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V-Form trainer invented by Aussie businessman launching in Australia

When the world went into lockdown, anyone with a fitness studio membership had to figure out how to adapt at home.

People borrowed weights from their gym, or hired reformer Pilates machines that took up space in their lounge room, but ultimately you couldn’t recreate a whole studio experience at home.

Now you can – with a new machine that loads up to 200kg – the equivalent of a whole rack of weights in a gym.

The Perth father-of-three behind the Vitruvian Form came up with the idea back in 2008.

Jon Gregory was a high frequency trader for hedge funds and banks who had a degree in applied physics.

“We had a gym in the back of our trading room which we’d use when the markets were quiet,” he said.

“That was the genesis of the idea, thinking we should be able to do much better than just pushing metal around.

“We started thinking about it, taking about it. We called it the torture machine.”

The V-Form resistance trainer is driven by intelligent algorithmic technology, with the device modifying weight loading to match the user’s ability, during their performance at the time and based on workout history, enabling them to train more effectively.

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After learning about how such a machine would have to work, Mr Gregory didn’t take the idea much further.

“I thought I didn’t really want to make gym equipment,” he said.

“It seemed like a horrible business idea. I was a bit down on it but in 2016, for me it was seeing Peleton for the first time and thinking those guys have cracked how to turn a product into a subscription business.”

Peleton is an internet-connected indoor cycling bike that’s grown in popularity since its first machine sold in 2014.

It’s based on a subscription model offering live and on-demand classes, just as the V-Form will be.

“At the same time I was looking at the rise of social media and the rise of the fitness influencer,” Mr Gregory continued.

“There were sporty, attractive people gaining lots of influence and not having a way to monetise that.

“In a light bulb there was a device that connected the influencers and PTs of the world to people in their homes. That was the vision.”

Mr Gregory continued with proof of concepts in 2016 in his shed but it wasn’t until January last year that things really kicked off with a $100,000 angel investment.

“That was the catalyst for me to go, right, lets do this,” he said.

“It wasn’t so much the money, it was the encouragement and motivation that they backed me without much to go on. That was the pivotal moment.”

In June the company ran a pre-sale campaign, kind of like an internal Kickstarter campaign, to test the appetite for the device and the pricing and “see if the world was ready”.

They pre-sold 300

A woman in Australia discovered her headaches were caused by tapeworm larvae in her brain

The aches were caused by tapeworm larvae that had taken up space in her brain, according to a new study on her case by the The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene published on September 21.

The woman, who never traveled overseas, is the first native case of the disease in Australia, the study said. Previous Australian cases of this infection were from immigrants or returning residents who traveled to regions where the disease is endemic to, such as Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

For the past seven years, the woman complained of headaches that would occur two- or three-times a month and went away with prescribed migraine medication. However, her latest headache lasted for more than a week and came with more severe visual symptoms, including the blurring of her central vision.

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An MRI of her brain led doctors to believe that a tumor might be the cause of her pain, but after operating and removing the lesion, they discovered it was actually a cyst full of tapeworm larvae. After the removal, she required no further treatment.

This condition is known as neurocysticercosis, which can cause neurological symptoms when larval cysts develop in the brain. People who get the parasitic infection do so by swallowing eggs found in the feces of a person who has an intestinal tapeworm, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Neurocysticercosis is deadly, and a leading cause of adult onset epilepsy worldwide, the CDC said.

Tapeworms typically take up residence in human’s intestines, an infection known as taeniasis, and some can pass on their own without medication. The parasite is commonly transmitted when people consume undercooked pork — pigs are often intermediary tapeworm hosts — or come in contact with food, water and soil contaminated with tapeworm eggs.

The woman, who worked as a barista, was considered to be at no or very low risk of infection with tapeworm larvae but is believed to have somehow accidentally ingested tapeworm eggs released from a carrier.

A man from Texas had a similar experience, suffering from splitting headaches for more than a decade that turned out to be caused by tapeworm larvae that became lodged in his brain’s fourth ventricle.

The best line of defense against similar infection is cooking meat to safe temperatures, washing your hands with soap before eating and only eating food you can ensure was cooked in sanitary conditions.

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