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Sean Hannity Attacks Joe Biden’s Mental Fitness Despite Tucker Carlson Saying Tactic Won’t Work

Sean Hannity has attacked Joe Biden’s mental fitness just two weeks after Tucker Carlson said that this tactic was a “mistake” because the Democratic nominee came across as “precise” at the presidential debate.

Hannity laid into Biden on his Monday night Fox News broadcast for briefly forgetting Sen. Mitt Romney’s name as well as for a recent incident where Biden mistakingly said he was running for senate, not president.

“Maybe somebody on the staff might want to remind the ever forgetful Joe that he is running for president. He’s not running for senator,” Hannity said. “He keeps forgetting, forgets the day of the week, forgets what office he’s running for. He is running for president, not senator. Somebody remind him!”

He went on to say: “He is obviously not capable of leading. He has been hiding the entire campaign, and the corrupt media mob is covering for him.”

However, Hannity may have not gotten the memo, as two weeks ago, Carlson said “it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline.”

Sean Hannity
Sean Hannity is pictured at Del Frisco’s Grille on April 2, 2018 in New York City. He has said on his show that he believes some parts of the U.S. should end the lockdown in place due to the coronavirus.
Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Carlson said the Trump administration’s attempts to paint Biden as “senile” or suffering from dementia are the wrong tactic and even conceded that the 77-year-old Democrat came across well at the debate.

“As a political matter, the main thing we learned last night is that it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline,” Carlson said on September 30. “Yes, it’s real. Yes, Joe Biden is fading, we’ve showed you dozens of examples of it for months now.”

“But on stage last night, Biden did not seem senile,” he continued. “If you tuned in expecting him to forget his own name—and honestly, we did expect that—you may have been surprised by how precise some of his answers were. Not all of them, but enough of them. Trump isn’t going to win this race by calling Joe Biden senile.”

Another person who seems to have not gotten the memo either is Donald Trump himself.

This morning, the President took aim at his opponent’s mental stability once again in a tweet lambasting Biden for mistakingly saying he was running for senate.

“Mitt can’t be thrilled about this!” Trump wrote: “Joe also said yesterday he’s running for the U.S. Senate (again) and totally forgot where he was (wrong State!). Joe has never been a nice or kind guy, so

2016 Presidential Election Led To More Heart Attacks, Strokes, Study Says

KEY POINTS

  • Data shows more heart attacks and stroke hospitalizations in the two days right after the 2016 presidential election
  • Sociopolitical stress may have triggered the cardiovascular events, researchers say
  • According to a recent survey, many people see the political climate of the country as a “significant source of stress”

Can political events trigger heart ailments? A new study found that more people were hospitalized with acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the days immediately following the 2016 presidential election than before it.

For the new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Kaiser Permanente, researchers looked at acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) and stroke diagnoses, as well as emergency diagnoses of chest pains and unstable angina among adults in the Kaiser Permanente data, which includes 4.6 million people.

The researchers compared data from the two days right after the election with the same two days in the week prior to it. They found that cardiovascular hospitalizations in the two days immediately after the elections was 1.6 times higher than the previous week. The rate of cardiovascular hospitalizations was 353.75 per 100,000 people in the two days prior to the election and it rose to 573.14 per 100,000 in the next two days.

“Results were similar across sex, age, and race/ethnicity groups,” the researchers wrote in the study report. They said the results could be a result of the sociopolitical stress people experienced at the time.

The risk for cardiovascular events is high after a stressor or trigger event, the researchers said. 

“The risk of onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke is increased within hours to days after psychological triggers, including anger, depression, anxiety, and stress,” the researchers wrote.

This includes major events such as earthquakes and terror attacks. For instance, there was 70% more evaluations of angina and myocardial infarction on the day of the Sept. 11 attacks. In this case, it appears that the “trigger” event may be the presidential election.

In a report published by the American Psychological Association (APA) in July, 77% of Democrats and 62% of Republicans said the political climate in the country is a “significant source of stress.”

In another nationwide survey by the APA, 68% of the adult respondents noted that the 2020 presidential election is a big source of stress. By comparison, the number was lower during the 2016 presidential election with 52%.

“This is a wake-up call for every health professional that we need to pay greater attention to the ways in which stress linked to political campaigns, rhetoric and election outcomes can directly harm health,” corresponding author David Williams, of Harvard T.H. Chan School, said in a news release.

Although the researchers noted that further studies were needed to understand the relationship between cardiovascular events and sociopolitical stress, the results could be a reminder for people to be more aware of their stress levels and take the necessary precautions to care for their cardiovascular health.

The study is published in the Proceedings of

Mounting Ransomware Attacks Morph Into a Deadly Concern

Hackers are increasingly targeting health-care institutions and threatening people’s well-being as their software attacks get more sophisticated and brazen.

