gov.

This press release contains “forward-looking statements,” including statements relating to planned regulatory filings and clinical development programs. All forward-looking statements are based on management’s current assumptions and expectations and involve risks, uncertainties and other important factors, specifically including the uncertainties inherent in clinical trials and product development programs, the availability of funding to support continued research

Man Wins $$Award for Unauthorized Penis Surgery; More

Medical Battery: Patient and Proxy Didn’t Agree to Penis Mass Excision

A California appeals court has confirmed a multimillion dollar judgment awarded to a man who sustained injuries following penis surgery neither he nor his medical proxy consented to, according to a story posted on Legal Newsline.

In 2014, Keith Burchell went to Loma Linda University Medical Center, in Loma Linda, California, to have a small scrotal mass removed for testing. The outpatient procedure was supposed to be a relatively simple one.

During the procedure, however, Burchell’s surgeon, of Faculty Physicians and Surgeons of the Loma Linda University School of Medicine (FPS), discovered that the mass was more extensive than his presurgical exams had indicated, involving not only Burchell’s scrotum but his penis as well.

Believing this larger tumor to be malignant — and convinced that even a benign one of this size posed a potential risk should it continue to grow — the surgeon elected to remove the total mass. In the process, he excised tissue not only from his patient’s scrotum but also his penis, a procedure known as a “resection of the proximal corpora.” Such a resection, the physician understood, would almost certainly cause his patient to become impotent.

Despite this, the surgeon went ahead without further consultation with either his patient (who was under anesthesia) or his patient’s designated proxy, his ex-wife. (Because he’d failed to read the entire consent form, Baker was apparently unaware that Burchell had designated his ex-wife to be his proxy.)

The excised mass turned out to be benign, but Burchell experienced substantial postsurgical side effects. Some of these — including an infection that required emergency treatment — were temporary and ultimately resolved. Other effects, though, have proven more intractable, including difficulty urinating in the standing position, constant pain and numbness, and impotence. Two reconstructive surgeries — one in 2015, another the following year — have alleviated the pain somewhat but have “only partially and unsatisfactorily” resolved Burchell’s erectile problems.

In his suit against the medical group, FPS, Burchell alleged both professional negligence and what’s known in the law as “medical battery,” which in California can be of two kinds. The kind most relevant in the Burchell case is when a doctor obtains patient consent to perform one type of procedure but ends up performing a “substantially different” type for which no consent has been obtained.

The trial jury sided with Burchell, awarding him $4 million for past noneconomic loses, $5,250,000 for future noneconomic loses, and roughly $22,000 in economic damages.

FPS appealed, arguing, among other things, that the state’s long-standing cap on noneconomic damages — the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) (1975) — should limit the plaintiff’s noneconomic damages to no more than $250,000.

The appeals court disagreed. It would have been one thing, the justices said, had the surgeon, in the course of treating the patient, encountered a complication requiring a procedure for which the patient had not consented but that nevertheless constituted a life-threatening emergency requiring immediate attention.

Colorado Medical Waste Receives Environmental Leadership Award

An Environmental Leader in the State of Colorado going above and beyond environmental compliance

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability awards Colorado Medical Waste with the Environmental Leadership Program Silver Award. The ELP is a statewide environmental recognition and reward program for facilities that voluntarily go above and beyond compliance of state and federal regulations and are committed to continual environmental improvement for their business and communities as well.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201007005268/en/

The ELP logo stencil was sprayed at their facility in Aurora along with a photo taken of available employees. (Photo: Business Wire)

A video by Colorado Governor Jared Polis was presented to virtually celebrate the program’s new members. The ELP logo stencil was sprayed at their facility in Aurora along with a photo taken of available employees.

Inclusion in the CDPHE Environmental Leadership Program was awarded to Colorado Medical Waste for demonstrating its commitment to:

Using the natural oxidizing power of ozone, electricity, and an industrial shredder, waste volume is reduced by 90% to a sterile confetti residual with “ZERO” emissions as ozone reverts back to simple oxygen. Tons of medical waste streams are diverted from landfills, incinerators, and hazardous waste facilities. State of the art processes and technologies reduce the public health effects and environmental impact of traditional autoclave and incineration technologies. Efficacy tests prove ozone is 100x more effective than steam and an environmental alternative to incineration. Reduction of landfilled medical waste and incineration decreases methane greenhouse gas emissions and their contribution to global warming and climate change. Colorado Medical Waste and ozone processing bring medical waste management into the 21st century.

Beverly Hanstrom, the company CEO and owner says, “We are leading the industry and are at the forefront of environmental stewardship to reduce the carbon footprint of healthcare and medical waste. Our leadership raises awareness and exemplifies our passion and commitment to make a difference.”

Find us on:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColoradoMedicalWaste
Twitter: https://twitter.com/COmedwaste

Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e9TxcTAO0c
Photos – https://www.coloradomedicalwaste.com/press-media/

Related Links:

Environmental Leadership Program: https://www.colorado.gov/cdphe/environmental-leadership-program
Environmental Leadership Brochure: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RQq1EHIippch2lVgsn0C95ZDzHyll7wi/view?usp=sharing

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201007005268/en/

Contacts

Beverly Hanstrom, CEO/Owner
Colorado Medical Waste, Inc.
3131 Oakland St.
Aurora, CO 80010
303-794-5716
(303) 763-2339 Fax
Website: www.coloradomedicalwaste.com
Email: [email protected]aste.com
Links: Brochure | Video | LinkedIn

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3 win Nobel medicine award for hepatitis C virus discovery

FILE - In this April 17, 2015, file photo, a national library employee shows a gold Nobel Prize medal in Bogota, Colombia. The Nobels, with new winners announced starting Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, often concentrate on unheralded, methodical, basic science.

FILE – In this April 17, 2015, file photo, a national library employee shows a gold Nobel Prize medal in Bogota, Colombia. The Nobels, with new winners announced starting Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, often concentrate on unheralded, methodical, basic science.

AP

Americans Harvey J. Alter and Charles M. Rice, and British scientist Michael Houghton were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology on Monday for the discovery of the hepatitis C virus.

Announcing the prize in Stockholm on Monday, the Nobel Committee noted that the trio’s work helped explain a major source of blood-borne hepatitis that couldn’t be explained by the hepatitis A and B viruses. Their work make possible blood tests and new medicines that have saved millions of lives, the committee said.

“Thanks to their discovery, highly sensitive blood tests for the virus are now available and these have essentially eliminated post-transfusion hepatitis in many parts of the world, greatly improving global health,” the committee said.

“Their discovery also allowed the rapid development of antiviral drugs directed at hepatitis C,” it added. “For the first time in history, the disease can now be cured, raising hopes of eradicating hepatitis C virus from the world population.”

The World Health Organization estimates there are over 70 million cases of hepatitis worldwide and 400,000 deaths each year. The disease is chronic and a major cause of liver inflammation and cancer.

The prestigious Nobel award comes with a gold medal and prize money of 10 million Swedish kronor (over $1,118,000), courtesy of a bequest left 124 years ago by the prize’s creator, Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel.

The medicine prize carried particular significance this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has highlighted the importance that medical research has for societies and economies around the world.

The Nobel Committee often recognizes basic science that has laid the foundations for practical applications in common use today.

The award is the first of six prizes being announced through Oct. 12. The other prizes are for outstanding work in the fields of physics, chemistry, literature, peace and economics.

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Week of Nobel Prize announcement begins with medicine award

STOCKHOLM (AP) — The 2020 Nobel Prizes kick off Monday with the naming of the winner, or winners, in the field of physiology and medicine.

A panel at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm will announce the recipient some time after 11:30 a.m. (0930 GMT).

The medicine prize carries particular significance this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has highlighted the importance that medical research has for societies and economies around the world. However, it is unlikely that the winners will have been directly involved in researching the new virus, as the prize usually goes to discoveries made many years or even decades ago.

Often the Nobel Assembly recognizes basic science that has laid the foundations for practical applications in common use today.

It is common for several scientists who worked in the same field to share the prize. Last year, British scientist Peter Ratcliffe and Americans William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza received the award for discovering details of how the body’s cells sense and react to low oxygen levels.


The prestigious award comes with a gold medal and prize money of 10 million Swedish kronor (over $1,118,000), courtesy of a bequest left 124 years ago by the prize’s creator, Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel. The amount was increased recently to adjust for inflation.

The other prizes are physics, chemists, literature, peace and economics.

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Read more stories about Nobel Prizes past and present by The Associated Press at https://www.apnews.com/NobelPrizes

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Medicine prize to open Nobel award week

The annual Nobel Prize announcements begin on Monday – amid the coronavirus pandemic – with the award in Medicine opening the week.

The notification by the Karolinska Institute’s Nobel Assembly is due at the earliest by 11.30 am local time (0830 AEDT).

Laureates in physics, chemistry, literature and peace are also due to be announced in the coming week, followed by economics next week.

With the exception of economics, the prizes were endowed by Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel (1833-96), the inventor of dynamite.

This year, each prize is worth 10 million kronor ($A1.5 million), an increase from the 9 million kronor in recent years.

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901.

Last year US-born researchers William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza and British scientist Peter Ratcliffe were awarded for their work on cells’ use of oxygen.

The actual awards – comprising a medal and a diploma – will be presented on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel’s death.

Organisers have earlier said that due to the pandemic, laureates in science, literature and peace are likely to receive their awards in their respective home countries instead of travelling to Stockholm for the award ceremony.

The Peace Prize ceremony in the Norwegian capital of Oslo has been moved to a smaller venue with fewer guests.

This year’s peace laureate or laureates will either be presented in person or asked to participate in an online event, organisers said.

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