Ransomware attacks, in which hackers cripple a software system until they receive a bounty, have surged this year, along with financial demands, security experts say. The attacks have been around for decades but have flourished as society has become more dependent on technology. Other factors include the rise of the cryptocurrency bitcoin, more advanced hacking techniques and, some say, the widespread adoption of cyber insurance.

“The trend has been going up for a while, but in 2020 it has just been skyrocketing,” said Dmitri Alperovitch, the chairman of Silverado Policy Accelerator, a nonprofit think tank focused on cybersecurity.

Hackers have expanded their targets to include health-care companies. This week, one of the nation’s largest hospital chains,

Universal Health Services Inc.,

diverted ambulances from some facilities after a crippling ransomware attack. It said the outage didn’t harm patients, but systems used for medical records, laboratories and pharmacies were offline at about 250 of the company’s U.S. facilities.

The attack occurred Sunday morning, and the Universal Health’s network remained offline Wednesday, though priority systems such as email and clinical operations systems were being restored gradually across the country, the company said.

In a separate incident in Germany, prosecutors have launched an investigation after a woman died earlier this month when her ambulance was diverted from University Hospital Düsseldorf in the country’s North Rhine-Westphalia state.

A ransomware attack hit the hospital on Sept. 10, shutting down computer systems and forcing it to reroute ambulances away from its emergency room for 13 days. IT systems there are still recovering, hospital spokesman Tobias Pott said Tuesday.

Attacks on medical facilities are worrying because delays in patient care have been directly linked to patient harm, said Joshua Corman, a senior adviser at the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. “We’ve had a growing concern that this degraded and delayed patient care would lead to a demonstrable loss of life.”

Mr. Corman said he had hoped hackers would leave hospitals alone as they were swamped by the coronavirus pandemic, but that hasn’t happened. “We’d assumed that they would be smart enough not to attack, but I think [hackers’] assumption was that [victims] would definitely pay.”

Cybersecurity company

FireEye Inc.

says ransom demands for large organizations can range between $10 million and $30 million, and hackers are increasingly following up their ransom demands with threats to publish stolen data online, hoping to extract more money. Many companies make the payments.


“Victims are paying millions of dollars in ransom, and it’s continuing to perpetuate this criminal activity.”


— Dmitri Alperovitch, chairman of cybersecurity think thank Silverado Policy Accelerator

But some don’t. Last week, hackers released Social Security numbers and other private information after administrators at a Las Vegas public-school district refused to pay an extortion demand, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

This month alone, FireEye has tracked 100 ransomware incidents world-wide, more than twice

Despite Attacks on Mental Fitness, Most Americans Say Biden Is More Mentally Capable Than Trump

Americans saying Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is mentally fit and capable of leading the country outnumber those saying President Donald Trump is, judging by a new poll, despite the Republican president’s continued attacks on Biden’s mental fitness.

In the poll, conducted by Morning Consult, 54 percent of Americans said that Biden is capable of leading the country, while 52 percent said he is mentally fit.

In comparison, 43 percent said that Trump is capable of leading the country and 49 percent said he is mentally fit.

The Morning Consult poll surveyed 1,991 registered voters from September 25 to September 27 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.

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The findings come amid Trump’s continued attacks on Biden’s mental fitness ahead of the first presidential debate on Tuesday night and the November election.

In July, Trump’s campaign released a series of attack ads against the former vice president, with titles including, “Joe Biden is clearly diminished,” “Joe Biden is slipping” and “Do you think Joe Biden has the mental fortitude to be president?”

Trump’s attacks on Biden’s mental capacity have continued over the past few months, and while speaking to supporters in Pittsburgh this month, he said that Biden “doesn’t have a clue”

“He doesn’t know where the hell he is,” Trump said. “This guy doesn’t know he’s alive.”

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During another campaign rally in Pennsylvania, Trump said that Biden is “a dumb guy. Always known as a dumb guy,” but added that he looked forward to facing off against him in the first debate.

Joe Biden
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event on September 27, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.
Alex Wong/Getty

Earlier in September, Trump posted a tweet that read, “Great! Biden is finally being forced out of his basement. Now you’ll be able to see what is going on ‘up there’.”

Trump also recently demanded that Biden take a drug test prior to the first debate, as he has continued to suggest that the former vice president is using performance-enhancing drugs.

In response, Biden’s deputy campaign manager Kate Bedingfield issued a statement to Politico stating that “Vice President Biden intends to deliver his debate answers in words. If the president thinks his best case is made in urine he can have at it.”

“We’d expect nothing less from Donald Trump, who pissed away the chance to protect the lives of 200K Americans when he didn’t make a plan to stop COVID-19,” the statement added.

In the Morning Consult poll, 57 percent of respondents said that Trump is in good health, compared to 46 percent who said the same of Biden.

Newsweek reached out to the Trump and Biden campaigns for comment but did not receive a response in time for publication.

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